PDA

View Full Version : WWI plane building tips


WWI Ace
11-30-2007, 03:03 AM
Hey guys! Lets use this space to help each other with building tips. I'll start by saying that I framed up my 24"ws Fokker tripe using a cork bulletin board from Wal Mart as a building board. It works great for small planes and the wood frame helps insure that your building on a flat surface. The pins are really easy to push in too!!! Steve.

Biplane Murphy
11-30-2007, 03:49 AM
I use a sheet of soundproofing board that came in a 4' x 8' sheet....can't remember what it is called.....works good though.

gfdengine204
11-30-2007, 03:52 AM
Steve,

I would be concerned the cork may sag in the middle, and not provide a totally flat surface. DO you support it at all? If it was me, I would consider removing the frame and just using the cork, given it is on an already flat surface (like a door or good flat tabletop).

Just a thought.

FlyingMonkey
11-30-2007, 04:11 AM
acoustic ceiling tile is supposed to work well

gfdengine204
11-30-2007, 04:13 AM
I haven't used it yet, but I have a 2ftX4ft sheet of sheetrock, and a solid wood door to put in my shop. Can't get much more flat than those.

BradT
11-30-2007, 06:42 AM
I used a sheet of 2" blue foam insulation, about 2' x 6', on top of a solid core door as a building table when I framed up my big 75" DVII. I placed the door on a plywood bench, set in the room so that I could access both of the long sides and one end of the work surface. It made the build easier by not having to turn large wings and a long fuselage around on the table; I could just walk to the other side to work on it. The foam insulation took pins very well, and lay very flat on the door, so everything came out straight and true.

Since the DVII frame was almost all stick built, making for many small joints at odd angles between the sticks, I found that the miter cutting tool and miter sanding frame made by Four Square tools were invaluable aids in getting tight joints.

Brad.

WWI Ace
11-30-2007, 06:03 PM
You guys have alot of good ideas!!! Steve

FlyingMonkey
11-30-2007, 06:22 PM
I think some painting and finishing tips for some of these birds would be excellent.

I have heard one way of getting that pastel camo pattern is to use three sponges, each cut for the shape of each color, and just start dabbing...

But, how to get the tiger striping, where to get the precolored covering, etc, would be very helpful.

WWI Ace
12-01-2007, 02:02 AM
Yeah Flyingmonkey! I started a thread in our WWI Era section on the streaky camo finish. I'm curious as to the different ways to accomplish the WWI paint jobs. Steve.

WWI Ace
12-01-2007, 02:06 AM
What materials do you guys like to use for rigging and how do you use these materials? Steve

FlyingMonkey
12-01-2007, 02:08 AM
unwaxed floss and spyderwire brand fishing line are the two I know about...

WWI Ace
12-01-2007, 02:22 AM
I've used elastic beading cord from Wal Mart's craft section and it looks good on 36"ws planes. They also make some kind of beading cord in the same section that comes in brown and black. It looks alot like real leather. I used that for the cockpit coaming on my little tripe. Steve

WWI Ace
12-02-2007, 07:36 PM
I read something the other day that said to run your pull-pull lines through glass beads. It's supposed to be lighter and have less friction. Steve.

scalercflyer
12-05-2007, 01:42 AM
Guys, I bought this 4" table saw with a smooth diamond coated blade from Harbor Freight Tools and I love it! It makes the smoothest, straightest cuts you ever saw. I have the 4" sander too. Only thing about the 4" saw is that it vibrates at high speeds. Try it. You'll love it! Martin PS I have a dead level 6 foot by 30" workbench with a fiber board screwed to it. Works great! Pics shortly.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/gifs/clear.gif

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=93211

scalercflyer
12-05-2007, 01:51 AM
Try this technique sometime Boys. Take an old wallet or shoe tongue and cut it into a long thin strip (old wallets and shoe tongues are very soft and flexible). Use a small piece of tubing or something equivalent to stuff it. Starting at one end of the cockpit, lay the leather over the sides of the body and begin sewing it to the body of the plane. Use even stitches so it looks nice. Glue the ends together with a small drop of CA. Try it! There's nothing like real leather for cockpit coaming! It looks really cool! Also there is no slime blowing on it to ruin it too. Martin

scalercflyer
12-05-2007, 01:57 AM
Yeah Steve, when you're done with making your necklaces out of glass beads in your Texican over the hill classes, :eek::D you can always share the rest with us if you have any left over! HA HA!!! LOL :D:p:) Martin

WWI Ace
12-05-2007, 02:13 AM
I traded all my extra beads to the indians for airplanes!!! Steve

FlyingMonkey
12-05-2007, 03:41 AM
ahem, it's indigenous people.

gfdengine204
12-05-2007, 03:56 AM
ahem, it's indigenous people.

How DARE you suddenly get all PC on us......

Bad monkey, no banana!

FlyingMonkey
12-05-2007, 08:28 AM
crabzilla says it to me all the time...

gfdengine204
12-05-2007, 01:22 PM
crabzilla says it to me all the time...

Are we still talking about fruit here?

FlyingMonkey
12-05-2007, 01:24 PM
I think that would be crab apple.

which has nothing to do with WWI plane building tips, so we won't go any further with it, at this time, at this place.

Now, you waned to talk about a great place to get WWI aircraft info...

I listen to podcasts. One of them is History According to Bob.

One of his episodes, he did a lecture about the building materials of full scale WWI aircraft. It was a very, very interesting listen.

