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buzzbomber
02-28-2007, 04:16 PM
I have a motivation problem.

I bought a Sig 1/5th scale Cub in September '05, intending to build it as a tribute to a family friend and fullscale CFI who was famous for his refinement of cub flying techinique. Fast forward through a couple ARFs, a bunch of exams for professional licensing, and a few home projects, to the present day. It is now nearly March '07, we have a baby on the way(she's due June), and the Cub is still in the box.

I've been helping my wife build a plane (Stevens aero SQuiRT), and disassembling my hobby room, since it's going to be the nursery. All my stuff, save what's needed to finish the squirt, has been moved to the basement. I have a pool table and a couple metal office desks to work on down there, but just can't get motivated(it might have to do with the constant 55 temp all winter down there).

Just curious to hear from those who've "been there, done that". What do you think? Am I obsessing about all the stuff that 'needs' to get done, instead of taking a break to 'work' on something fun for myself, or is this normal? I keep telling myself I'll have plenty of time at home once the baby's here, and I can work on the cub between feeding/changing/cleaning/playing with jr., etc. duties, but I'm not convincing myself too well...


...convince me that building this thing is the right thing to do instead of buying a bARF Cub.

alienx
02-28-2007, 06:17 PM
Everything in its own time my friend! Congrats on the baby though!

Hey, look at how many people buy planes and then buy another one before they start the first one.

When it's time, it will be time. That's how the hobby is unfolding for me anyway!

Good luck. It will be a nice plane when you build it.

Grasshopper
02-28-2007, 06:34 PM
Everything in its own time my friend! Congrats on the baby though!

Hey, look at how many people buy planes and then buy another one before they start the first one.
When it's time, it will be time. That's how the hobby is unfolding for me anyway!

Good luck. It will be a nice plane when you build it.


I thought this was how you're supposed to do it????

Congrats on the baby Buzzbomber. Children are a true gift!

buzzbomber
03-01-2007, 02:56 PM
Thanks guys! I'm just having trouble it seems, finding the balance between getting all the child-related stuff I NEED to do done, and taking a deep breath to relax. Heck, I've been so busy around the house I haven't even had time to check my e-mail for the last week so I've been checking from work between phone calls, while the plotter's running, etc.

I have to admit, I'm a bit intimidated by the prospect of the whole project (the cub that is; the baby I think I can handle, I've had a few nephews to practice on...). Seriously though, there's a lot of fabrication and shaping on the cub......then again, maybe it isn't that different from raising a kid.

When I get around to it, in good time as you say, this one might be good practice to get me geared up for that "red box" Top Flite P-51B(yep, I said 'B' model) kit I picked up from a friend a year ago. With any luck I might get that one done before Junior's in college...;)

alienx
03-01-2007, 03:24 PM
Yes, like I said, from my experience (for what that's worth) I freeze up sometimes on things I don't have a clear direction on. Like solving a mounting issue or my current balance issue. And then sooner or later the fog clears and everything falls into place. Like writer's block I guess. All the other stuff you have in your head is probably just draining your building energy!!:)

Where do you fly? I am looking for a paved field this year. I left the parks and headed to Edison flying field last year and liked it, but the grass is pretty bad. I guess that 's what you get when you fly in a superfund site!:rolleyes:

buzzbomber
03-01-2007, 04:10 PM
alienx, I know what you mean about "builder's block". Funny thing about that is, I get froze up trying to put ARFs together more than kits. Don't know why, but I have more reservations about modifying some faceless factory drone's work than my own when I run into a problem.

I fly with Top O' New Jersey. We have two fields, one right near Waterloo Village, and the other in Hardyston, on the site of the old landfill(what was that you were saying about superfund sites?) Unfortunately, they are both grass fields, but the one near Waterloo village is pretty smooth and gets mowed closely enough that all but the smallest planes can usually take off and land w/o noseover.

