PDA

View Full Version : Turnigy 40 A Plush ESC


Toddy86
09-09-2008, 12:36 AM
Hi All,

I recently bought a Turnigy 40A Plush ESC for my T28 Trojan. The stock ESC was 25A but it burnt out and I thought I would get a bigger capacity to stop that happening again.

My question is this, the stock motor has a blue, black and red wire to conect to the ESC but the Turnighy ESC has 3 red wires (doh!!!). They are labelled A, B & C. Does anyone know which goes with which?

Also, can I damage anything with a 'trial and error' or will the motor just go the wrong way if I get it wrong? (I am presuming the middle wire on the motor goes with the middle wire on the ESC (B) so after that its 50-50.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Cheers,

Toddy

tzyoung
09-09-2008, 01:55 AM
The controller does not care which three wires are connected to the motor. If it spins the wrong way just switch two of the motor wires to reverse the direction. Switching motor wires won't damage anything just make sure and unplug the battery first.

Good Luck
-Trent

cjg
10-06-2008, 11:24 PM
I use the same esc in my t-28 for the same reason. You will like it. Did you get the programming card? It was worth the extra few bucks.

furn1593
10-08-2008, 11:37 PM
I have one also, satisifed with it... im interested on the dirrerent timing modes and when to use what.. any info would be helpful.

cjg
10-08-2008, 11:42 PM
I asked the same timing question on another forum. I ended up just using the medium and seems to fly fine with no overheating.

Toddy86
10-09-2008, 03:54 AM
I did get the programming card but I have no idea what was what so I just went with the defaults, I too would be interested in any info on the options, if anyone has any, I would love to see it.

It would help if it was written in very basic terms so my noob, idiot brain can understand it.

Cheers

ministeve2003
10-09-2008, 03:56 AM
I think it goes ....
Low Timing is for High KV motors
High Timing is for Low KV motors

Some of the Bigger Motors Need the High Timing, or they will burn out the esc... or cook the motor....

SK

Toddy86
10-09-2008, 04:04 AM
What does KV stand for?

Twmaster
10-09-2008, 04:09 AM
KV= RPM per volt. So if you have a motor with a KV of 900 and connected it to an 11.1V lipo it would theoretically spin at 9,990 RPM

Timing does not have to do with KV as much as with motor design and number of poles. There was a nice description in the docs for a Hacker ESC. Let me see if I can dig it up and post back here later.

Twmaster
10-09-2008, 04:19 AM
Found it. From a Hacker ESC manual:


2-5 degrees for 2 pole motors (Hacker and other 2 pole)
10 degrees for 4 pole motors (Aveox, Astro) (Maximum RPM on Hacker motors)
18 degrees for 6 pole motors (Phasor, Plettenberg, Mega) (Maximum RPM for Aveox and Astro)
30 degrees for multi-pole motors (most outrunners) (AXi, Kohler some Astro) (Maximum RPM for Phasor, Plettenberg, Mega)

Hope that helps.

Dr Kiwi
10-09-2008, 03:01 PM
Mike - that advice may work well for Hacker ESCs, but as far as I can tell every brand is different, and exactly the opposite recommendations may apply - see, for example, Castle Creations Phoenix - quote from Bernie:


As a rule of thumb, the default timing advance give the best trade off between power and efficiency. If your system runs hot lower the timing. I can't think of a instance where you would need or want high timing.

ministeve2003
10-09-2008, 04:33 PM
Here's another qoute I found

WARNING: For some large motors, you must use High timing mode. Failure to do so will result in a burnt esc.

http://www.hobbycity.com/hobbycity/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=6550&Product_Name=TURNIGY_Sentilon100A_HV_2-12S_(USA_Warehouse)

SK

ministeve2003
10-09-2008, 04:36 PM
I have a motor that gives issues on low startup If I don't have it on High timing...

SK

groundrushesup
10-09-2008, 04:46 PM
I have a motor that gives issues on low startup If I don't have it on High timing...

SK


Yeah, a couple of my CommonSense motors will do the ol' Tweak-n-chirp if the ESC is not on HT, but will run fine if you give it a little turn.

ministeve2003
10-09-2008, 08:42 PM
Yeah, a couple of my CommonSense motors will do the ol' Tweak-n-chirp if the ESC is not on HT, but will run fine if you give it a little turn.

thanks, I couldn't figure out how to describe it...now I know... Tweak-n-chirp....LOL

SK

Nakarti
04-22-2009, 01:49 AM
Yeah, a couple of my CommonSense motors will do the ol' Tweak-n-chirp if the ESC is not on HT, but will run fine if you give it a little turn.

