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View Full Version : Cool trivia fact about PZ FW-190


max2112
11-15-2006, 08:48 PM
I bought a used PZ Focke Wulfe 190 here on WattFlyer and it got here today!
As soon as I got it out of the box I recognized the crest that is on the left side of the nose. It is the crest for the city of Nürnberg, here in Germany. I don't know if Park Zone modeled their decals after an actual bomber or not, but I thought it was a neat factoid.

John

DetroitHawk
11-15-2006, 09:12 PM
it's a pretty fun plane, how do you like flying it?

max2112
11-15-2006, 09:22 PM
D.Hawk,

I haven't had the chance yet. I actually bought this before I was ready for it. For now I am comfortable w/ my Pico stick-F. It is pretty docile and doesn't need a lot of space.
I was planning on flying the Wolf for the first time next spring.
But once I had it out of the box, my self control began to fade immediately!

DetroitHawk
11-15-2006, 09:37 PM
D.Hawk,

I haven't had the chance yet. I actually bought this before I was ready for it. For now I am comfortable w/ my Pico stick-F. It is pretty docile and doesn't need a lot of space.
I was planning on flying the Wolf for the first time next spring.
But once I had it out of the box, my self control began to fade immediately!

Just stay on the power and only power down when you are going to land the plane. That is my advice.

max2112
11-15-2006, 10:39 PM
I appreciate the advice.
I will try and put it to good use one day.

max2112
02-19-2007, 12:09 AM
Just stay on the power and only power down when you are going to land the plane. That is my advice.

It took over 3 months...

But I can finally say: Thanks for the good advice, DHawk!

TeslaWinger
02-19-2007, 02:14 AM
Max, half the fun of a scale plane - especially a warbird- is researching the history of them. It makes for a deeper apreciation of these tragic but heroic machines.

That's quite a performance difference between the PicoStick and a flatout hellbound angel you got there!

Perhaps a simple bridge between the 2 types of performance would be to get a cheap foam delta to get the hang of a frisky handling plane with a lot less risk of fatal damage than a scale ship. I must have crashed my Zagi delta a hundred times (with nearly a thousand flights) and learned something from each one- with the benefit being that a crash didn't end my flying for the day- usually! :D

Best of luck.
TW

max2112
02-19-2007, 08:19 AM
Max, half the fun of a scale plane - especially a warbird- is researching the history of them. It makes for a deeper apreciation of these tragic but heroic machines.

That's quite a performance difference between the PicoStick and a flatout hellbound angel you got there!

Perhaps a simple bridge between the 2 types of performance would be to get a cheap foam delta to get the hang of a frisky handling plane with a lot less risk of fatal damage than a scale ship. I must have crashed my Zagi delta a hundred times (with nearly a thousand flights) and learned something from each one- with the benefit being that a crash didn't end my flying for the day- usually! :D

Best of luck.
TW

Wow. That's pretty uncanny. Last night I was looking at a used great Planes Slinger. Do you think that might be a good interim plane?

I have a project in my head that will one day get built. I want to find slightly obscure warbird that has a special story. Research it front to back and build a 60" model of it. Right now I don't have the skill, money, or a bench to build it on.
But oneday....

DetroitHawk
02-20-2007, 04:30 PM
:mad: It took over 3 months...

But I can finally say: Thanks for the good advice, DHawk!


How did she fly?

I remember my first launch with this plane i had no idea what to expect but it is a nice flying plane. I think the next one i work on will be the spitfire.

max2112
02-20-2007, 07:16 PM
I felt the same way. I had several smaller, slower planes with me that afternoon, and we were goofing off and waiting for the wind to die down. I thought, "To HECK with that!" I figured I had a heavy enough plane to handle 10 mph winds.

Fortune favors the bold, right?

I plugged in the battry, did a range and functions check, and heaved her towards the horizon at about 85% throttle.

15 seconds later I was thinking: "Holy crud!! Big mistake!"

But I sorted it out and flew two laps around the field and brought her in.
The first landing I misjudged the speed and space required. So 1 and 1/2 cartwheels later I went to inspect. No damage!:o

Second flight was better. About 3 loops around. I brought it down and bled off speed and did a quality belly skid landing.

I felt the battery was losing it's oomph, but I wanted one more flight. I should have left well enough alone. I let the plane get totally downwind from me and never recovered. I ended up breaking the left side of the elevator. It was a pretty easy fix.

I guess that's a very long way to say it flew GREAT!!:D

Like you said... Just stay on the power until you bring it down.

TeslaWinger
02-21-2007, 02:55 AM
I always felt that one should learn to fly the plane first - then learn to fly the plane in wind and turbulence too! ESPECIALLY when taking a big step up to a hottie! Its wise to reduce the number of things you have to learn- all at the same time! :D
Fixin 'em strong and straight is an art. You can't see the patches when its up in the air- again! Have at it, lad!

If that Slinger is EPP go for it. You'll be a better fighter pilot soon.