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Bill G
08-05-2007, 05:30 AM
Well I've had this plane over a year now, and finally braved it. A week ago or so, I tried it with a DD 370 motor, and the lauches went left, with now right thrust. Was simply not lauchable, but had the power. After this first attempt a week ago, I was even more nervous to try this plane again, since its a sheeted fuse Guillows balsa built with a heck of a lot of work in it.

I then decided to mount a 5800kv Feigao 12mm brushless with a GWS IPS-A gearbox and Master Airscrew 6x4 3-blader. Not much lighter in the end, since I needed a bit of noseweight for the desired cg setting, which I will post as soon as I go back downstairs to measure it. The IPS gearbox was adapted to mount to the stick, which was positioned for the original DD 370 motor, and with about 2 degrees of right thrust, which set it off perfectly straight on launch.

You can usually tell almost instantly if you have a winner, on launch. Very nervous in the first turn, as usual, but the plane quickly calmed my neves, as it handled fine. Had to end the flight after a few minutes, since it was near dark. I warmed up with my little Cox 190, since I was testing a new setup in it also, which worked well. The Cox plane flew well on around 15 miniscule watts on 3s, with the 180 geared and a 7060 slowfly prop.

With ailerons, this plane is very manouverable and responsive. The plane did require elevator on turns to prevent diving, and I think my cg could go aft a bit, but I like it the way it is, since I don't need it to be any more responsive.

The bottom of the wing formers had 1/16" strips of balsa added, which were shaped to form a slight semi-symmetrical airfoil, with a bit of undercamber. I think that creating a slight upward curve on the front of the wing going into the LE, versus a pure flat bottom wing, made the pitch stability much better, as it seemed fine. About 2 degrees of washout was added also. I noticed that the right side has a bit less, which I will correct, since I believe this was the only thing that made the flight characteristics just a bit less than absolutely perfect.

Once again, this is yet another plane of mine that kills those myths about weight.:D At 9.8oz it did NOT FLY HEAVY AT ALL. The off power glide in was foreeeeverrrrr.

Excuse the tiny, twilight flight pic, since I was also the photographer. Most of the closer shots didn't make it in the lens.

Twmaster
08-05-2007, 06:04 AM
Bill that is yet another amazing job you've done with those little Guillows planes.

Bravo!

Bill G
08-05-2007, 08:54 AM
Bill that is yet another amazing job you've done with those little Guillows planes.

Bravo!
Thanks. Next on the list is the FW190, but its heavier.::o

Bill

alienx
08-08-2007, 02:25 AM
Hey Bill, she's a beauty. Glad it worked out.

crxmanpat
08-09-2007, 11:06 PM
Bill, nice job on the Zero. I'm braving the B-29 right now. Lots of head scratching....

Bill G
03-26-2008, 03:28 PM
I finally got around to flying the Zero with the new motor swap. Flies as good as with the Feigao it had, and has a larger, more scale prop now too. Cyclops donated the IPS-D and Eflite ESC to me a while back.

Didn't take flight pics, since the last ones I took of it flying were specs, with my lousy digicam, and didn't have my photograper buddy with his nice camera with me.

This setup has to be perfect for this series of Guillows warbirds. You need the noseweight anyways, and its still lighter and uses less power than a 370 brushed, like what's in my Guillows Spitfire. I didn''t want to push it on 3s since it didn't have the 12V IPS motors, but less than half throttle was plenty for the plane.

Took the pic after the flight. Also in the pic is my second FlyZone Mosquito with 12V IPS brushed motors that I just finished. A real blast and excellent flyer.

Bill

Virgil Kee
04-09-2008, 05:19 AM
Hi Bill, I'm building the Zero, but as the RUFE type, sometimes referred to as the "Float Zero". I'll fly over GRASS (!), so I'll need to really strenghten the main float and the tailfin. I anticipate that a "landing" will look like that of a Mars Lander - a less-than-graceful somersault!

What 3-blade spinner did you use? I was afraid I'd have to MAKE one with no experience! :eek: Was yours commercially available?

Also, what was the thickness of your fuselage planking, and, what glue did you use that allowed reasonable sanding?

Virg.

Bill G
05-13-2008, 03:06 AM
Hi Bill, I'm building the Zero, but as the RUFE type, sometimes referred to as the "Float Zero". I'll fly over GRASS (!), so I'll need to really strenghten the main float and the tailfin. I anticipate that a "landing" will look like a Mars Lander - a less-than-graceful somersault!

What 3-blade spinner did you use? I was afraid I'd have to MAKE one with no experience! :eek: Was yours commercially available?

Also, what was the thickness of your fuselage planking, and, what glue did you use that allowed reasonable sanding?

Virg.
Guess I missed this one. Still going on it Virgil?
I used light 1/32" balsa. I've had different setups for props, but now the IPS-D with FSK 9x7 3-blader works well, and uses an FSK 3-blade push on spinner. I would think that a GWS 9x7 prop would work too, and the GWS 3-blade push on spinner would look even better. The IPS-D seems to be a good setup for it. You need the weight anyways in the nose, so there's no point in going lighter, as you'll probably need lead anyways.

Virgil Kee
05-13-2008, 07:24 AM
Bill G, thanks for your previous reply, but my remaining question is about what glue you used to join that 1/32" balsa. Was it sandable when dry and how was it applied to this thin stuff? :confused:

Virg.

Bill G
05-18-2008, 06:49 AM
Bill G, thanks for your previous reply, but my remaining question is about what glue you used to join that 1/32" balsa. Was it sandable when dry and how was it applied to this thin stuff? :confused:

Virg.
I sheet with thick BSI CA glue. Works well, as it does not cure too quickly. I use activator also, once an area is in place, and I don't want to hold it all day. The process uses a lot of CA, and be prepared to have a lot of CA on your hands :D when finished. I start by attaching a large sheet to the top fuse keel. Dampen the balsa outer suface to help the process, and apply glue to several stringers at a time, and then press down the sheeting. Do this for both side of the fuse, with a single sheet per side, if possilbe. Obviously at some points, you will need to make tapered relief cuts/and/or add separate panels.

The thick CA is not very sandable, although I use it for everything. I usually try to sand the seams directly across the seam to bring down high areas, and often need to use filler to tweak some areas. I often use heavy grits like 80 to try to "grate" away excess CA at seams first, concentrating only on the CA and trying not to remove surrounding wood. After this, I go to a finer grit, maybe 120, to contour/smoothen the overall surface.

Bill