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View Full Version : What kind of glue do you use on a hurt foamie?


grubbyjeans
09-21-2007, 01:23 AM
I got my SC off the truck today and after lunch and a battery charge I hurried out the door. I found a perfect place to play and had a great time!

I've never flown anything but folded paper, but I did a LOT of reading and that added to my understanding of the mechanics of flight, I did pretty well.

My mistake was that there was just a little too much wind. I checked by the method that is shown in the SC book and it was probably borderline, but I JUST GOT MY NEW TOY!!!.

I did a pre-check and did some taxi runs to get a feel of the rudder, then turned her into the wind. I got a good smooth take off and a first turn but on the downwind the plane just took off. I'd cut back on power to keep it from being a runaway then the turn back into the wind would be under powered and that's where I'd have problems.

I dropped the plane into the grass four or five times without damage. All the falls were from less than 10 ft and I remembered to cut power quickly.

I was in an area where construction of an apartment unit is planned so the area was fenced and there was lots of concrete for take offs and grass for crashes. There was NO traffic...well except for the last time.

I made the take off and the downwind but when I turned back into the wind, the plane went straight up and straight down so quickly I didn't have time to do anything but watch. It came straight down, into the windshield of the ONLY vehicle that came through the area while I was out there.

Needless to say, the damage is serious. I broke the entire nose of the fuselage just in front of the windshield.

Will silicone adhesive, the kind used in aquariums work on the styrofoam?

I think I can repair it but I will need to have something stronger than just glue. Whatever method I use, it will have to be strong enough to keep from pulling the broken nose off the plane. I have an idea. I'll be back with pics.

grubby out

FlyingMonkey
09-21-2007, 02:15 AM
Easy.

I use hotglue. It will be perfect for this type of repair.

Go to walmart, they have the mini glue guns for under 2 bucks. Buy a bag of the glue sticks. You'll be back in business!

Trust me, I do this ALL the time.

grubbyjeans
09-21-2007, 02:55 AM
Easy.

I use hotglue. It will be perfect for this type of repair.

Go to walmart, they have the mini glue guns for under 2 bucks. Buy a bag of the glue sticks. You'll be back in business!

Trust me, I do this ALL the time.
Oh the wife has LOTS of those.

Thanks

FlyingMonkey
09-21-2007, 03:07 AM
Careful!

The high temp hot glues could possibly melt the foam.

Test it in the center with a small amount first.

That way, if her glue gun is too hot, it just melts a spot in the middle.

flydiver
09-21-2007, 03:11 AM
Sumo (whiter, foams less) or Gorilla glue work also. Small toothpicks or bamboo skewer pieces in there for splints will help too.

fly.

Fly Time
09-21-2007, 03:49 AM
Your plane will be back in the air in no time! Any number of glues will work. CA (super glue) is the most common type of glue for repairs of this nature, but hot glue does indeed work quite well too. Especially if the break isn't clean. I have used Gorilla Glue too. It is strong, but not as quick to set. It also expands as it dries, which is sometimes good and sometimes not. Depends on the circumstances.

Here's a little bit of advice for your next flight: If the plane wants to rise, let it! Altitude is your friend. I have flown mine so high you can barely see it, so don't worry about putting some space between the SC and the ground. Up there, 2 or 3 times the height of the nearest tree of building, you can really get the feel for how she flies without having to worry about hitting anything. Also, wait until the wind dies down! (but you already knew that, right?)

Mostly, have fun!

FlyingMonkey
09-21-2007, 03:51 AM
CA will melt most foams.

You need a special foam safe CA in these cases.

FlyingMonkey
09-21-2007, 03:53 AM
I missed it the first read...
Did you do any damage to the car?

Gnascher
09-21-2007, 03:55 AM
Don't forget about 5 min. epoxy. That's good stuff for foam repairs too.

grubbyjeans
09-21-2007, 04:01 AM
I missed it the first read...
Did you do any damage to the car?

No, it didn't, and I was surprised because it came straight down and it doesn't have a spinner on the prop. shaft.

Fly Time
09-21-2007, 04:11 AM
CA will melt most foams.

You need a special foam safe CA in these cases.

Generally true, but Hobbyzone's foam is CA safe.

FlyingMonkey
09-21-2007, 10:55 AM
Don't forget about 5 min. epoxy. That's good stuff for foam repairs too.

yeah, but it's messy, and if you have a large repair like this one, it's half kicked before you have it all applied.

