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AEAJR
10-03-2006, 09:02 PM
THE NEW GLIDER PILOT'S HANDBOOK
Second Edition
by Ed Anderson

If you are just getting started in thermal duration gliders in any form, then there are many things you will want to know. The New Glider Pilot's Handbook is here to try and make that easier.

In the first edition of the New Glider Pilot's Handbook, I compiled the resources based on a series of articles I wrote for RCEzine.com. Unfortunately the magazine went under so the info is no longer available. I have rewritten much of the material and posted it in a variety of places around the forums.

This is a compilation of many of those articles and threads, some of which are right here on wattflyer.com. While many of the articles are mine, I have included some excellent work by other authors. Also, I have provided links that go to various forums and locations so the new glider pilot can discover the breadth of on-line resources that are available. The articles are rich with links to other resources as well, so this listing is deceptive. There is much more behind the links than you might expect.

Some of the links go to threads that I started when I had a question. I felt the content of those threads was helpful, so I have included them here as resources. Have you ever sat in a class hopeful that someone else will ask the question that you don't want to ask? Well, I asked for you. Take a look at the responses.

I invite other pilots to contribute to the thread to expand and supplement what I have compiled here. I invite those with questions to post them in this thread or one of the threads referenced below. The only dumb question is the one you don't ask.

To new and experienced flyers alike, I hope you find something here that will be useful and will contribute to your soaring experience.

=============================================

GETTING STARTED

Getting Started with Gliders
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=217

Sailplane terms
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185385 (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185385)


Discus Launched Gliders
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=230

Why Join a Club?
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=232 (http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=232)

Welcome to the Novice Lounge
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=224

Other Pilot's Recommendations for First Sailplanes
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=211753



TIPS

Learning to Use a Hi-Start
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8922 (http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8922)

Plane Locators
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=237

Performance Tuning Gliders
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=227


Using Ballast
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=232

Test Flight Procedures
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=226

Workshop Ventilation
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=235

Tip Stalling and Wing Washout
http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_1120310/tm.htm (http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_1120310/tm.htm)

Getting Planes out of trees
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=239

Sample Set-up for a Full House Glider
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=233

Weather - Knowing When to Fly
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=236




RADIOS

Choosing a Sailplane Radio - What to Consider
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=223

First Time Servo Set-up
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=248


What Goes on Which Stick
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=234


EPA/ATV
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=247

Dual Rates and Exponential Compared and Explained
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=249

What you need to know about receivers
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?p=72964#post72964 (http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?p=72964#post72964)

THE JOY OF SOARING

Trying to explain the thrill of gliders to friends
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=175969 (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=175969)

The Joy of the Hunt
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=225

Soaring is more fun with friends
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=228

Follow me, silently, and I'll show you where there's lift! :)

For all you electric guys:

First Electric Gliders
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=235 (http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=235)

AEAJR
01-06-2007, 11:30 AM
What should I add to the glider pilot's handbook?

Tonywjones44
01-15-2007, 09:55 PM
Are we talking about a conventional book as well as the links to all the forums/threads? If so, where can I buy it. I do a lot of my reading in the bath and already dunked one laptop. :D

AEAJR
01-16-2007, 12:34 AM
I am talking about the articles I write and post on the interent, or articles that other people have found on the internet. Really good discussion threads might be appropriate as well, but I tend to shy away from them.

I would add links to the first post.

I have enough for a book but have no planes on going to hard copy print at this time.

Lil-Snoopy
01-16-2007, 02:47 AM
Wing type, pollyhedrial, dihedrial etc... and rudder angle or deflection might help people new to the scene to understand why each is used for differant styles of sailplane flight.

TeamTigerPaw
04-11-2007, 05:09 PM
AQEAJR
Thanks for the great info. As a long time modeler (competitive controline and intermediate R/C ) I'm new to gliders. Got the hi-start down but once your up it's the now what do I do. This is where we need the help of experienced people like your self. Thanks for your time and effort and know there are many that benefit but may not take the time to say thanks.
Keep it up. pun intended :>)
Joe

Murocflyer
04-11-2007, 05:16 PM
Once again Ed, you're always there with plenty of info to share. I don't know how you can continually find the motivation to do so. Great job.

Frank

AEAJR
04-11-2007, 08:49 PM
Once again Ed, you're always there with plenty of info to share. I don't know how you can continually find the motivation to do so. Great job.

Frank

TeamTigerPaw and Frank,

I accumulate info for myself. As I do so I write it up, organize it and offer it up to my students, and all of you. There are lots of people doing this.

