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kc10boom
09-05-2005, 06:43 AM
:eek: I just bought a Thunder Tiger 3s 1320 battery for my Yard Stik. I have never owed a Lipo battery before. I started reading the instructions and warnings and got scared to death. I feel as though I should charge and store it in a bomb shelter. Are these batteries really this dangerous or are the manufactures just covering their butts?

ragbag
09-05-2005, 01:02 PM
They can be!!

They are covering their butts and yours.
The naysayers run all kind of bad news whenever one of us make a mistake.

They don't mention the hundreds of hours of fun we are having all over the world, as we speak.

Read the instructions and follow them. If you don't understand them, ask, someone will come up with the answer.

The hard part is sorting the right answer from the people who know and the same naysayers who like to fabricate stories about fires and people going to jail for outstanding warrants when the police wrote up the report of the suburban that caught on fire.
A recent thing that went across the threads a week or so ago.

My first and only mistake so far was wiring the Deans connector backwards.
Let the smoke out of the 3s1500 packs,$42.00, Castle Creations controler, $85.00. I had buttoned up the Zero and had it ready to fly when I smelled a strange smell. Cooking Lipos!!!

Believe it or not, they replaced the controler under warranty for half price and it was my mistake. Hows that for customer service.

My friend didn't feel the same about the three Kokams that I bought from him.;)

I love my lipos, gave away all the nicads except the seven cells packs for the gliders.

BY George

Geoff_Gino
09-05-2005, 01:06 PM
Hi Kc10boom

Treated with and with respect you should never have any fear of LiPo's.

Somewhere in the threads are the do's and don'ts of LiPo's.
Never try to charge a battery that is obviously damaged, never charge more than 1C (Normal capacity of the cell) and always be in attendance when charging.

Been using LiPo's for a short while and I always have a chemical extinguisher at hand and have had not a single problem as yet. I let the battery cool down for 20 minutes or so and re-charge the cell in the plane.

Geoff

ragbag
09-05-2005, 01:58 PM
Safety Notes
Buying any lithium polymer cell or pack is assuming a responsibility to learn safe handling, charging and discharging for personal safety. The responsibility of the user is to read, learn and use the recommendations and safety features provided by PolyQuest. If you have any doubts in your ability to follow these instructions, then we recommend not purchasing lithium polymer batteries for your safety.

Please be sure to read and follow these instructions carefully.




Safe Charging
Lithium Polymer cells have very strict charging requirements.
Always charge Lithium Polymer cells or packs with recommended PCM.
Always use chargers specifically approved for lithium polymer cells or packs.
Always test your charger to assure it is functioning properly.
Always charge your lithium polymer cells or packs in a low fire risk area or a fire proof container.
Always store lithium polymer cells or packs in a fire proof container.
Always have sand or dry fire extinguisher handy in the event of fire.
Always keep any battery out of the reach of children.
Always handle lithium polymer cells and packs with great care.
Always purchase a factory authorized built pack instead of building your own.
Always observe the correct polarity when connecting cells or packs to charger or application.
Always seek medical attention if electrolyte gets in your eyes (flush with cold water immediately).
Always scrub with soap and water if electrolyte comes in contact with your skin.
Never charge lithium polymer cells or packs unattended.
Never charge lithium polymer beyond factory specifications.
Never charge lithium polymer inside your car, home or garage or where other physical damage can occur.
Never charge lithium polymer while in the application as the hot pack may ignite certain materials.
Never charge lithium polymer on flammable materials such as wood, foam or plastic.
Never extinguish a lithium polymer fire with water.
Never disassemble a lithium polymer cell or pack (see Damaged notes below).
Never short circuit lithium polymer cells or packs.
Never use a lithium polymer cell or pack that has been damaged (see Damaged notes below).
Never put cells or packs with exposed terminals in your pocket, purse, bag, desk drawer, etc.
Never keep cells or packs in temperatures that exceed 60C/140F.
Never exceed the factories maximum allowed discharge rates.
Never combine different sized packs or capacities together in series or parallel.
Never disconnect the battery pack from the PCM during charging. Power off charger first.
Never use a pulse charger with the PCM such as Schultze (they are not compatible).

Damaged cells or packs
In the event your cells or packs were involved in a crash.....
Totally inspect the cells, wire leads and connections for possible short circuit.
If there is any doubt completely cut all wires from the cells and pack.
If any cells are dented or deformed do not use the pack again ever.
Follow disposal notes below.