WWI Ace
12-05-2007, 11:53 PM
Anybody seen the new square carbon fiber rods from Midwest with the round holes down the middle? I wonder if they would make good wing spars? Steve

FlyingMonkey
12-06-2007, 12:30 AM
building tip......

watch videos about WWI

http://www.history.com/media.do?id=dogfights_spad13_broadband&action=clip

gfdengine204
12-06-2007, 01:17 AM
Anybody seen the new square carbon fiber rods from Midwest with the round holes down the middle? I wonder if they would make good wing spars? Steve


Steve,

Weren't those pushrod guides (the square part) and the round rod that fit the inside was the pushrod? That was the ad I saw for them.

I suppose you could use them for wing spars though. But, I would think a round spar would be stronger than a square one; the square spar would have natural weak areas on all four corners, whereas the round spar tube is strong all the way around (no such weak spots).

WWI Ace
12-06-2007, 03:12 AM
I'm not really sure if they're just for pushrods or not. I would think that since they were round inside it would make the I.D a little thicker thus making them stronger. Steve

scalercflyer
12-07-2007, 12:59 AM
Thanks for the nice History Channel website Flying Monkey! I watched a few and book marked it for later. I really enjoyed it. Martin

Hedlro
01-29-2008, 02:27 PM
Hi Guys,

On the subject of rigging, I am currently building a 40" Sopwith Pup and was wondering what the best method of fixing the rigging was? What is the best thing to use, fishing line? How do you fix it ie is it one long piece that lops round to provide strength or is is seperate pieces? How do you keep the tension on it so it doesn't buzz when the wind is passing it in flight?

Sorry about all the questions, I am not greedy, I just like alot!;-)

Some close up pics of how you guys have acheived the above would be good. Cheeky I know but you don't get if you don't ask:roll:

Rob

degreen60
01-29-2008, 03:10 PM
Hi Guys,

On the subject of rigging, I am currently building a 40" Sopwith Pup and was wondering what the best method of fixing the rigging was? What is the best thing to use, fishing line? How do you fix it ie is it one long piece that lops round to provide strength or is is seperate pieces? How do you keep the tension on it so it doesn't buzz when the wind is passing it in flight?

Sorry about all the questions, I am not greedy, I just like alot!;-)

Some close up pics of how you guys have acheived the above would be good. Cheeky I know but you don't get if you don't ask:roll:

Rob

I use upholster thread. I like to tie it one side then run it to the other side so the tension is equal on both wings. I tie the thread to one side then pull the tension at the other side and clamp the thread so it can not slip while I tie the knot. I never fasten the thread to the fuselage so I can remove wings without cutting the thread. Sometimes where the thread has to run under the fuselage I will put a thin piece of plastic(liter bottle) there to hold the thread when the wings are removed. I have one plane that the flying wire runs to the fuselage forward of the wing. I have a piece of plastic that is held on with the landing gear that the thread is attached to.

degreen60
01-29-2008, 03:24 PM
Here is a picture of my MS-L with all the brace wires. The wires are only for show the wing is quite stiff on this plane. The wires are made of only 2 pieces of thread. They are held tight with 4 springs that unhook to remove the wing. There are plastic tubes in the wings for the thread to run through. The upper support had a U shape to hold the thread while I was running it. After the thread was run I closed the U so the thread can not come off the support. The thread is only fastened at the springs with knots on the end of the thread. The thread is looped through the springs twice without being fastened. This way if anything catches on the thread the spring will give.

WWI Ace
01-29-2008, 06:00 PM
Some guys use the brass swivels used for fishing to make removable attachment points for rigging. Steve

snrkld
01-29-2008, 08:13 PM
I use a ceiling tile tape around the ends to keep it from fraying and leaving any trace that you worked on your plane in the kitchen!

7car7
01-30-2008, 06:37 PM
I like to attach the wires to the fuse, but I use a metal hook to attach with. I just make a hook from pushrod wire.

I really like to use the braided fishing line. Lot's of brands, one is spyder wire. The SE5a has 50# test, the TM is using 15 or 30 - rediculously strong.

degreen60 mentioned upholstery thread, that's nice stuff too. It's more stretchy than the fishing thread, (just a little) so just depends on what you want.

Here's a picture, it's not zoomed into this area, but you can see the hooks I made I hope...

7car7
02-22-2008, 05:20 PM
I've been wanting a good pilot scarf for a while, and couldn't figure out what to use that would look semi-scale!

I found it! A plastic shopping bag from the grocery store works great! And it's free!

It's a bit stiff, so it won't lay down when sitting still, because the scarf still goes straight back. But when it's going through the air, it looks normal.

:tc:

degreen60
02-22-2008, 08:56 PM
I've been wanting a good pilot scarf for a while, and couldn't figure out what to use that would look semi-scale!

I found it! A plastic shopping bag from the grocery store works great! And it's free!

It's a bit stiff, so it won't lay down when sitting still, because the scarf still goes straight back. But when it's going through the air, it looks normal.

:tc:

I am going to try this for the pennants on the wing struts of my camel.

I watched an old movie made in 1938 about WW1 flying with Errol Flynn "Dawn Patrol". Some of the pilots in it had a scarf flying from the top of thier cap. I haven't see any pictures of WW1 pilot with a scarf on the top of the cap. Was this just Hollywood? I did like watching the old planes in the movie.