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flyranger
11-22-2005, 12:14 PM
Found a plan in *.dxf format for "smbipe" online. Everything looks straightforward except for the method of attaching the turtle deck struts to the fuse and wing and the cabane struts to the upper and lower wing. I've never tried a biplane before and wondered what is the technique used?

Dereck
11-23-2005, 03:16 PM
Found a plan in *.dxf format for "smbipe" online. Everything looks straightforward except for the method of attaching the turtle deck struts to the fuse and wing and the cabane struts to the upper and lower wing. I've never tried a biplane before and wondered what is the technique used?

Number of techniques used is probably on a level with the number of bipe designers!

There's a great book on bipes in the "Harry Higley" series - not sure who publishes them, but I've even seen Higley's in hobby shops. Shouldn't be too hard to dig them up.

Your pdf - looks like the top wing is banded onto rails atop the CS struts. Struts are often music wire bent to run along hardwood transverse rails between the fus sides, or I've seen them run along the fus sides themselves. Can be either bound / epoxied onto the structure, or slipped into brass tubes glued in place - the latter makes it easier to cover the fuselage as you can remove the CS struttery.

Interplane struts are even more fun - for starters, are they decorative or structural? Structural is not much harder than decorative, and makes them work for a living. But I've designed and flown a succesful bipe where the wing interplane struts were actually #64 rubber bands stretched between hooks in the wings...

Sometimes you can get ideas off the plans printed at small scale in mags, but the tendency with modern mags is to print only part of a plan. A lot depends on the model size and weight - you can get away with a lot at 36" span, 20-odd ounce weight. Move to a 5- 10lb scale bipe and you're better off just making a smaller version of the full-size with full working struts and rigging - none of which were there for fun on the real thing.

The pay-off - there's little in the sky to beat a biplane just ambling past!

Good luck with the project

Regards
Dereck

flyranger
11-24-2005, 02:42 PM
Many thanks, Dereck!! I checked amazon for Harry Higleys "Bipes" and it is out of print....shucks. I am staying with the park flyer size at the moment. Don't want to build something too large for my flying areas! Also to keep the cost down. Have an outrunner/lipo combo that will be good to about 20oz. Hopefully, by judicious building, I can come in under that weight.

Dereck
11-24-2005, 05:24 PM
Many thanks, Dereck!! I checked amazon for Harry Higleys "Bipes" and it is out of print....shucks. I am staying with the park flyer size at the moment. Don't want to build something too large for my flying areas! Also to keep the cost down. Have an outrunner/lipo combo that will be good to about 20oz. Hopefully, by judicious building, I can come in under that weight.

I might have a copy someplace. If you can get in touch with me direct, it could be worth your while...

D

Electrick
11-24-2005, 08:48 PM
http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/hig/higbok015.htm

Rick

Dereck
11-24-2005, 10:01 PM
I googled up a couple of hobby shops that seemed to have copies, but this silly reply box won't let me cut and paste into it for some reason.

Go to Google, type in "Harry Higley's Bipes Book" and go for it.

It has to be one of the best on the subject, though Gordon Whitehead's book on Practical Scale Models did this as well, and much more besides.

But if you can get hold of Gordon's book in the US now, good on you. Though I understand that much of it may have been in the last 10 issues of Flying Scale Models from MAP in England...

When it comes down to it, paper mags and books ain't dead yet, by a long way. :)

D