Its fun to learn new things and I find I learn them best if I write them down. By helping others you really help yourself.

Glad you find it useful.

Murocflyer
04-12-2007, 03:22 AM
So true Ed, so true. I often thought of cutting and pasting info onto a word .doc for future reference, just haven't gotten a "round toit" yet.

Thanks for taking the time to help us out.

Frank

AEAJR
04-12-2007, 03:30 AM
Now you have one!

Murocflyer
04-12-2007, 03:46 AM
Good one!

Dang, no excuse now! :( :)

Frank

Hand-Eye-Guy
10-24-2007, 06:20 AM
I've been flying for a little while now and have had my first thermal last august. I was flying my Wing Dragon at a local private flying field and had read about hunting thermals.

I had placed my Dragon into the wind @ about 300-400' and had noticed the stick getting, what I would call, "light" & started to climb clockwise. It was climbing in a perfect spiral like the birds we see on the highways. This was also over our main st. asphalt.

I'm looking to get a Multiplex Cularis, just need to save some money. This board has given me a constant supply of information, thanks guys!

AEAJR
10-24-2007, 08:35 AM
We sound like we started in a similar way. I started on an Aerobird which I learned to thermal. A Spirit was my first glider. Now I fly gliders 80% of the time.

FlyWheel
01-17-2008, 01:24 AM
We sound like we started in a similar way. I started on an Aerobird which I learned to thermal. A Spirit was my first glider. Now I fly gliders 80% of the time.

Small world. I started on an AeroBird, which I may have thermaled<Sp?> once or twice without knowing it (it did stay up for an unusually long time without any power). And I'm currently putting together an Easy Star as an E-glider.

(Cue "twilight Zone" theme now)

AEAJR
01-18-2008, 03:00 AM
You will enjoy the Easy Star.

FlyWheel
02-07-2008, 05:14 AM
You will enjoy the Easy Star.

So I've heard, it was the many WattFlyer recommendations that lead to my choosing it in the first place. :D

AEAJR
02-07-2008, 08:24 AM
Tips on Easy Star as an e-glider.

Balance -

Many people have their Easy Star's too nose heavy. This makes them more stable for beginners, but it also leads to a common complaint that the rudder is ineffective. Nose heavy means less responsive. If your rudder seems ineffective, before you modify it, try moving the CG back a little.

In relation to thermal soaring, moving the CG back is even more important. In order to detect a thermal, the plane must be very sensative to small changes in the air currents.

You climb to height, power off and glide, as smoothly as possible. If you are nose heavy, the plane will "plow" right through a thermal. Move the CG back and the plane will read the air much more easily.

So, I would suggest you set the CG according ot the Multiplex instructions. Then, once you have it trimmed out, move the CG back. Typically that is most easily done by moving the battery back.

Try 1/4" and take a few flights. Glide the plane. Are you having trouble keeping it under control? No? Move it back another 1/4".

Over time, the further back the CG, the more responsive the plane will be come to hte rudder AND the more easily it can report lift and rise in it.

I hope that makes sense.

AEAJR
02-29-2008, 05:48 PM
For all you budding RC Soaring guys, you should make a point of subscribing to RC Soaring Digest. This is a free publication on the topic of RC Soaring, both thermal and slope.

http://www.rcsoaringdigest.com (http://www.rcsoaringdigest.com/)

You just download the PDF. Great content. I have an article in the March issue. ;)

But even when I don't have anything in it, I highly recommend it.

FlyWheel
03-09-2008, 06:25 AM
Tips on Easy Star as an e-glider.

Balance -

Many people have their Easy Star's too nose heavy. This makes them more stable for beginners, but it also leads to a common complaint that the rudder is ineffective. Nose heavy means less responsive. If your rudder seems ineffective, before you modify it, try moving the CG back a little.

In relation to thermal soaring, moving the CG back is even more important. In order to detect a thermal, the plane must be very sensative to small changes in the air currents.

You climb to height, power off and glide, as smoothly as possible. If you are nose heavy, the plane will "plow" right through a thermal. Move the CG back and the plane will read the air much more easily.

So, I would suggest you set the CG according ot the Multiplex instructions. Then, once you have it trimmed out, move the CG back. Typically that is most easily done by moving the battery back.

Try 1/4" and take a few flights. Glide the plane. Are you having trouble keeping it under control? No? Move it back another 1/4".

Over time, the further back the CG, the more responsive the plane will be come to hte rudder AND the more easily it can report lift and rise in it.

I hope that makes sense.