Disposal of cells or packs
Discharge all cells individually to recommended cut-off voltage of 3.0 volts per cell.
Caution!! Cells may be warm or hot as usual during this discharge process.
After cooling, puncture small hole in cells and immerse in salt water for several hours.
Apply tape over over terminals, put in a bag and dispose of in trash.


As like any standard chemicals you use or store around work or home,
Follow all safety directions to prevent accidents or damage to persons or property.
Safety must be your first priority when using Lithium Polymer cells or packs.
Educate yourself, Educate your friends
And implement safe handling and usage of all Polymer Batteries.

PolyQuest Lithium Polymer Batteries distributed by RC Lipos, Inc are approved only for the Radio-Control Market. Use in any other application is not permitted without prior approval. Charging, discharging, use for Electric Motors and Flying Models may cause serious personal injury or property damage. In purchasing/using PolyQuest Polymer Batteries, the buyer/user, agrees to accept all responsibilities of these risks and not to hold PolyQuest (manufacturer), its Distributors or Retailers (including all owners and employees) responsible for any accidents, injury to persons, or damage to property.

Since many Radio-Control applications exceed the manufacturer's recommended maximum discharge rates there is no warranty (expressed or implied) by the manufacturer, its Distributors and Retailers in respect to the Cycle Life, Capacity, Cell Characteristics or Storage of cells/packs used in the Radio-Control market.


http://www.rclipos.com/

Not sure who's battery you have, but here is a pretty good guide.
By George

GeraldRosebery
09-05-2005, 02:34 PM
:eek: I just bought a Thunder Tiger 3s 1320 battery for my Yard Stik. I have never owed a Lipo battery before. I started reading the instructions and warnings and got scared to death. I feel as though I should charge and store it in a bomb shelter. Are these batteries really this dangerous or are the manufactures just covering their butts?

Yes, they are just covering their butts, big time. LiPos can and are used very day, probably millions of times by now, safely. Just use common sense. Use the right chargers, don't combines unlike cells together and charge at the right rate for the packs used. NO PROBLEMS!

ForestCam
09-05-2005, 04:19 PM
What I get a kick out of is the fact that most people carry a lipo around on their belt or pocket for hours at a time, charge them on the kicthen counter or desk and hold them right against their face but I've never seen them put their cell phone in a blast box. :D
Any battery can explode under the right conditions, even a good old dry cell and I've personally seen a car battery blow but they all had one thing in common, operator error.

kc10boom
09-05-2005, 05:43 PM
Thanks to all for the good information. There are a lot of dos and don'ts.

ragbag
09-05-2005, 05:54 PM
More people lump start a car wrong than right!!
And when that one goes off there is battery acid all over the place.

Glad we could be of some help.
George

kc135boomer
09-08-2005, 07:17 PM
I agree with what everyone said, I can tell you from experience "DO NOT OVERCHARGE!!" (Sure made for a fat pack :mad: )

Oh ya...
NKAWTG....N!!!

Phil

GeraldRosebery
09-09-2005, 11:25 PM
What I get a kick out of is the fact that most people carry a lipo around on their belt or pocket for hours at a time, charge them on the kicthen counter or desk and hold them right against their face but I've never seen them put their cell phone in a blast box. :D
Any battery can explode under the right conditions, even a good old dry cell and I've personally seen a car battery blow but they all had one thing in common, operator error.

Talking about a car battery blowing up - why is it always when you are up to your butt in aligators (in my case literally in the middle of the Everglades swamp.) Turned the key and "BLAM" battery acid everywhere under the hood - such fun. Didn't stop me using car batteries though!

ForestCam
09-10-2005, 12:54 AM
Talking about a car battery blowing up - why is it always when you are up to your butt in aligators (in my case literally in the middle of the Everglades swamp.) Turned the key and "BLAM" battery acid everywhere under the hood - such fun. Didn't stop me using car batteries though!
You can thank some guy named Murphy.:D

mle2tie
09-10-2005, 06:32 AM
my mantra is
RTFM
Read the (.......ummmm) friendly manual

rahtware
09-10-2005, 03:57 PM
my mantra is
RTFM
Read the (.......ummmm) friendly manual
Good one... Mine is "when in fear or doubt, run in circles scream and shout!:D

My apologies for the HJ.:o

debhicks
09-10-2005, 04:10 PM
:) Man, what kind of luck is that, blowing up a battery in the middle of the glade. Hope you weren't to attractive to the hungry gators. :)

How does that happen anyway.

