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CygnusX1
10-12-2007, 07:54 PM
I live near a pretty large lake which I would love to fly over. The only problem is that there are no grassy landing areas near the shore. What would it take to create enough flotation to land the Easy Glider safely on the water and taxi it to shore without impacting it's aeordynamics too badly? How would I position the floats on the plane correctly? Near the CG?

I would hand launch it and water land it.


Has anyone floated an Easy Glider Electric, intentionally?

Thanks,
Dave

Gnascher
10-12-2007, 09:25 PM
I live near a pretty large lake which I would love to fly over. The only problem is that there are no grassy landing areas near the shore. What would it take to create enough flotation to land the Easy Glider safely on the water and taxi it to shore without impacting it's aeordynamics too badly? How would I position the floats on the plane correctly? Near the CG?

I would hand launch it and water land it.


Has anyone floated an Easy Glider Electric, intentionally?

Thanks,
Dave

GWS floats (http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXHCR6&P=) are very inexpensive and easily adapted to most planes in that size class using some music wire, some plastic LG straps and a little ingenuity. They only weigh a few ounces and shouldn't impact you too badly. However they will add some more drag, so you'll reduce your soaring capabilities some. It's easy enough to fabricate a way to mount the floats so that they are removable though.

In terms of positioning ... the "step" of the float is typically positioned anywhere from right under the CG to about 1/2" in front. You'll want to get them as wide as is practical for stability on the water. The top of the floats is typically aligned parallel with the bottom of the wing.

These are "starting" parameters, you'll undoubtedly need to tweak step position and float angle for best performance as it is different on each plane, so make sure you accommodate some adjustment capability when you fabricate your mount.

Hand-launch to water landing is a good way to start. But it's also not to difficult to ROW with a little practice and enough power.

Incidentally, if you live in the snow-belt ... floats also work well on snow!

CygnusX1
10-12-2007, 09:38 PM
Thanks, for the advice! Yes, I plan on flying that same lake this Winter with snow or ice on it. I should have no trouble fabricating removable brackets for Summer grassy landings.

kawika1kalina
10-21-2007, 05:41 AM
Hi,

I added floatation to one of my AP "Bird of Time's". I can't taxi it into shore, but I haven't had to in the past 50 or so flites. I do keep a fishing rod handy just in case.

Here are some photos.

Dave

CygnusX1
10-21-2007, 06:20 AM
Wow that's a gorgeous plane and a beautiful area! I see why you can't taxi. The prop is too low to the water. Did you take any special precautions to keep water out of the motor and fuselage?

Thanks for the photos!

I LOVE this shot
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=45171&d=1192938275

-Dave

kawika1kalina
10-21-2007, 05:45 PM
Thank you,

I did a few modifications to keep it waterproof.

I mounted the motor on the outside of the firewall and sealed the wires passing through the top of the nose with silicon.

The canopy is taped all around to keep water out.

The wing saddle is sealed with 2 inch hockey tape.

The tail section is filled with ero-foam about 2 inches from the bellcrank to the back of the wing saddle. ( this was the trickiest part )

The three tubes running through the tail section that house the two control cables and antenna have been partly filled with vaseline paste to keep water from traveling through the cables.

The end of the antenna wire was sealed with nail polish.

And when I recovered the wings, rudder and tail, I did a wider overlap then there was on the original covering.

Some of this may be overkill, but I haven't seen even a moleclue of water inside yet.

The plane flies great with the added wieght of the camera and floats.
With each flight I take 240 pictures at ten seconds apart. With two minutes to get up and another three to land, my shortest flight is 45 minutes. But I usualy play around a bit after the camera is done it's job.

The farthest I have travelled following the plane by boat is about ten miles, without powering up the motor, I don't know how far this plane could go in a straight line with a full battery.

I think any sailplane would make a good lake lander with the right mods.

Dave

CygnusX1
10-21-2007, 09:13 PM
Thanks for the list of water proofing. Simply amazing! I can't wait to try out the water landings. By the time I get my plane ready for water, the lake might be frozen though. :-) I will have to land on hard water instead.