Excellent tips, thanks. Right now I have the pack velcro'ed all the way forward and this puts the CG right at the "5 mm ahead of the rear edge of the spar cover" position as per MultiPlex's recommendations. I had to add a little extra weight to nudge it forward. I've just started flying this bird and right now I want stability. It handles very well this way under power. but I can see what you mean about how this would hinder gliding, as she does seem to "plow" through the air very quickly balanced this way. A slower "floating" flight is what I think would want for thermalling.

One question. When she's weighted back as you described, how do you handle this plane's tendancy to porpoise under power?

AEAJR
03-09-2008, 06:31 AM
If you are getting porpoise, then you have a trim problem. Likely too much up elevator is trimmed in.

The elevator ends up getting trimmed up a bit to support that heavy nose. As you move the CG back you can trim the elevator down a touch. Porpoising under power is caused by the elevator, not the CG.

FlyWheel
03-09-2008, 11:45 PM
If you are getting porpoise, then you have a trim problem. Likely too much up elevator is trimmed in.

The elevator ends up getting trimmed up a bit to support that heavy nose. As you move the CG back you can trim the elevator down a touch. Porpoising under power is caused by the elevator, not the CG.

My CoG is currently about 5mm ahead of the rear edge of the spar cover. Again, that's with the extra weight of the Alti under the hood. Remove that and it's spot on it. Right now the elevator is trimmed down slightly. However, this was determined while under power. I'd rather have her fly level at the lowest power or dead stick. I can always nudge the elevator down a little more when "putting the hammer down", right?

AEAJR
03-10-2008, 01:46 AM
If your CG is forward of the recommend point then your plane is REALLY nose heavy.

With these parkflyers, most people will trim elevator so the plane flies level at 1/2 throttle. I like to trim and balance the plane such that it flies level in a glide.

FlyWheel
03-10-2008, 04:55 AM
If your CG is forward of the recommend point then your plane is REALLY nose heavy.

With these parkflyers, most people will trim elevator so the plane flies level at 1/2 throttle. I like to trim and balance the plane such that it flies level in a glide.

Oops, I goofed, right now it is on the recommnded CG point, (I had to add the extra weight to get it there, my bad).

But Elfi did put a little down elevator trim on her, this will push the nose down in a glide causing her to drop faster as well, right? If so, should I remove the trim and try flying her with the elevator "neutral"? Or put her up first and untrim her in the air and see how she flies?

AEAJR
03-10-2008, 08:38 AM
Depends on how you fly. Your plane will normally climb under power but how much is up to you.

Since I tend to fly my planes more as gliders than as aerobats, I tend to tune for neutral glide at neutral elevator setting.

This way you use throttle to cntrol altitude as well as speed.

AEAJR
09-08-2008, 07:47 PM
Glider pilots often talk about flying in contests. Many new pilots shy away from this because they feel they are not interested or not ready for competition. However, what I have lreaned is that flying in contests is one of the best learning experiences you can have.

Read my article here. Then, if you are interested, read the article at the link below. Flying contests is about learning new skills, making new friends and having a whole lot of fun. Oh, yea, maybe about winning too, but I don't worry about that too much. :D



BUILDING PARTICIPATION IN CLUB AND ESL CONTESTS
by Ed Anderson

David Beach’s article ( link below ) talks about the League of Silent Flight Soaring Achievement program. Over the past few years I have had many people encourage me to give this program a try. I finally took a look and decided to start the LSF program myself. It looked like an interesting set of challenges, some of which would expose me to parts of soaring that I would not otherwise experience.

As I looked at the tasks and the flow of the program I also saw an opportunity to work with the LSF program as a way to prepare and encourage pilots to participate in contest flying at my club. This would be in the context of training rather than competition.

Starting at LSF level II, the pilot must participate in a minimum of 6 contests in order to test their developing skills and demonstrate a level of proficiently. The contests become the way the pilot measures their training progress. This takes the concept of contest flying from the area of competition into the area of pilot training.

I believe, if properly approached, the developing pilot will be eager to enter contests in order to measure their progress and to allow them to advance to the next LSF level. This is a great way to introduce new pilots into the fun of contests.

Starting at level III, contests must have a minimum of 10 participants. At this and the more advanced levels, ESL contests would be a very attractive way to meet these requirements.

I have begun to encourage members of our club to sign up for the LSF program. Our club now has a newly appointed LSF club coordinator who will help speed up the registration process. Working the program will become a club project that supports the individual flyer as they progress through the levels.

