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mpotter187
01-15-2007, 09:33 PM
I just ordered my first sailplane today a Vista EP, I currently am planning on using a 6 channel Futaba FM micro receiver but I see the range is only 650 feet. I never had any range issues before but I was flying small electrics that had only half the wingspan. I know with a 2 meter sailplane its going to be allot bigger so I am going to be taking it higher up especially in search of lift. Is this receiver going to be good enough for range, or should I order a full range receiver like a berg 4 channel to keep from losing the plane?

Sky Sharkster
01-15-2007, 11:55 PM
Hello Mpotter, I've never heard of an FM receiver with that short of a range, usually it's the AM's that are under 1,000 feet. It may be a single conversion or have some other limitation, but whatever the reason, my suggestion is that you don't fly any glider without a "Full Range" or dual conversion FM Rx that specifically states it will work "To the limit of visibility" or 3000 feet or something beyond 1/2 mile.
Now, we've all heard stories of how someone used a $13.00 AM RX in a three meter glider and landed in another state without problem. That's all great and may even be true, but I'm not willing to risk my glider, the safety of anyone around or even the loss of a flying site to prove it's not.
Most of the time, when flyers state distances, they are speaking of vertical distance; How high the glider got. That isn't the same as how far away the receiver is from the transmitter. Do we fly straight up over our heads? No, the glider goes upwind, downwind and any where else the thermals might be, or take us. Add that distance to the altitude and you'll come up with some large numbers. More than 1,000 feet, easily. More than 2,000 feet. Even if it's so high you can't see it very well, you still want and need (especially need!) full control.
My suggestion, based on many years of glider flying, is the FMA Direct M-5 receiver. This has been the most reliable and trouble-free Rx I've ever seen or used. I'm sure there are others equally good, but this is the only one I can personally vouch for.
Gliders fly higher, farther and longer than any type of model aircraft. They require the absolute best in equipment, no less. Save the short-range Rx for the "Park" flyers.
JMO
Ron

mpotter187
01-16-2007, 12:36 AM
The 650 foot range is what I got off a few websites I figured the range wasn't enough for something like a sailplane. The last thing I want is to lose signal at all, especially at those heights. I am ordering a new receiver for sure. I might try that FMA or try a Berg 4l I have heard good things about both.
Thanks for your help

Hello Mpotter, I've never heard of an FM receiver with that short of a range, usually it's the AM's that are under 1,000 feet. It may be a single conversion or have some other limitation, but whatever the reason, my suggestion is that you don't fly any glider without a "Full Range" or dual conversion FM Rx that specifically states it will work "To the limit of visibility" or 3000 feet or something beyond 1/2 mile.
Now, we've all heard stories of how someone used a $13.00 AM RX in a three meter glider and landed in another state without problem. That's all great and may even be true, but I'm not willing to risk my glider, the safety of anyone around or even the loss of a flying site to prove it's not.
Most of the time, when flyers state distances, they are speaking of vertical distance; How high the glider got. That isn't the same as how far away the receiver is from the transmitter. Do we fly straight up over our heads? No, the glider goes upwind, downwind and any where else the thermals might be, or take us. Add that distance to the altitude and you'll come up with some large numbers. More than 1,000 feet, easily. More than 2,000 feet. Even if it's so high you can't see it very well, you still want and need (especially need!) full control.
My suggestion, based on many years of glider flying, is the FMA Direct M-5 receiver. This has been the most reliable and trouble-free Rx I've ever seen or used. I'm sure there are others equally good, but this is the only one I can personally vouch for.
Gliders fly higher, farther and longer than any type of model aircraft. They require the absolute best in equipment, no less. Save the short-range Rx for the "Park" flyers.
JMO
Ron

AEAJR
04-30-2007, 02:52 AM
That Futaba receiver is definately not good or a 2M sailplane. You can exceed that range easily. If you read the specs it say sit is recommended for parkflyers.

I would recommend a Hitec Micro 05S or Hitec Electron 6. There are excellent receivers that have 1 mile range.

AEAJR
04-30-2007, 02:58 AM
Hello Mpotter, I've never heard of an FM receiver with that short of a range, usually it's the AM's that are under 1,000 feet.
JMO
Ron

Just an FYI, there are a fair number of short range FM receivers. Single conversion has nothing to do with it.

tillmas
05-01-2007, 01:14 AM
I can also recommend the Berg 7P from Castle Creations.

I have also used a caseless JR R6UL with good results.

Sparky Paul
05-01-2007, 01:48 AM
I use some of the dreadful "park flier" range receivers in my gliders.. I have yet to fly one out of range, before it gets out of sight.
650 feet in any event is pretty up there, the 2M plane is about the size of the button on the end of your extended transmitter antenna.
When the plane gets to about 1/2 that size, orientation and "can I get it back from that downwind?" are more important.
If you feel uncomfortable, get a receiver without that restriction.
You'll feel better, but the plane can still disappear on you anyway. :)

tillmas
05-01-2007, 03:21 AM
Remember that it isn't just altitude. A plane can get pretty far downrange in a hurry if you are chasing thermals.

A plane that is just over 450 feet away and 450 up is more than 650 feet away from the Tx. Most Hi-start launches put you in that situation, and all winches do.

Matt

AEAJR
05-01-2007, 04:02 AM
A 2M plane can easily be taken out 2000 feet. I have done it many times with my Spirit and my Sagitta 600. Our flying field is 1600 feet long and I have often flown well beyond the end of the field, out over the woods.

And you can easily get them over 1000 feet high. So the idea that a 650 foot receiver is adequate for a 2M plane is not only absurd, it is dangerous.

Receivers are rated in "safe" operating range. Almost any receiver will work further out than its rated range, but once you get beyond that rated range you are in the danger zone. So, that 650 foot receiver might work at 1000 feet, but you are working on the edge of disaster.

For a 2M sailplane, I would not want to use a receiver that is rated for less than 2000 feet.