I think the ESC in use affects that as well: I had one that would hesitate(what I call it) on Low timing, but fried on high, and a current one, same motor, that hesitates anyway(cheap esc, high rating) but is worse, and even hotter, with medium to high timing.
FWIW it measures timing in T's that are not elsewhere defined.
...
Found a better answer (searching for "brushless advance-timing" ) from Castle:
((Can't post the link but it's the second result on Google))

1320fastback
04-22-2009, 02:01 AM
I did get the programming card but I have no idea what was what so I just went with the defaults, I too would be interested in any info on the options, if anyone has any, I would love to see it.

It would help if it was written in very basic terms so my noob, idiot brain can understand it.
Cheers

I use the prop brake on my Easystar that has the same ESC, it stops the prop from turning at zero throttle and this dramatically decreases the drag which allows for faster and longer gliding. Also useful for AP as there is no vibration.

Scottrik
06-03-2009, 08:52 AM
KV= RPM per volt. So if you have a motor with a KV of 900 and connected it to an 11.1V lipo it would theoretically spin at 9,990 RPM

I believe kV is actually SUPPOSED to be "thousand rpm/volt", though the common usage has been bastardized due to marketing hype/hysteria where "bigger numbers are better".

The common usage seems to be much as you describe which is actually RPM per volt. The proper kV for your proposed 9900RPM motor on 11.1 volts would be .9 kV. Same value when multiplied out, but the decimal is moved over 3 places to give the thousands of rpm per volt. And yup, 900 definitely seems like it should be better than .9 ...I gotta get me one-a them.

ministeve2003
06-03-2009, 07:33 PM
I looked at that castle link... what a load of :censor:... first off... they're talking about a inrunner motor... and secondly.... it's full of bull....

SK

witeliduche
06-04-2009, 07:55 PM
Hello people. I see you are profs. in constructions. Can someone help me and give info about FLAPS SYSTEMS (how they work) ????? I mean princips, better ways of constracting flaps.

aramid
06-04-2009, 08:51 PM
I've got the same ESC, and while I haven't actually put a flight on it yet, I've been pretty impressed. The tuning card is excellent, although some of the options are indeed poorly explained. There's no way at all to tell what timing you should use for a given motor, so, like you, I have left the timing at its default medium. In ground testing this seems to be a fair choice for my Turnigy 35-30 1400kv.

I believe kV is actually SUPPOSED to be "thousand rpm/volt", though the common usage has been bastardized due to marketing hype/hysteria where "bigger numbers are better".Are you sure? I don't mean to be snarky, because I don't know for certain myself, and am genuinely curious. I've heard this claim a few times before, but this interpretation seems very much in the minority. I wonder if the 'K' in 'Kv' is what throws people off, assuming it's meant to represent 'thousand' as it does in many situations. Remeber that 'K' is also often used for a mathematical constant, which I assume it's doing in this situation as well.

I looked at that castle link... what a load of :censor:... first off... they're talking about a inrunner motor... and secondly.... it's full of bull....I'm not sure it's full of bull, really. The only controversial subject on the page is the claim that brushless motors make theoretically unlimited torque, and my experience with RC cars leads me to agree with the comment. Running a brushed motor, you can change your gearing to give better top speed or better torque, but not both. With a brushless, you seem to get exactly the same torque, wheelies, and acceleration no matter how you gear; the only things that change are your top speed and your motor temperatures.

Hello people. I see you are profs. in constructions. Can someone help me and give info about FLAPS SYSTEMS (how they work) ????? I mean princips, better ways of constracting flaps.Most likely, but not in this thread. If you have a question, find the appropriate sub-forum (either Aerodynamics or Scratch and Kit Built Aircraft) and make a new discussion thread specifically for your question.

ron_van_sommeren
06-05-2009, 02:36 AM
I believe kV is actually SUPPOSED to be "thousand rpm/volt" ...The prefix for 'kilo' is 'k', not 'K'. 'Kv' is a physical quantity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_quantity), the generator constant, expressed in the unit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_unit) rpm/volt, the 'K' stands for the German 'Konstant'. So, a motor has a Kv of e.g. 1500rpm/volt, or Kv=1500rpm/volt. Motor 'has 1500Kv' is wrong even though manuacturers/people do it that way. It's the same as saying 'my neighbour lives 200length from our place'.
Note that in the non-RC world Kv is expressed in volt/rpm, which makes the term 'generator constanct' easier to understand/see: voltage produced for given rpm. (All electric motors are and work as generators, also when 'motoring').