Since introducing the LSF program at the last club meeting several members have submitted their applications and some have already completed level 1. We are having active discussions on the field about the tasks that we will perform at the higher levels. And we are counting the contests to see when we will be able to advance to the next level.

I believe this is going to be a positive addition to the activities of our club. If you do not currently have an active LSF program in your club, you may wish to consider incorporating the LSF tasks into your club's regular activities. As members move through the tasks and levels, they will gain confidence and will look forward to the contest portion of the program and flying in the ESL contests.

If you have experience with integrating the LSF program into your club's activities I would really like to get your tips and ideas on how to make this work. I am also looking for ideas on how we might be able to incorporate the LSF program into the ESL. The more active the LSF program is in the clubs, the more likely those club members will join the fun at the ESL contests.


THE ESL, THE LSF, AND YOU
by David Beach
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=342 (http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=342)

AEAJR
04-27-2009, 04:20 PM
FIRST GLIDERS - Many Options - Consider Electric

I have been teaching new pilots for several years. While I personally prefer pure gliders, I find that new pilots learn faster on electric launched gliders. This gives them more air time and they do not need large spaces or launch equipment in order to practice.

The three planes that I recommend most often are the ParkZone Radian, the Easy Glider Pro and the Easy Star.

The Radian is the newest of the three. As a first airplane, as a first glider and as a glider trainer it is a hit in every respect.

RTF or receiver ready ( PNP )
Plenty of power for quick climbs
R/E controls for simplicty
Resiliant foam - hard to break, easy to fix
Excellent glide angle
2M size is great for beginners
Breaks down and goes back in the box after the flight.
The RTF comes with 2.4 GHz radio so there is no frequency control needed.

Once I get pilots flying with confidence, I focus on getting them into thermal hunting. Again, the electric launch makes this easier than it would be with a pure glider. If you fail to find lift, just power up and climb rather than land, and relaunch. This allows the pilot to focus on one task, thermal hunting rather than the whole set of skills needed for hi-start, DLG or winch lanching.

Electric gliders are also excellent for learning to slope soar. The motor gives the pilot a safety net. If they get into trouble or if the lift dies, rather than a trip into the brush to find a plane, just power up and fly back to the landing site. Or go high and look for thermals until the lift returns.

My Easy Glider Electric is my preferred slope glider when conditions are iffy, or when I am teaching a new slope pilot. Saves a lot of heartach and disasters. :)

Once they have become moderatly proficent with finding thermals or flying on the slope with their e-glider, I encourage them to try a pure gliders. This is a different experience. Pure gliders can be lighter, more streamlined. They also present a new challenge. You MUST find lift to stay in the air. This puts a new level of challenge before the pilot.

When they have trained on an e-glider, then learning to use a hi-start, winch, DLG launch represents only a single new skill set required. They know how to fly, they know how to hunt lift. Now they will learn to launch without the aid of a motor.

Whether you enjoy thermal soaring or slope soaring, these planes will make good trainers. And, once you have mastered the basics you don't have to put them away as they will provide years of joyful soaring. They will also be great tools to get your friends soaring.

There is nothing wrong with learning on a pure glider. But I have found e-gliders make for faster learning, and quicker time to soaring satisfaction.

May the lift be with you always! ;)

ConRman
06-02-2009, 03:55 AM
Help!!!!!!!!

Out of the blue my son buy's me a Parkzone Radian and I couldn't keep it in level flight and prevent purposing. What is the starting set-up for first flight? Oh yeah, I crashed on the maiden and broke 1/2 the fuse in front of the tail feathers.

Also, anybody seen a Real Flight 4.5 sim for the Raiden.

Thanks for being here, ConRman

Larry3215
06-02-2009, 04:43 AM
If by porposing you mean the nose pitches up every time it gains speed, then it could one of two things.

1)It could be the angle between the main wing and the stab is wrong - too much positive incidence on the main wing (or negative on the horizontal stab/elevator.
2)Its too nose heavy.

If its impossible to keep it flying level at a constant speed, then there are two different possibilities.

1)it may be too tail heavy
2)the elevator has slop or play in the linkage or the servo isnt centering. Could be something binding or stiff hinges etc.

Those are the most likely culprits :)

AEAJR
06-18-2009, 07:25 PM
A Timer's Guide for TD contests.
By Ed Anderson

The timer's role at the typical thermal duration contest can be as simple as
running a watch, keeping the pilot aware of the time, and reporting the
time and landing points to the score keeper. It is easy and it is fun.
Plus, you can learn a lot by watching how pilots manage their flights, read
the air and set-up for their landings. Even if you don't feel ready to fly
a thermal duration contest, working as a timer is a lot of fun and a great
learning experience.