I don't know how far away it is from you, but I think there's a public field at the Somerset County 4-H fairgrounds.

alienx
03-01-2007, 04:18 PM
alienx, I know what you mean about "builder's block". Funny thing about that is, I get froze up trying to put ARFs together more than kits. Don't know why, but I have more reservations about modifying some faceless factory drone's work than my own when I run into a problem.

I fly with Top O' New Jersey. We have two fields, one right near Waterloo Village, and the other in Hardyston, on the site of the old landfill(what was that you were saying about superfund sites?) Unfortunately, they are both grass fields, but the one near Waterloo village is pretty smooth and gets mowed closely enough that all but the smallest planes can usually take off and land w/o noseover.

I don't know how far away it is from you, but I think there's a public field at the Somerset County 4-H fairgrounds.

Thanks. I've heard of the Waterloo field. It isn't so far from me. I am about 12 miles South of 80 on the Parkway. But I've driven a lot further for hobbies before! Do you have a link to your club or the field? I'd like to check it out.

The other one I think is in Bridgewater (unless that is a separate field alltogether). I hear it is nicer than Edison, but I am pretty close to Edison. And as long as I belly land things, I am OK. But I really want to be able to ROG some planes. It's a ton of fun if you are scale-minded like I seem to be.

Thanks.

rea59
03-01-2007, 09:25 PM
I have a motivation problem.

I bought a Sig 1/5th scale Cub in September '05, intending to build it as a tribute to a family friend and fullscale CFI who was famous for his refinement of cub flying techinique. Fast forward through a couple ARFs, a bunch of exams for professional licensing, and a few home projects, to the present day. It is now nearly March '07, we have a baby on the way(she's due June), and the Cub is still in the box.

I've been helping my wife build a plane (Stevens aero SQuiRT), and disassembling my hobby room, since it's going to be the nursery. All my stuff, save what's needed to finish the squirt, has been moved to the basement. I have a pool table and a couple metal office desks to work on down there, but just can't get motivated(it might have to do with the constant 55 temp all winter down there).

Just curious to hear from those who've "been there, done that". What do you think? Am I obsessing about all the stuff that 'needs' to get done, instead of taking a break to 'work' on something fun for myself, or is this normal? I keep telling myself I'll have plenty of time at home once the baby's here, and I can work on the cub between feeding/changing/cleaning/playing with jr., etc. duties, but I'm not convincing myself too well...


...convince me that building this thing is the right thing to do instead of buying a bARF Cub.

Start the Cub when your ready is the best advice, but when you do, make sure you have it in a place that it can stay till done. Work on it here and there as you can. You'll probably build and fly several ARF's before you get done with the Cub but as the Cub starts taking shape and you get more confidant in your building skills you'll find yourself compelled to finish it.

When you have a "lot on your mind" and feel "unmotivated/overwhelmed" try this trick. (I learned several decades ago) Get out a piece of paper and write down everything on your mind. Make a list so to speak and then post it (fridge/bulletin board) where you can cross things off as you get them done. What you've done is effectively removed things from your conscious mind and put it on paper instead. The feeling of relief is almost immediate. Is it "playing mind games" with yourself? Maybe but then the stress levels go down and the motivation goes up so it's definitely worth it. :D

Congrats on the baby. I wish you the best of luck.:)

buzzbomber
03-02-2007, 03:18 PM
Thanks for the suggestions, fellas. I'm starting to feel a bit better now that I've got some of the house "prep" done, or at least know what direction it's heading. I think I've got a good spot staked out in the basement where I can leave the building board if I can't work on it.

Alien, the website for our club is http://www.toponewjersey.org. The attached picture shows the field, just below the text "kinney road". If you get on google earth and follow I-80 about a mile or two west from RT 206, you'll find the field.

Dereck
03-12-2007, 08:48 PM
Hi Matt
I had one of these - it's in my avatar over on some little forum called E Zone.

First off - it is one of the best kits I've ever built (the other - Adrian Page's Gee Bee R2). Sure, there's lots of accurate laser cut kits around - but not many are 84.5" span - which is 1/5th scale for a J3, not merely 80" IMAA legal like the zillion BARF clones around.

