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dcfreefall
08-09-2005, 07:19 PM
Anyone own a Hitec Flash 5 Radio? I am looking for a good radio I can grow into. Any other suggestions.

Dave:rolleyes:

Reformed Nitroaddict
08-09-2005, 07:23 PM
I have also been getting ready to upgrade. Based on my research and the recommendations of others, there are several radios that are reasonably priced and give all the features needed for growing into:

Hitec Optic 6
JR 6102
Hitec Eclipse 7
Futaba 6EXAS
Futaba CAP7

dee-grose
08-09-2005, 07:23 PM
I've got a Flash 5 and love it. I actually just bought an Optic 6, but haven't flown much with it yet. The Flash is a good radio.

dee

EpoweredRc
08-09-2005, 07:31 PM
I have also been getting ready to upgrade. Based on my research and the recommendations of others, there are several radios that are reasonably priced and give all the features needed for growing into:

Hitec Optic 6
JR 6102
Hitec Eclipse 7
Futaba 6EXAS
Futaba CAP7

The Hitec Eclipse is a great radio my father has one with who knows how many of hours of flying on it.I fly a old Hitec Prism and it works great to I have been looking at the optic 6 as the Hitac is my fathers and I need a radio for myself.Looks like a pretty good one.Futaba not really sure about with a lot he problems with the cell phones and the TX getting hit at least the ones with the syseizer(sp?) modules in them.

AEAJR
08-10-2005, 03:43 AM
Anyone own a Hitec Flash 5 Radio? I am looking for a good radio I can grow into. Any other suggestions.

Dave:rolleyes:

Prices - read the description - The range in the start of the group is for the
radio alone. Packages can vary greatly depending on what is incluced. Most
radios come packaged with standard size servos and receivers. These packages
may not be suitable for electric flyers or small gliders. If I see a package
with small servos and receiver, I note the link for the benefit of these
flyers.

Unless noted otherwise, all radios have Low Battery Warning, Digital Trims,
Timers, End Point Adjustment, Dual Rates and Exponential on Ch1&2; some
include Ch 4. All include elevon and V-tail mixes. Unless stated otherwise
radios do not have support for 4 wing servos or split elevator servos.

This article may be useful in understanding the features I mention here and
their value.

Radio Systems Part 2 - Computer Radios - The right choice for almost everyone
http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=65 (http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=65)


Entry level Computer Radios 5/6 channel - approx $90-110
If your focus in on parkflyers, RES sailplanes, aileron sailplanes or 4-5
channel glow planes, these are very capable for the price. In addition to the
basic 4 channels they have retract, flap and/or split aileron capabilities.
These make great first radios for the committed new pilot, providing features
beyond the 4 channel "standard" radios at a small incremental investment. For
many pilots, these may be all the radio they will need for years. They will
fly more advanced planes, like full house sailplanes or aerobatic planes, but
may
not be able to bring out all the plane can offer.

Hitec Flash 5SX -
http://www.hitecrcd.com/Radios/Flash5.htm (http://www.hitecrcd.com/Radios/Flash5.htm)
http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXRT20**&P=7 (http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXRT20**&P=7)
This package has small servos and receiver suitabale for electric flyers. The
is a less expensive package available with larger servos and reciever but not
appropriate to small models.
5 Channel, 5 Model Memory, Ch 1/5 provide dual ailerons management for
Flapper, Flaps on 3 way switch or Throttle Stick. Aileron-Rudder mix. No
user defined mixes.

Futaba EXAS -
http://www.futaba-rc.com/radios/futk55.html (http://www.futaba-rc.com/radios/futk55.html)
http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/article_display.cfm?article_id=82 (http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/article_display.cfm?article_id=82)
http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXJUV7**&P=ML (http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXJUV7**&P=ML)
6 channels, 6-model memory, Prop Flaps chi 6, Flapperon using 1/6, 1 user
defined mix. The particular package I have listed at tower comes with micro
servos and receiver suitable for parkflyers

Airtronics VG 6000
http://www.airtronics.net/VG6000.htm (http://www.airtronics.net/VG6000.htm)
http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXEUY5**&P=7 (http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXEUY5**&P=7)
This particular package is one of the few I have seen packaged specifically
for the small electric flyer. Comes with two small servos and an ESC. 6
channels, 4 model memories, 6 standard mixes, no user definable mix
capability listed. I can't find any info on the range of the receiver in this
package so I must assume it is around 1000 feet. Suitable for low speed
parkflyers only, unless I can find more range info. Seems to have a
limitation in how flapperons are implemented. See post #25 in this thread:
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=327855&page=2#post4045771 (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=327855&page=2#post4045771)



Mid Range Computer Radios 6/7 Channels Approx $130-180 for the radio.
These radios provide a richer feature set than the entry level computer
radios, primarily in more model memories, more surface mixes and switch
assignability. These radios can bring out more of the capabilities of more
advanced planes and give you set-up options the entry level computer radios
lack.