However, the timer's role can be very valuable as the timer is allowed to
help the pilot during the flight. How much of this actually occurs will
depend on the timer and the pilot involved and how they wish to work
together. Some pilots welcome the help and others prefer the timer to be
quiet and just work the watch. But even a rookie pilot, working as a
timer, can help an experienced pilot with just the right information at just
the right time.


TIMING DUTIES

The timer's job is to record the duration of the flight as well as any
landing points. This is then reported to the score keeper once the flight
is complete. If you do nothing else, you have fulfilled your role as timer.
Good job!

The timer will need to know the specified task in effect. Before the pilot
launches the plane, confirm that you are in agreement as to what the task
time is for this round.

For example, the CD may have declared an 8 minute round. That means the
pilot is trying to have his flight last EXACTLY 8 minutes, not a second more
or less. Not every pilot hits it exactly but the timer can help by keeping
the pilot informed of his time throughout the flight.

1) Time starts when the glider leaves the winch or hi-start hook.

2) Prior to the launch, ask your pilot how often he wishes updates. Some
would like ever minute. Some may not want any updates till half way and
some may not wish an update till there are two minutes left. Ask your pilot
for his preferences.

3) Last two minutes - Each pilot has a preference, but typical is to give a
notice when there are two minutes left. Using the 8 minute task, during the
6th minute typically pilots want an update every 15 seconds. This is
usually when they are planning their landing.

6 minutes
6:15
6:30
6:45
7:00 minutes

4) Last Minute - Typically during the last minute the pilot wants an update
every 5 seconds and to have the last 10 seconds counted down. Check with
the CD as to when time stops. In most cases, time stops when the plane
touches any earth bound material such as a branch, grass, or the ground
itself. The plane may still be flying but if it touches something, time
stops. But check to be sure as local rules may differ.

But assuming the plane has not touched, here is the typical last minute:

7:05
7:10
7:15
......
7:45
7:50
:51
:52
:53
......
:58
:59
8:00

At this point, if the plane is still in the air, stop counting but keep the
watch running so you can record the whole flight. If it is 8:06, that is
what you report. If it is 7:49, that is what you report, plus any landing
points.


HELPING - Generally timers can help in five ways -


After the launch

You will need to help your pilot move from the launch area so that the next
pilot can launch. Typically this is done by a "follow my voice" approach.
Many pilots don't want to be touched while they are flying so be aware of
this. Just gently guide them toward the landing area. The don't have to be
on a landing station right away, but they should be in the area so when it
is time to land they don't have to go very far.


Watching other pilots

If this is a man-on-man style contest, your pilot may be interested in what
the other pilots in the flight group are doing. He is only competing with
those pilots regardless of who else is in the air, so note who the other
pilots are before the launch. You may wish to make a note of their planes
so you can more easily spot them in the sky. If you don't know the other
pilot's names, ask your pilot.


Looking for Lift

In all formats you can be helpful if you know how to spot lift indicators.
Ultimately it is the pilot's decision what to do but you can make him aware
of options and conditions. If the pilot chooses not to take your
suggestions, do not be offended, you are offering options, not instructions.

Birds circling in lift
Other gliders circling in lift
Birds feeding in a confined area
Other lift indicators that you may know.


Coaching

If you are timing for a rookie pilot and you are much more experienced, you
can offer advice. However, be very gentle with your suggestions. No matter
how bad a pilot he may be, he is still the pilot and still in control. You
are offering advice, not instructions. Never take offense if he does not
follow. He may be unable, unsure or afraid to do what you suggest. This is
his flight, not yours. Ask before you give advice and keep it to yourself
if he prefers to fly on his own.


Landing

The landing area can become quite busy. The pilot is focused on his plane.
You should be focused on the watch, but whenever possible be aware of other
planes in the area. You could help the pilot avoid a mid air which will not
help his time and might cost him his plane.

If landing tapes are being used, straighten the tape. Ask your pilot if he
has any particular orientation for the landing tape he may prefer. For
example he may wish the tape away or toward him.

Some landing areas have marked stations. Help you pilot get into position.
Typically this is done some time during the last two minutes, but well
before the final approach.

If there are landing points, you mark the landing and report the landing to
the pilot to insure he agrees. Landing is measured at the tip of the nose
of the plane. The plane must be upright. Most contests will not allow
points for a plane that lands inverted or flips over. It can "stick" into
the ground, sometimes called a "dork" or dart landing. Check with the CD
about local rules, before the flight.