Fly Time
09-21-2007, 07:55 PM
Hot glue question for Fred: The one annoying thing about using hot glue is the spider-web strands of glue that form when you pull the glue gun away from the bead of glue you have just applied. Do you have a technique for avoiding that? Or do I just need more practice. And no, I'm not going to go breaking airframes just to glue them back together as you suggested in another thread - lol!

grubbyjeans
09-21-2007, 08:00 PM
Well we're airborne again. Thanks for all the suggestions as to what kind of glue I should use.

I have a couple of hot glue guns around here, but due to the size of the break, I decided not to use anything that acted too quickly and I didn't have any CA type adhesives around at 11:00pm.

I decided to try the silicone that I mentioned earlier. It allows precise alignment and is pliable enough to cover all the jags and crevices in the break.

Here are pics. I coated one side of the break with a liberal covering of the glue and worked it into alignment on the fuse. The pins on the back of the motor mount provided good alignment. I also coated them with the adhesive so they would give more strength to the bond.

I used the wing rubber bands to hold it together while it recuperated over night and this morning its all better.:D

I took it back out this morning, before the south Texas heat got the atmosphere boiling. The air was much calmer and flying was much easier.

Thanks for the suggestions.

grubby out

spitfire
09-21-2007, 09:51 PM
Easy.

I use hotglue. It will be perfect for this type of repair.

Go to walmart, they have the mini glue guns for under 2 bucks. Buy a bag of the glue sticks. You'll be back in business!

Trust me, I do this ALL the time.


I wonder why?:rolleyes:

Fly Time
09-21-2007, 10:10 PM
I wonder why?:rolleyes:

He doesn't actually crash his airplanes. He just breaks them in his shop so he can glue them back together again! :):):)

FlyingMonkey
09-21-2007, 11:56 PM
The spider webs are just a part of the hobby...

They do lessen as you get more experience.

Davidpal92
09-22-2007, 09:43 PM
glad to hear its flying again, have fun

nazgul
09-28-2007, 03:44 PM
Easy.

I use hotglue. It will be perfect for this type of repair.

Go to walmart, they have the mini glue guns for under 2 bucks. Buy a bag of the glue sticks. You'll be back in business!

Trust me, I do this ALL the time.
Just for the record I want to second the effectiveness of hot glue. I have used this on my SC since day 1 and it works like a charm! I use it to repair breaks, but it's also good for repairing nicks in the wing. Occasionally your foamy is going to get those ugly nicks from hard landings or accidental bumps from moving the plane around (or just having kids around :rolleyes:). Take a strip of tape (clear packing tape works for me) big enough to cover the nick and over lap it an inch on all sides. Apply the tape to the underside of the wing nick leaving about 3/4 of the strip of tape open on the top. You should have a cup around the cavity left by the nick. Carefully fill this cavity from the top with hot glue. Once the cavity is filled fold over and stick the rest of the tape to the wing (covering the hole you just used to apply the glue). This will mold the hot glue to the shape of the wing. Make sure there are no wrinkles in the tape that could cause uneven wrinkles or lumps once the glue is dried. Once the glue is dried (give it a couple hours just to be on the safe side) remove the tape, and your wing should now be free of any ugly nicks!:D

Glad to hear you are back in the sky again. :cool:

CustomCougar
09-28-2007, 06:37 PM
Just for the record I want to second the effectiveness of hot glue. I have used this on my SC since day 1 and it works like a charm! I use it to repair breaks, but it's also good for repairing nicks in the wing. Occasionally your foamy is going to get those ugly nicks from hard landings or accidental bumps from moving the plane around (or just having kids around :rolleyes:). Take a strip of tape (clear packing tape works for me) big enough to cover the nick and over lap it an inch on all sides. Apply the tape to the underside of the wing nick leaving about 3/4 of the strip of tape open on the top. You should have a cup around the cavity left by the nick. Carefully fill this cavity from the top with hot glue. Once the cavity is filled fold over and stick the rest of the tape to the wing (covering the hole you just used to apply the glue). This will mold the hot glue to the shape of the wing. Make sure there are no wrinkles in the tape that could cause uneven wrinkles or lumps once the glue is dried. Once the glue is dried (give it a couple hours just to be on the safe side) remove the tape, and your wing should now be free of any ugly nicks!:D

Glad to hear you are back in the sky again. :cool:


GREAT TIP. THANKS!

grubbyjeans
10-10-2007, 05:03 PM
Well, I guess its time for a second post in this thread...for me :o

I broke the SC again and this was another BAD one. I had been flying for about 20 minutes, long enough to drain both batteries and it was time to go in from playing. I had the plane in a good approach for a perfect landing. I only <S>missed</S> overlooked one thing...the curb.:eek:

I made the touch down but didn't get power off soon enough and coasted into the curb, which was low enough that the plane hit about 1/2in below the prop shaft.