Okay, it did kind of take over the workshop - there is a lot of it! But everything went together well, everything fitted - there's not much around where you could build the wing struts over a seperate drawing and they'd about drop right in, but they did on this baby bear.

Covering - it demands some effort to achieve a scale like join between fuselage and fin, most of the BARFs don't seem to bother, but it is one item that defines a J3. At this size, it is a lot easier than on a smaller Cub (been there, done that :eek: )

Flying. I had it all together, balanced, range and systems checked. Took it to the Spring Sizzle in Rockville - the DC area's biggest E-vent - just to show off some, no intention of test flying her in public.

Until the organiser and a couple of my other 'clubmates' went round every pilot and arranged for my channel to be free and the field empty so I could carry out a test flight in clear air! I was the last to find out, so I had little by way of options by then.

I go out, line her up, open up, she takes off straight, climbs out and someone suggests I join in, turn her around before she flies to the next county and show her off to everyone.

The model was a delight to fly right off the board. Sure, I messed with aileron differential some - go for 1/4 down, 3/4 up - but even with the kit settings, some rudder / aileron co-ordination flew her around just fine from flight one.

I flew her a fair amount - no vices, about as aerobatic as a real Cub (I've seen one do a loop, an awful shaped roll and a one turn spin for real) and a *****cat on the order of a Kadet to take off and land, given you understand narrow tracked taildraggers.

Okay, I eventually sold her to a clubmate. It was a pain to carry around in my fairly small wagon and I've never been conned by the 'bigger is better' lobby - but her replacement is a Sig 1/6th clipwing Cub :)

Good luck with all your family comings and goings - life happens, you get to deal with it. At least all yours is upwards right now.

For the techies - mine weighed 8lb 2oz with 16 x 2400mA big roundies, Monokote covered. MaxCim 13Y, around 3.5:1 gearing, 16 x 8 APC-E, 30A or so flat out, 6800RPM. FLew her on 20 x 2000mA Nimh, way too much power. Got around 12 mins per flight on the 16 jug setup. In flight cruising speed was minimal, just like a real J3.

Go forth and build!

Regards

Dereck

buzzbomber
03-13-2007, 02:56 PM
Thanks for the encouragement, guys! While reading Dereck's post, I realized I goofed in the original post. I have a 1/6th scale Cub kit, NOT the 1/5th scale. You all were probably wondering why I thought this kit looked so difficult if you're familiar with the 1/5th and thought I meant that one. Didn't even realize until I saw Dereck mention the 84.5" wing and I thought, "wait a second, mine has a 72.5" wing!":confused: Whoops.

Alas, this cubby is not laser cut, it's die cut, in some places more like die crushed. And, did I mention it's designed with a one-piece wing? And boy, does a lot of stuff need to be sanded/carved. Ah, well. At least it's not printwood.

On a side note, my brother and his wife had their first baby over the weekend, a healthy little boy! So, I get a bit more practice on somebody else's kid for a few months before I have to gear up for the 24/7 routine:) . I guess he(my brother, that is) is not going to be out to the flying field much this spring, eh?

Dereck
03-13-2007, 04:18 PM
Hi Matt
Ain't you the lucky one? I'm doing an electrocution of the 1/6th clipwing for a QEFI review. This kit is what I grew up, so it only meant digging into the memory banks until life decided I was having fun and got into making itself a misery...

On a positive note, I've had a couple of Sig 1/6th electrocutions wander through my column in the last year or so and both the owners really liked them. They flew as well as any Sig kit - never heard of anyone who didn't like their Sig model - and look good. Mine will have a Mega 22/30/3E with 11x7 is at about 37A with 3S 3700s lipo. A decent 10 cell pack on a 40A BEC controller will do fine as well.

Even at around 5lb flying weight, they are quite "sprightly". Suspect it will be a little lighter, and I have a 4S lipo option to play with as well :)

The photos are of mine, close to finished, though she doesn't have the struts on yet. It is a real aircraft, believe it hangs out in Florida. Have yet to put the "N" numbers on the fuselage, might sub my custom AMA number just for fun.