REPORTING

When the flight is over, tell the pilot his time, confirm the landing
points, then immediately go to the scoring desk to report the time and
landing points. Make sure you know his name. Don't clear your watch till
after the time and points are reported. The timekeeper has the option to see
the watch, so be prepared to show it.


Out of Bounds

Most fields have boundaries. They will be discussed at the pilot's meeting.
If the pilot lands out of bounds he gets a zero for the flight and that is
what you report.


SUMMARY

Ultimately the pilot is in command. Your primary job is to time, to record
the landing points and to report them to the score keeper. However be aware
that you are allowed to help if you feel able and if the pilot is willing to
accept your assistance.


That was a quick summary of the timer's job. I welcome comments and other
people's guides for timers.

AEAJR
10-18-2009, 01:44 PM
I continue to be impressed with the Radian. I now own one and it is now my main trainer plane.

The Easy Glider and Easy Glider Pro, as a pure gliders, continue to get my top recommendation as a first pure glider for hi-start, winch or for slope soaring.

There are lots of other good gliders out there but these are the ones that seem to lead to the fastest progress to complete independence at the field. They thermal very well and they can take some abuse.

Once you can fly these you can fly any type of glider.

Roaddog
05-15-2010, 02:24 PM
Friend Ed,
We don't know ea. other; but I've "read you" a lot, and feel compelled to say how much you've meant to my personal modeling efforts. It seems everywhere I turn, there's "ol' Ed" w/the voice of experience. And it's ALWAYS good, sensible, clear advice and quite often quite lyrical when you explain the, "what it's all about", sorts o' stuff. I've D/L'd a lot o' your stuff to word-doc's and refer to it regularly.
I'm still in "recovery mode" and only flying my sim; but there are several models down in the shop that will be a taste better, and better-flown, due to something I learned from you in one of several different forums.
There are not enough like you; and I strongly feel the "few" need to be told by the many that we greatly appreciate all you give us.
My personal thanks,
RD

AEAJR
05-15-2010, 02:33 PM
RD,

Thanks for your kind words. It is posts like yours that tell me that what I do is worthwhile. Thanks for taking the time to let me know. Now don't forget to pass it on to others.

Best of luck on your recover. I hope those models see air soon. ;)

Roaddog
05-15-2010, 04:00 PM
Had no idea you were even on when I posted that! But you're very welcome. It's called "credit where credit is due". :O)
RD

MWShelton
08-13-2010, 03:35 AM
I am talking about the articles I write and post on the interent, or articles that other people have found on the internet. Really good discussion threads might be appropriate as well, but I tend to shy away from them.

I would add links to the first post.

I have enough for a book but have no planes on going to hard copy print at this time. I'll buy a copy but I want it signed :D Now you can post a lot of pics of your unpowered ships hint hint.

AEAJR
08-13-2010, 04:10 AM
I'll buy a copy but I want it signed :D Now you can post a lot of pics of your unpowered ships hint hint.

You asked to see photos of my gliders. This is not all of them and it does not include any of the electric launched gliders. But it is a good sample.

MWShelton
08-13-2010, 04:31 AM
Thanks for the pics. Thats quite a nice collection!

AEAJR
08-13-2010, 04:35 AM
They are all different and all fun. Wing spans run from 33" to 134"

SBS_Pilot
04-20-2011, 02:02 PM
What should I add to the glider pilot's handbook?

I must admit that I haven't read ALL of the excellent material you are providing here, but so far I am missing a good article concerning servos. I have read a lot of forum posts in different forums (yeah, I'm more of a lurker than a poster) where someone asks a specific questions about servo selection and get good, specific answers, and that is fine. But I would like to read an article discussing which type/size of servos that suits different kind of planes, control surfaces, flying techniques, or whatever circumstances that affects the choice of servos.

Thank you very much for the time, effort and knowledge you (and others) have put to support all of us who are still walking in the steep phase of the learning curve.

/Stefan

AEAJR
04-20-2011, 09:25 PM
I must admit that I haven't read ALL of the excellent material you are providing here, but so far I am missing a good article concerning servos. I have read a lot of forum posts in different forums (yeah, I'm more of a lurker than a poster) where someone asks a specific questions about servo selection and get good, specific answers, and that is fine. But I would like to read an article discussing which type/size of servos that suits different kind of planes, control surfaces, flying techniques, or whatever circumstances that affects the choice of servos.

