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schackel
02-11-2008, 08:12 PM
Hi,

Im new here and in electric scale RC plane building as well.
I want to build my models in 1/33nd scale.

I need some tips for what components - motors, batteries, receivers, servos, speedcontrol etc., i.e anything that is needed in the plane to get it to the air - are advisable to be used.
Why Id prefer 1/33rd scale :

I have a huge collection of scale paper models which i could use as a basis for my models.

Thanks !

Schackel

Murocflyer
02-11-2008, 08:22 PM
Hi,

Im new here and in electric scale RC plane building as well.
I want to build my models in 1/33nd scale.

I need some tips for what components - motors, batteries, receivers, servos, speedcontrol etc., i.e anything that is needed in the plane to get it to the air - are advisable to be used.
Why Id prefer 1/33rd scale :

I have a huge collection of scale paper models which i could use as a basis for my models.

Thanks !

Schackel


Schackel,

Welcome to WF!

That's a tall order you have there. Best advice I can give you is to read, read, read, and post specific question on things you don't quite understand.

To help us help you, can you tell us a little more about yourself? How long have you been flying, building experience, what building materials do you like, balsa or (gasp) foam. Stuff like that.

Here are some links that have proved useful to me (there are many, many more):

Sports Aviator: http://www.masportaviator.com/ (http://www.masportaviator.com/)

RC Battery Clinic: http://www.rcbatteryclinic.com/ (http://www.rcbatteryclinic.com/)

Pull/Pull flight control setup info: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=615748 (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=615748)

Scale conversion calculator: http://www.jimbobwan.com/scalcalc.htm (http://www.jimbobwan.com/scalcalc.htm)

Material Weights: http://www.qnet.com/~skif/weight.html (http://www.qnet.com/~skif/weight.html)

Useful info: http://www.qnet.com/~skif/rcmain.html (http://www.qnet.com/~skif/rcmain.html)

RCGroups FAQs: http://www.ezonemag.com/pages/faq/intro.shtml (http://www.ezonemag.com/pages/faq/intro.shtml)

Amp Aviators: http://www.ampaviators.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=14&Itemid=32 (http://www.ampaviators.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=14&Itemid=32)

Link City: http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14117 (http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14117)

Hope that helps,

Frank

schackel
02-13-2008, 10:59 AM
Schackel,

Welcome to WF!

That's a tall order you have there. Best advice I can give you is to read, read, read, and post specific question on things you don't quite understand.

To help us help you, can you tell us a little more about yourself? How long have you been flying, building experience, what building materials do you like, balsa or (gasp) foam. Stuff like that.


Frank
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Well Frank,

first of all thanks for your reply. Its been the only one. but that doesnt matter - sometimes less can be more...

Well, some details.

I am an absolute newcomer. My intention is, as I already said, to turn some of my 1/33rd scale paper models into flying planes. Simply because I have enough of them resp. can obtain lots anywhere and dont have to scale up/down any drawings and plans.
1/33 is a scale big enough to show a detailed plane but small enough to build more than one w/o wasting too much space in the hobbyroom...
My building expereinces are big and wide ranged throughout all kinds of modeling and modeling materials / tools, machines, excl. RC modeling. RC cars - yes, ships, yes, but not planes. And especially not such tiny RC planes as Id prefer to build and fly.

My basic questions are

- am I right with my idea about this scale ?
- how much can an electric plane in this scale weigh ( I mean a plane with full 3D fuselage etc, not a flat "thingie" ) to be able to fly ?
- What are advisable motors/servos/batteries/receivers for this purpose/scale size ?


regards,

Roland

buzzltyr
02-13-2008, 12:14 PM
Hi Roland,
I'm glad Frank responded to your first post. 1/33rd scale is going to be a challenge, I'd think. Obviously, the size, wingspan and weight are going to be determined by the size of the original.

Let's take one of the most modeled planes, a P-51D Mustang. The full size had a wingspan of 37 feet, so 1/33 puts you at a little over 12 inches for a wingspan. At that size, and to create a flyable model, you are looking at micro equipment, and the model is going to need to be weighed in grams, not ounces. There are forums here and on rcgroups.com dedicated to indoor and micro models, where you could get more expert advice than I can give regarding weights, equipment, etc. You might also do an internet search on peanut and pistachio scale models, as these small planes have been around for years as rubber band powered models, and there are lots of plans (and some kits) out there for them.

Recent advances in technology have resulted in very small brushless outrunner motors, very lightweight and small servos (or more likely for this size, magnetic actuators), and lightweight receivers (you could look at the Plantraco systems).

But I think I'd start by looking at the indoor/micro forums to get some background on what others are doing, and what is readily available.

Mark

jb48
02-13-2008, 12:32 PM
Hi Roland,
You choose a very small scale for your first rc projects, airplanes about 12 to 15 inch wingspan, around 4 0z weight. It can be done using the lightest materials and the smallest receivers, servos, motors, esc and batteries available. As for Giant scale, you are in a highly specialized zone, just the other way around. Find an instructor to help you learn rc flying if you don`t want to rebuild after each flight. May I suggest you a RTF plane in this size and easy enough to learn to fly with greatest chance of success? The Parkzone Cessna Centurion 210. At less than 1 oz, this plane has not enough mass to self destruck on most impacts, its speed is slow enough and it has good control: I maidened one last Sunday for a friend and I was impressed by this tiny package.

Sky Sharkster
02-14-2008, 02:41 AM
Hello Schackel. Welcome to Wattflyer!
Frank, Mark and JB have given you some good advice, I'll just add a few comments.
The type models you're describing are generally called "Micro" or "Sub-Micro" models and are a fairly recent trend, made possible by the development of small electric motors and support equipment like batteries, servos and receivers.
Since it is a new trend, equipment is somewhat costly and the selection is a bit limited.
I would not advise any new flyer to start out with these models; They are very demanding to build, tricky to fly and quite expensive.
My recommendation is to try either a reliable ARF model or, if you are determined to build a model from kit or scratch, use a quality, proven design and make a model that is close to the "standard" size, like the popular "Speed 400" models, which is about 1/12 scale.
From this (a kit or scratch) you will develop building skills for future models, a knowledge of R/C components, battery use and care, and electronic devices that, again, can be later used on a smaller design.
The transmitter can be used for future models, but the "airborne pack" of RX, servos, will be MUCH cheaper and easier to use.
This investment will not be wasted; If you fly a trainer, any mishaps will be easier to fix and less costly to replace.
Then, you will be in a much better position to decide whether you want to try micro models. You may end up with several size and type models; Most of us do.
But by starting out with such a demanding (micro) scale, it could easily end in frustration, an expensive lesson that could be avoided.
If you decide to build a kit, I recommend any of the models from;
http://www.laserartco.com/
http://www.stevensaero.com/shop/home.php
For a better idea of the "Micro" world, try this site;
http://www.smallflyingarts.com/index.html
And some of the equipment for micros;
http://www.falconmodels.uk.com/acatalog/index.html
http://www.bsdmicrorc.com/
Good Luck!
Ron