The plane bounced over the curb and the landing gear took the full hit. The impact completely ripped the battery/receiver box out of the plane and broke the foam tabs that support the box.

I began the repair by marking a line where the box should sit and using that as a cut line. I extended the cut to completely remove the area where the battery door mounts. That foam was compressed and torn from the screws that had been there.

I then cut a piece of foam to fit the cut. You'll see in the pictures that the rear edge of the piece is thicker than it needs to be due to the curvature in the belly of the plane. I dealt with that issue after mounting the repair section.

I turned the plane over and marked the outline of the opening so I could determine where the battery box should be located, then drew the battery box profile on the piece.

Next step was to cut the opening for the battery box. With that done I hot glued the piece into the cut in the fuselage.

Now to mount the box. The front posts of the box are 1/2" and the rear are 3/8". I used my saw to shave the rear portion of the piece to match the original profile and the length of the screw posts at the rear of the box.

With the piece glued and shaped, I used one of the wife's craft tools to smooth the surface. It is called a "Bunny Burner" and in reality, is a soldering iron with wood burning tips. One of the tips is a disc about the size of a quarter and worked perfectly in smoothing the roughness from my saw and the excess hot glue. By just lightly tamping the foam and glue the surface was restored to near new condition.

After smoothing the surface I remounted the batter box, installed the receiver and tested. All is well. I'm ready to go flyin'.

The saw I used is called a "flush cut saw" and is used to cut dowels, used in furniture making, at the surface without marring the surface. The teeth have no "set", but are straight and have a knife cut to them so that they cut very cleanly. The saw is designed to use as a pull saw, making it very easy to follow a line because you pull the blade rather than push. That gives you total control of where you cut. I got it at Harbor Freight.

I had also added a camera mount a few days ago and while I'm in this area, here are the pics of that mod.

I cut a wedge the width of the cavity in the fuselage, 5/8" thick and 1 5/8" long. I hot glued it in the cavity and hot glued Velcro to that. It makes a perfect mount for the camera. I'll have some video in a few days.

One other thing. I'm discovering that my knack for scavenging is useful. I hope that my "foam" shipping container lasts long enough to get me past the "learning" stage. The final pic is a part that I made from the container that my camera was shipped in. :)

grubby

nazgul
10-10-2007, 05:16 PM
Nice job! Like the camera mount idea too.

flydiver
10-10-2007, 05:55 PM
Nice work.
I did some reinforcement on the battery box as a preventative. In those small foam tabs that stick inward (box removed) I glued some tiny carbon whiskers about 1/2" long to help support those. They are small and not well supported.

In the front of the box on the firewall I glued some 1mmx5mm carbon flat about an inch+ long. This provides a bit of a brace for the landing gear, at least in the forward direction. Not much you can do about backwards.

The battery box + landing gear + wing spars are kind of an impact zone with damage waiting to happen. All that force from the wings and landing goes right into the box.

fly

Airhead
10-10-2007, 06:03 PM
Good job,
Sorry to hear about your crash. You've done a good job with your repair..:)

grubbyjeans
10-11-2007, 06:32 AM
Well, we're airborne again. Here is my first aerial video. Sun was almost down so it is not as good as I'd like but I like the way the camera works when mounted in this fashion.

Since the camera is upside down, it is necessary to apply a couple of video effects to the avi. One is "vertical mirror" to get it inverted. Then "horizontal mirror" to get the right and left oriented correctly.

Here'tis: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_gpBCVCg1w :D

Airhead
10-11-2007, 06:43 AM
Well, we're airborne again. Here is my first aerial video. Sun was almost down so it is not as good as I'd like but I like the way the camera works when mounted in this fashion.

Since the camera is upside down, it is necessary to apply a couple of video effects to the avi. One is "vertical mirror" to get it inverted. Then "horizontal mirror" to get the right and left oriented correctly.

Here'tis: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_gpBCVCg1w :D
Hey Grubbyjeans,
that was very impressive...:ws: I have not done any of that video stuff. you did a great job with your repair, your flying and the video... keep up the good work..:ws:

grubbyjeans
10-11-2007, 02:47 PM
Hey Grubbyjeans,
that was very impressive...:ws: I have not done any of that video stuff. you did a great job with your repair, your flying and the video... keep up the good work..:ws:

Thanks airhead.
If you get out around Toney, stop in at The Fiero Factory (on hwy 53) and say Hi to Ed and Rosie. They are great folks and do some fantastic work on Fieros.