Thank you very much for the time, effort and knowledge you (and others) have put to support all of us who are still walking in the steep phase of the learning curve.

/Stefan

Good topic, but hardly focused on flying gliders now is it? In most cases the MFG recommends servos so there is not much to figure out. Just buy what they recommend and you will be good. If you have to figure it out yourself then use these. This will cover 90% of all situations

DLGs -
Dymond D47s for competition and Hitec HS-45 or 55 for sport

2-4 meter thermal and slope gliders
JR DS368s or Airtronics 94761Z for competition and Hitec HS-85 or Hitec 5485s for sport with HS-81s or 55s for spoilers. Use metal gear servos on the flaps to help resist stripping if the flaps hit the ground.

There are lots of great choices out there but if you use these you won't go wrong.

SBS_Pilot
04-20-2011, 10:40 PM
Thank you for a fast and precise answer - I really appreciate that.

The reason for the question were that I (and I think it goes for a lot of us newbies) don't have a clue to what size of servos is needed for different sizes of control surfaces. I also read somewhere that someone recommended only digital servos for the elevator, which just enhanced the confusion for me (why just for the elevator and not for all surfaces?). I have also had a hard time trying to sort out which recommendations is more applicable for large competition machines suitable for winching (if that matters at all?) and which advices is applicable for me who is just keen to make my first steps in thermalling with a small, old, badly (heavy) built, underpowered and over-repaired Precedent Hi-Fly, after a few months with electric motor planes.

As I said: I really appreciate the advice and I will stick to it with my first plane(s), but since I am one of those persons who always wants to find out why a specific advice is given I definitely wouldn't mind if you (or someone else with deep enough knowledge) would take your time to clarify which parameters affects servo selection. I'm in no hurry (at least I hope that my first glider will survive for a while) so if an article arrives next week, next month or next year doesn't really matter.

Anyway, thank you one more time for the well written and very good answers and articles you have written in different forums.

/Stefan

AEAJR
04-20-2011, 10:53 PM
Thank you for a fast and precise answer - I really appreciate that.

The reason for the question were that I (and I think it goes for a lot of us newbies) don't have a clue to what size of servos is needed for different sizes of control surfaces. I also read somewhere that someone recommended only digital servos for the elevator, which just enhanced the confusion for me (why just for the elevator and not for all surfaces?). I have also had a hard time trying to sort out which recommendations is more applicable for large competition machines suitable for winching (if that matters at all?) and which advices is applicable for me who is just keen to make my first steps in thermalling with a small, old, badly (heavy) built, underpowered and over-repaired Precedent Hi-Fly, after a few months with electric motor planes.

As I said: I really appreciate the advice and I will stick to it with my first plane(s), but since I am one of those persons who always wants to find out why a specific advice is given I definitely wouldn't mind if you (or someone else with deep enough knowledge) would take your time to clarify which parameters affects servo selection. I'm in no hurry (at least I hope that my first glider will survive for a while) so if an article arrives next week, next month or next year doesn't really matter.

Anyway, thank you one more time for the well written and very good answers and articles you have written in different forums.

/Stefan

Digital on the elevator is not a maximum recommendation, I presume they are saying that they see this as the minimum use of digital.

Digitals have much more precise centering and since the elevator is so critical to the handling of your glider, they are saying that even if they could not afford digitals on all surfaces they would try to put a digital on the elevator.

That post might have been mine as that is how I now lay out my gliders. It is not required on all surfaces for a sport glider, IMHO, but it would be my preference to have digital on the elevator. Centering!

Dr.kc
06-01-2011, 08:05 AM
I purchased a second hand Last Down V3 (3200mm span) in very good condition.

I have flown her twice and everything was just good but....not fine, she felt heavy and was coming down for landing really hot because the original manufacturing of the flaps does not allow them to go any further than 40 degrees…..

So….I couldn’t hold my self by modifying things around in order to reduce some weight, make her more stable in turns around thermals and fix the flaps issue.

1. I removed one of the two rear servos (Rudder servo, almost 25gr, aft away from the CG) to the frond using push-pull linkage.
2. Reversed the two flaps surfaces to make them deflect almost 90 degrees down and 40 up.
3. Bought new lighter batteries.
4. Bought 8mm aluminum tubs, to replace the carbon ones which hold the outer wing pieces, and bended them 3-3,5 degrees to improve stability of the bird by adding this small outer dihedral.

The pre-mode take off mass was 2910gr and now I reached 2790gr….not bad for such a bird.