Comparison Chart -( provided by Hitec )
http://hitecrcd.com/Radios/Optic%206%20comparison%20chart.htm (http://hitecrcd.com/Radios/Optic 6 comparison chart.htm)

Hitec Optic 6
http://www.hitecrcd.com/Radios/OPTIC.htm (http://www.hitecrcd.com/Radios/OPTIC.htm)
review
http://www.rcgroups.com/links/index.php?t=article&cat=281&id=4451 (http://www.rcgroups.com/links/index.php?t=article&cat=281&id=4451)
6 channel, 8 Model Memory, Model naming, Spectra channel synth option, Change
channel module, shift select, switch assignability, flight modes, 2 user
programmable mixes, and a variety of standard mixes.

Futaba 7C
http://www.futaba-rc.com/radios/futj69.html (http://www.futaba-rc.com/radios/futj69.html)
Review
http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/article_display.cfm?article_id=321 (http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/article_display.cfm?article_id=321)
Review - also compares it to the 9C, the 6XAS and the JR 6102
http://www.rcgroups.com/links/index.php?id=4405 (http://www.rcgroups.com/links/index.php?id=4405)
7 channels, 10 Model Memory, Model Naming, Switch Assignability, Flight Modes,
3 user programmable mixes and a selection of standard mixes.

JR 6102
http://www.horizonhobby.com/Shop/ByCategory/Product/Default.aspx?ProdID=JRP6664 (http://www.horizonhobby.com/Shop/ByCategory/Product/Default.aspx?ProdID=JRP6664)**
Review
http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/article_display.cfm?article_id=305 (http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/article_display.cfm?article_id=305)
This is a futaba 7C review, but the author compares it to the JR near the end
of the article. May be helpful if you are trying to compare the two.
http://www.rcgroups.com/links/index.php?id=4405 (http://www.rcgroups.com/links/index.php?id=4405)
6 channels, 10 model Memory, model naming, selectable switch locations,
Direct Servo Connect (DSC), 4 user programmable mixes, a variety of standard
mixes,

Airtronics RD6000 Super
http://www.airtronics.net/RD6000_Super.htm (http://www.airtronics.net/RD6000_Super.htm)
6 channel, 8 model memory, Good selection of standard mixes. Appears to have
two user definable mixes

dcfreefall
08-10-2005, 01:47 PM
Thanks everyone for all the information. I am planning on only flying smaller planes. I like to be able to fly around the house.
With all of the radios, please remember I am new at this, don't you need to buy servos and recievers for each plane, which then you would be able to buy bigger servos and better recievers that would work with the radio. Am I correct in stating this. Maybe I should explain a little more of the situation. I am looking to buy a combat wing XE2 that comes completely built with the Flash 5 radio. I simply wanted the option to then add a few more planes to the radio so I would have more options of flying.

What is the deal with adding planes to a radio? If you get the reciever and servos that will work with the radio you can put them into any plane that would hold those, correct?

Dave:rolleyes:

AEAJR
08-10-2005, 02:36 PM
Thanks everyone for all the information. I am planning on only flying smaller planes. I like to be able to fly around the house.
With all of the radios, please remember I am new at this, don't you need to buy servos and recievers for each plane, which then you would be able to buy bigger servos and better recievers that would work with the radio. Am I correct in stating this. Maybe I should explain a little more of the situation. I am looking to buy a combat wing XE2 that comes completely built with the Flash 5 radio. I simply wanted the option to then add a few more planes to the radio so I would have more options of flying.

What is the deal with adding planes to a radio? If you get the reciever and servos that will work with the radio you can put them into any plane that would hold those, correct?

Dave:rolleyes:
Ahhhh, very very different quesiton. Thanks for clarifying your question.

Flash 5 will be wonderful for that application. Buy with confidence.

I fly thermal duration sailplanes, slope gliders and electrics. Many pilots use the Flash 5 SX radio for all types of planes. It is quite versitle.

I assume it is a Hitec Flash 5SX. This model has 5 model memories so you can set up 5 different planes, each with a unique set-up and just switch between them based on a menu selection. Great system.