Hope that's inspiring enough! It's a much easier model to work on than the 1/5th too - and I have a pretty big shop!

D

AmpAce
03-14-2007, 02:25 AM
Matt, there is some good advice here, in the previous posts.

I think the most important things are to to make sure you have a place to build where you can organize and lay things out for an extended length of time, without them getting disturbed or disrupted. This model isn't going to go together overnight, and the more you can take your time, and build on it when you feel like it, the better it is likely to turn out. One other thing goes along with the first, and that is, don't start building on it until you are good and ready. That means getting a place to build all set up, figuring out what you need to start, reading the instructions, studying the plans, etc. It is also probably best to have enough time available in your near future to get a good start building. As you make progress, you will probably get more inspired to keep at it.

I am currently building a 1/3 scale Balsa USA Super Cub kit. What a monster! It is going to take a long time to complete, as I am doing some modifications, and thereby tend to get "stuck" frequently. When this happens, I just back away from it for a while, and think about how I might get around the current "problem". Eventually inspiration comes to me, and I try the thought-out "solution". Sometimes it works, and sometimes I have to back away again and do some more thinking and "re-engineering".

Anyway, once you get started, try to have patience, think things through, and study the instructions and drawings so as to stay a couple of steps ahead of where you are currently building. This will help to keep you from "building yourself into a corner".

Best of luck with the project, and Happy Building!

AmpAce

Saucerguy2
04-26-2007, 08:12 PM
Some times, if I have actual entire days of free time, I'm just building non stop, yet currently, I don't have that luxury.

What I've done lately on the current build is taking it out of the box, looking at the plans, and only do minor things to it as to not have it absorb massive amounts of time. The last thing I did was literally sticking on one piece of balsa and calling it good for the evening. Doing it, broken up in this manner really lets you think about how you are going to go about the next step/stage of the build and you will find you are able to do so more tactfully, hopefully with higher quality results.

You will find your model coming together in no time, just take it one stick at a time and don't focus upon the entire project at once or it will seem overwhelming.

buzzbomber
04-27-2007, 03:17 PM
Update: I still haven't started the kit.:rolleyes: The baby's due in a month and a half, I still have to finish spackling and repainting the "nursery"(formerly my hobby workshop:( ), but I did install a new ceiling box, wired it up, and put in a ceiling fan & light, and I started pulling the baseboard trim out so I can put new flooring in the bathroom. This is all stuff I was supposed to do three years ago when we first moved in, by the way......oh, and my motorcycle needs new tires and the carbs tuned before I can get on with the cub, too. Maybe I'll just take 15 minutes to laminate the wing tip bows this weekend...

Saucerguy2
04-27-2007, 05:41 PM
I hear you on time, projects and generally, there is something else that always needs to be done. 15 minutes is all it takes to open a box and glue two sticks together.

Bill G
04-28-2007, 07:53 AM
Building a Cub is absolutely the right thing to do, since the world does not need yet another ARF Cub flyer at the fields.:eek:

I converted a Guillows when I first started in this. Unsuccessfully, of course.:D I revisited it, and got it flying, but too heavy and still needed attention. I've reworked much of the plane this winter, and just need to get out there and fly it now. One of the first planes I built. Everyone has to build a Cub.

Bill

CHELLIE
04-28-2007, 08:01 AM
You will enjoy the quiet in the basement after the baby comes :D :D :D so get yourself a nice heater down there, a small refrig, full of beer, great motivator, tv, radio and bed and you will be all set :rolleyes: :p ;)

And congrads on the little one , Chellie

Bill G
04-29-2007, 05:39 PM
You will enjoy the quiet in the basement after the baby comes :D :D :D so get yourself a nice heater down there, a small refrig, full of beer, great motivator, tv, radio and bed and you will be all set :rolleyes: :p ;)

And congrads on the little one , Chellie...or just turn the basement build room into a sleeping room also.:D (bed bottom left)