My problem now is to read as much as I can about mixing and programming my Transmitter (Futaba T8FG with the V3 update installed 12+2 ch.) in order to understand as much as possible, because the all flights so far performed with the old owner’s transmitter where all mixing was sett just fine with 3 conditions and butterfly / crow, Ail-Ele mixing, Ail differential etc…..

My problem now seats on the fact that I cannot find any website that explains what is the crow-mix and how that will look (in terms of visual feedback) on my glider. I mean for example, how low is the term “Lower the Flaps”, or many degrees are acceptable for the Ail differential, or how many degrees down you have to deflect the elevator surface, and how many up both ailerons when butterfly, or how much up-flap you need when you ender the “speed condition”……..

If you can suggest any site, thread, post etc it will help the most.

AEAJR
06-01-2011, 09:45 AM
Nice job of reducing weight on your glider.

Some general statements first.

Degrees of deflection on your surfaces is according to to your personal preferences. Every bird and every pilot are different. And these may differ according to your flying style. Sport, competition, F3J, F3B, TD, ... it depends. Clearly you recognize this as you changed set-up on the flaps to meet your desires as opposed to how they were set up originally.

Since much of this is covered in the New Glider Pilots's Handbook, the first post in this thread, I presume you have not actually read it. While some of the links may have been broken, the ones that relate to your question seem to be working fine.


Sailplane terms
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185385 (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185385)

Welcome to the Novice Lounge
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=224


TIPS

Performance Tuning Gliders
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=227 (http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=227)

Using Ballast
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=232 (http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=232)

Test Flight Procedures
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=226 (http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=226)

Sample Set-up for a Full House Glider
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=233 (http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=233)



RADIOS

Choosing a Sailplane Radio - What to Consider
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/show...047#post105047 (http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?p=105047#post105047)

First Time Servo Set-up
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=248


What Goes on Which Stick
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=234 (http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=234)

EPA/ATV
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=247

Dual Rates and Exponential Compared and Explained
http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=249 (http://forums.flyesl.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=249)


Trailing edge camber adjustments - Best Practices?
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=403126 (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=403126)



Beyond this wil lbe specific to your radio and your glider which is beyond what I can do here as I don't know either of them. I suggest you do a search on your radio and your glider here and in the sailplane section of www.rcgroups.com (http://www.rcgroups.com) to find other glider pilots who have your glider and/or your radio.

Dr.kc
06-01-2011, 11:58 AM
Thanks again.

Everything very useful....

I started the reading.
:tc:

Wildflyer
03-12-2012, 10:31 PM
Apparently the --forums.flyesl---- is no longer available, so none of the links to it work.

AEAJR
03-13-2012, 03:50 AM
Thanks for letting me know. I have updated the links. They should work now.

AEAJR
08-12-2013, 03:51 PM
Since this is Wattflyer AND so many new glider pilots are getting into soaring with electric launched gliders, let me add this resource.

This is a free e-book on the subject of electric powered flight that may be helpful to e-glider pilots. There is a link included that goes to the actual e-book where you can find the latest updates and ask your electric questions.

TABLE OF CONTENTS - General
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31071

Post# ..... Topic

1 ............Preface
2 ............Amps vs Volts vs C
3 ............Sizing Power Systems
4.............Props vs. Amps
5 ............What is an Electronic Speed Control - Updated 11-2008
6 ............The LVC, Low Voltage Cut-off
7 ............Who Needs a Wattmeter?
8 ............Why Use a Gearbox?
9 ............Extended Flight Times and Balance
10 ...........Battery Basics
11 ...........Lithium Batteries, Chargers and Balancers
12 ...........Six Keys to Success for New Pilots
13 ...........Things to Check on an RTF
14 ...........Now its Your Turn!
23 ...........The Role of the BEC (http://www.rcuniverse.com/buynow/keywordclick.cfm?bid_id=4602) in your ESC (http://www.rcuniverse.com/buynow/keywordclick.cfm?bid_id=5300)
24 ...........The Mythical Best First Plane
33 ...........What You Need to Know About Receivers
36 ...........The AMA Park Pilot Program
39 ...........What goes on which stick?
65 ...........WHAT DO THE KV RATINGS ON MOTORS MEAN?
108 .......... A .pdf compiled and reorganized verion of the book- Current as of 2009
260 ...........Estimating Battery Run Time
261 .........How to Select Your First Radio

AEAJR
02-13-2014, 07:09 PM
Video from one of the Unlimited sailplane contests at our field.
This is an Eastern soaring league contest. This is a man on man launch

That's me in the tan hat and blue shirt calling the launch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6wCvoY_3aI