It is possible to fly more than 5 planes. IF you carefully set up two planes to have exactly the same set-up they can share the same set-up in the radio.

At one time my Spirit and Sagitta 600 2M gliders shared a memory spot on my Hitec Prism 7X. Only had 3 memory locations. I have since added another radio so they each have their own profiles and I don't have to worry about keeping them in synch.

When you are ready to add your second plane you will buy the appropriate number of servos of the appropriate size. Some planes want big servos and some want tiny servos, so the choice is unique to each plane.

It is a pain to move servos from plane to plane if you plan to fly both planes on a regular basis, so assume you will keep the servos in each plane that you plan to fly. Of course once you decide to not fly it any more you can take them out and use them in another plane.

Likewise each plane needs a receiver. However, depending on your set-up, moving receivers is not too bad. I don't do it and I don't know anyone who does, but if you put in an antenna tube to make it easy to feed in the antenna, and you use Velcro or some other removeable mount system, you can move the receiver around to save $20-$100 per plane.

If you fly electric planes, you will need a speed control per plane and will generally not move them around although you could.

You can buy these all individually. There are also prepackaged sets called flight packs that have a combination of these components that the manufacturers believe will meet the needs of many pilots and planes. They are convenient and there is a bit of a discount usually associated with buying the flight pack as opposed to all the individual pieces. On the other hand sometimes they include stuff you don't need, so you have to judge which is the best path.

You need battery power for each plane. Batteries can be dedicated to a plane, or they can be moved around. Most pilots who fly planes with electric motors will have several battery packs for each plane so they can fly while they charge. And in many cases the same battery packs can be shared among planes. I do that a lot!

If you have rechargeable batteries in your radio, the charger will come with the radio. It usually has a lead that can be used to charge a receiver pack that would be used in a gas, glow or glider type plane where the battery only powers the servos and receiver.

For electric motor planes, you will need a charger for your motor batteries. The radio charger is not appropriate for this task.

If you select the right charger, one charger can charge more than one type and size of battery. Many electic pilots have more than one charger, depending on how agressive they want to be about staying in the air, but you typically only need one. ( I have 3 :D )

About Brands:

Brands don't generally have to match. 99% of all new servos can be plugged into 99% of all new receivers.

In your case, Hitec has a great selection of very affordable recivers so I would encourage you to use Hitec receivers for your Hitec radio. However any reciever that is marked Hitec/futaba compatible or Negative shift will work with it as long as they are 72 MHZ recievers. 75 MHZ is for cars and boats and won't work with your radio.

Batteries and speed controls can have variety of connectors so this can get messy. If you are handy with a soldering iron, it is easly addressed, but cross that bridge when you come to it.

I hope that helps answer your questions.

These three articles may also be helpful.

The Radio - The Pilots Cockpit
http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=59 (http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=59)

Radio Systems Part 1 - Standard Radios
http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=44 (http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=44)

Radio Systems Part 2 - Computer Radios - A Better Investment
http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=65 (http://www.rcezine.com/cms/article.php?cat=&id=65)

Welcome to RC flying. You are in for a lot of fun!

Darrell_F
08-10-2005, 03:03 PM
I have two Flash 5's and they are very good radios and great value for what they cost. The Flash 5 was my first radio and I highly recommend it for a beginner. Electronic trim, EPA, dual rates, exponential, and model memory are really nice, but it is very limited on mixing which you will want when you get to intermediate planes.

If I were starting new today I would probably get the Hitec Optic 6. I don't think you'll outgrown the Flash 5 any time soon, but you will eventually. It's taken me about two years. I want to move into sailplanes and the Flash 5 does not allow user mixes; i.e., elevator to spoilers. If you want to fly 3D, you'll also need more mix functions as well.

I think a number of Flash 5 owners are going for the new Optic 6, so you can get a good deal on a used Flash Five. I picked up a second one, used, but like new for $50. They show up frequently on EBay.

dee-grose
08-10-2005, 03:51 PM
Darrell's right...the Flash 5 will be fine for what you're wanting to do, but the Optic 6 is a better choice for a first radio these days. I got an Optic 6 for a couple of reasons: 1. more model memories and 2. greater flexibility of options/mixes. I'm keeping my Flash 5 so I can have a total of 11 planes in memory.

Sounds like he's getting a plane that comes with a Flash 5 already, so I guess there really isn't a question. The Flash 5 is a good radio. As Ed has pointed out, it is very capable.

dee

dcfreefall
08-10-2005, 05:55 PM
Again, thank you all for your advise.:) I am looking forward to getting more involved and into more planes.