About motor constants
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185271

Vriendelijke groeten ;) Ron

ron_van_sommeren
06-05-2009, 02:47 AM
... I recently bought a Turnigy 40A Plush ESC for my T28 Trojan. The stock ESC was 25A but it burnt out and I thought I would get a bigger capacity to stop that happening again...About de-rating controllers, starting at 'for everyone else':
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?p=11476940#post11476940


... Also, can I damage anything with a 'trial and error' or will the motor just go the wrong way if I get it wrong? (I am presuming the middle wire on the motor goes with the middle wire on the ESC (B) so after that its 50-50. ...And NEVER EVER reverse battery wires to reverse motor rotation. Will cost you a controller. This goes for all types of eletronics: tv, chargers, car radio ...

All tree ESC/motor wires are equivalent, but not the same. They carry the same waveform, albeit spaced in time (120degrees).
More waveform pictures, English explanation
http://www.aerodesign.de/peter/
-> Why does the Torquemax rotate so slowly and so forcefully
and/or
-> SPEEDY-BL self made brushless controller

http://www.aerodesign.de/peter/2001/LRK350/Speedy-BL/Motor-3-phasen.gif

crobar
07-11-2010, 06:31 AM
I am buying a Turnigy 35-42C and possibly a Plush 40A esc. I have read a lot of discussion regarding the programming of esc's and would like to know if I will need to program this esc or can I just plug it in and it will work?

crobar
07-11-2010, 06:50 AM
What is the difference Between the Plush and the Sentry.
Will they both work in the same application?

ministeve2003
07-11-2010, 07:00 AM
What is the difference Between the Plush and the Sentry.
Will they both work in the same application?

I have used both without issues... Buy the programming card it isn't totally needed due to the fact that you can program them with throttle settings, but it's a whole lot easyier...

SK

crobar
07-11-2010, 07:31 AM
I have used both without issues... Buy the programming card it isn't totally needed due to the fact that you can program them with throttle settings, but it's a whole lot easyier...

SK
Since my transmitter is only a Spectrum DX5 without programming capability, it sounds like I will have to use the throttle technique.

quore
07-11-2010, 05:44 PM
Since my transmitter is only a Spectrum DX5 without programming capability, it sounds like I will have to use the throttle technique.


I dont believe it matters if your transmitter is programmable or not. The ESC looks at the position of the throttle on the controller when you are programming it. You listen to tones coming from the ESC and then move the throttle accordingly per the instructions for that ESC. So you are not actually programming anything into the transmitter, just using it to program the ESC.

I am still new to electrics, but that is my understanding. I used a programming card and it was very easy. Definitely worth the money.

Numbthumbs
07-11-2010, 06:35 PM
@crobar- By all means pick up the five dollar programming card for Turnigy ESC's. This thing is golden!!!! You can program a new ESC in about five seconds with that.

http://www.hobbycity.com/hobbycity/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=2169

The plush does not offer battery control, whereas the Sentry has a balancer plug on it (like your charger does for charging) which you plug the battery into. The Sentry monitors your battery for more protection.

Both come with switching BEC's and both are excellent. I personally don't find the Sentrys any better except for maybe peace of mind.

You can use them both for your application. They should automatically recognize the number of cells in your battery, and you shouldn't need to reprogram it, unless your motor screeches and twirps/cheeps/stutters at startup, then you will have to change the timing. As I have the card I cannot tell you how to do this manually :)

With that motor, you should consider the 60A ESC, the motor has a 45A maximum, and the 60A ESC should cover you there, the 40A ESC may limit your prop size choices in the long run.

crobar
07-11-2010, 07:23 PM
Thank you much for clearing this up for me even though you both have probably shared this info many times before. It gets a little confusing going from group to group reading about power systems. I now understand what needs to be done with the esc and I will likely go for the 60A just to be sure. The programming card sounds like a wise investment as well.