Like anything, say your electric razor, power saw, chain saw or lipo battery. All require respect. The only things in life that don't earn respect are those things that are man made and life threatening.

E-Challenged
09-10-2005, 05:59 PM
Getting ready to start using lipos, stuff I have learned:

1.Provide adequate cooling air flow to battery pack during flight, check current draw and change prop size/pitch and gearing to get safe current draw.
2.Be aware of safe maximum and continuous amp output capability, not advertising hype. Use the throttle and common sense.
3.Set your speed control for 3volts per cell low voltage cutoff.
4.Be sure that your lipo charger is set for proper number of cells and is working properly, avoid any possibility of shorts on charging leads etc.
5. Charge packs in a fire proof container away from things that could burn.
6. Keep an eye on packs during entire charge cycle and be ready to disconnect and move pack to open area if it starts to swell.
7. Keep a bucket of sand ready to throw on pack if it ignites.
8. Buy packs with individual cell taps if possible, periodically check cell voltage and balance charge cells when needed to maintain best performance and pack life.

It's a hassle but it can be worth it!:)

DickCorby
09-10-2005, 06:31 PM
Lots good advice here. I've been using them for over 2 years now in anywhere from small packs to now 10S-3P in my Yak 72 inch model. At first I too fried a ESC, turned a few into sausages, and even blew one up and it burst into flames at the flying field and burned a hole in the bench where it was charging. ( that was embarasing)

But in every case it was operator error.

I now have no fear of charging them in 2 of my aircraft. Both Planes would have had to have some major structural changes to make the batteries removable. And I have been seeing more and more people doing the same.

Another good thing to remember is don't skimp on the charger. Get a good Charger right up front. I use the Astro Flight Li-Po charger, and it's very dependable, and versatile. Some of the problems I had at first were using a cheap charger, and not setting it right. Astro has a knob and visual indication making it a lot easier to keep out ot trouble.

Make sure and be there during charging, stay below the 1C rate (4.25 to 4.50 Amps on the 5000MAH packs), and make sure they arent hot after a flignt, and during charging. I do have access to them so I can feel them regularly to see that they don't get hot during charging. If they begin to show signs of warming during charge, just unplugging them would stop the danger, and then troubleshoot the problem.

As and example you have a motor that draws 45 AMPs on the bench, be sure that the packs are at least 6000MAH - giving a good margin for them staying cool in flight, and of course increased flight times as a bonus. Proper mating of motor draw, ESC amps, and overall MAH of the packs also can make all differance in the world.

At one point there was talk by the old timers in our club of banning the use of Li-Po's at our flying field. Then more and more the old timers that feared them, began to use them, and now you see very few electrics with anything else but Li-Po. Just be very intimate with them, and you'll have no problems.

mle2tie
09-10-2005, 06:53 PM
rtfm is so important that they put it on a t-shirt
http://www.thinkgeek.com/tshirts/frustrations/3239/

Elfi Flyer
09-11-2005, 05:44 PM
:eek: I just bought a Thunder Tiger 3s 1320 battery for my Yard Stik. I have never owed a Lipo battery before. I started reading the instructions and warnings and got scared to death. I feel as though I should charge and store it in a bomb shelter. Are these batteries really this dangerous or are the manufactures just covering their butts?

You now have a ton of information, all of which merits a complete read. I find I have switched to LiPo's almost 100% across the fleet of some 14 planes. I too use the Thunder Power (I think that is what you meant) 1320 2S1P packs. Great pack and just the right dimensions for use in many planes. I run this pack on a Pico Tiger Moth, also on a Lil Rascal.

My bomb shelter? The security box (for letters & documents) you can get at Wally World for $9.95. Look in the office supply area. It makes a great carrying case for your charger, the LiPo's, and it is lockable so as to keep prying fingers away, aka little crumb snatchers with insatiable curiosities.

Comon sense, a good safety enclosure, using the recommendations for charging and cooling as already stated, and you will have no problems. LiPo's are, IMHO, the definite way to go with electric powered models. Look at the progress made to date in just the last 3 years, in the form of available sizes (dimension and capacity), suppliers, and discharge capabilities. Nice to see the prices becoming more reasonable also.

Good luck with your Nitro Cats...er...Tiger Tails.....er....Thunder Powers.
;) :)

E-F