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simibill
11-08-2005, 12:13 AM
Is there any rationale for the numbering scheme used by AXI motors? i.e., do the numbers relate somehow to size, power, weight or anything?

Curious minds want to know.

timocharis
11-08-2005, 12:32 AM
First two digits are stator diameter, second two are stator thickness. The number after the / is the winding count. IIRC.


Dave North

Matt Kirsch
11-08-2005, 01:32 AM
The numbers simply give you the physical dimensions of the stator. Really, they're meaningless for determining whether or not the motor is appropriate for a particular application. Treat them like they're meant, as model names, ways to differentiate between motors.

Look at it this way: Would you know if a "Chevy Silverado" was a full size pickup by looking at its name? Would you know how much power it has, how much weight it can carry? No, you look at the specifications to find that information out.

It's the same with electric motors. Look at the specifications to find out if the motor is appropriate for a particular plane. As a beginner, you should be looking more toward copying someone else's setup, but once you start branching off on your own, making up your own power systems, you'll find the most value in the motors' maximum cell count and current (Volts and Amps) ratings. Once you get more advanced, you'll start looking at the Kv ratings, using them to get a rough idea of how the motor will perform.

simibill
11-08-2005, 01:42 AM
Dave,
Thanks for the info.

sailr
11-08-2005, 03:03 PM
I don't know why they do that. Frankly, I'd rather see numbers to give the PHYSICAL SIZE of the motor. One company that does that is Hurricane Flight Systems.

DickCorby
11-08-2005, 04:48 PM
I don't know why they do that. Frankly, I'd rather see numbers to give the PHYSICAL SIZE of the motor. One company that does that is Hurricane Flight Systems.

I began to switch over to AXI's about 2 years ago, and havent looked back since. They fly everything from my little Falcon to the Quieque 72' Yak 54.

I too feel that the motors need to have some sort of standard numbering system, But have learned to live with it.

I have found that to choose a motor for a project, I go to Hobby Lobby's AXI listing, and choose a motor that they say will fly a plane in the weight range of the one I'm building. So far this has proven to work. Every plane has the necessary power when I maiden them. From there I tinker with props, battery count etc. to get exactly what I want out of the plane.

simibill
11-08-2005, 04:54 PM
I began to switch over to AXI's about 2 years ago, and havent looked back since. They fly everything from my little Falcon to the Quieque 72' Yak 54.

I too feel that the motors need to have some sort of standard numbering system, But have learned to live with it.

I have found that to choose a motor for a project, I go to Hobby Lobby's AXI listing, and choose a motor that they say will fly a plane in the weight range of the one I'm building. So far this has proven to work. Every plane has the necessary power when I maiden them. From there I tinker with props, battery count etc. to get exactly what I want out of the plane.

That's good advice - thanks

Jerry Hageman
11-09-2005, 12:42 AM
I totally agree with Dick Corby-Any of the tech reps at Hoby Lobby can quickly guide you to the appropriate size motor for your particular application. To me, choosing the correct battery and esc is much more complicated

DickCorby
11-09-2005, 12:57 AM
I totally agree with Dick Corby-Any of the tech reps at Hoby Lobby can quickly guide you to the appropriate size motor for your particular application. To me, choosing the correct battery and esc is much more complicated

I have found (and A.L. Johnson at Hobby Lobby said the same thing). The Specifications on the AXI's are pretty conservative. You can go over the Max by at least 25% for short bursts.

As an Example the 2826/10 in my Paramount 46 is drawing a static 58 Amps on 4S-2P 5000 MAH Pack. I'm using a Castle Creations 80 AMP ESC. Well above both the battery specs and the motor specs. But when the plane comes down, both battery, ESC, and motor are just barely warm. The added power is used just for takeoff, rest of the flight except for a few seconds of occasional vertical, is at mid throttle setting.

So I choose a Battery pack with total MAH rating well above the Specs for the motor, and the ESC the same. The few extra ounces a stronger ESC adds will be more than made up for by never burning it up.