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View Full Version : Brushless Motor in a Sky Fly?


cfp_flyer
12-04-2008, 03:57 AM
Wow, I'm a real virgin to this forum thing. I love the site and hope that somebody acutally sees this message.

I've been flying the Hobbico Sky Fly for several months now and I LOVE IT!!! I have already changed the control wires and doubled the size of my elevator and rudder, so it controls great! I've been able to get the loops, etc., but it's not quite strong enought to haul my camera for video without a great deal of struggle (even with the 7pack battery) I am now looking to put a brushless motor in this little baby. Did I mention that I am also a virgin to electronics/electric motors too.


I've been told that I can put a Brushless in the plane, but I don't know:
what size/type of motor
do I use the same prop or how do I find the right prop
what about the exisiting batteries will they work
any other electronics needed?
thanks to anyone who can help. Love the site.

Angler-Hi
12-04-2008, 04:09 AM
Hey friend. I actually started out on the Sky Fly myself. Yes you can put a brushless motor in her. Keep in mind, that you will need a brushless ESC. The servos in her are 5-wire servos or part of the Rx board, I can't remember. If they are 5-wire servos, they can't be used with anything else. You may want to go with the standard and get 3-wired servos. You can pick them up cheap. I don't know if you plan on trying to fly her with the stock radio or do you have your own? I ask because if you plan on changing everything out, you will need to do the same with the Rx as the stock one will not accept 3-wire servos. I would also power her with a li-po battery and get rid of that heavy Ni-mh pack. Li-pos offer more power and alot less weight.

As for the specific motor to put in her, that will be up to you as there are so many options out there. It's been a long time since I've owned my SkyFly, but I would say most 400 class motors would be just fine for what you're wanting. The prop will be determined by the motor you go with. Most motors should tell you what prop ranges should be used. I hope this helps some. Welcome to Wattflyer and good luck. Hopefully someone else will chime in soon.

cfp_flyer
12-06-2008, 12:39 AM
Thanks for the advice. I am guessing ESC stands for electronic speed control. And just to confirm I currently have 5 wire servos and need to get 3 wire?
Well, I am off to the hobby store tomorrow with much anticipation.

Thanks again, i'll let you know how it goes.

Angler-Hi
12-06-2008, 01:34 AM
Thanks for the advice. I am guessing ESC stands for electronic speed control. And just to confirm I currently have 5 wire servos and need to get 3 wire?
Well, I am off to the hobby store tomorrow with much anticipation.

Thanks again, i'll let you know how it goes.

No problem friend. Yes, the ESC is an electric speed controller and yes, you will need 3-wire servos especially if you're going to be flying with your own radio and not the stock one. I don't know if you can use the stock one for your upgrade though, as it would need a Rx that your 3-wire servos can plug into, as well as the ESC.

Mike

cfp_flyer
12-06-2008, 01:33 PM
Here I go again. What's an Rx? Is this like the board that's already in the Sky Fly, but one that's compatable for the new components?

Angler-Hi
12-06-2008, 03:47 PM
Here I go again. What's an Rx? Is this like the board that's already in the Sky Fly, but one that's compatable for the new components?

LOL....the "Rx" is short for receiver. It's what all your servos and ESC will plug into. You can't fly with an upgraded sysytem with that stock radio friend. You can find 4-6ch radios for less than you think friend. It's also a very good investment...one of the biggest you'll make in this hobby.

Mike

jdetray
12-08-2008, 11:46 PM
cfp -

Below is a hookup diagram for a typical electric plane using standard, off-the-shelf parts. If you change to a brushless motor and standard 3-wire servos, you'll need to replace everything, including your transmitter.

Basically, you'll be removing all of the electronics from the plane and replacing with all new components. You'll need the following new items:

brushless motor
prop
speed controller (ESC)
2 servos
receiver
transmitter

- Jeff

cfp_flyer
12-09-2008, 01:31 AM
Thank you very much this quite helpful. Can you give me an ideas of what it should cost to do all of this using cheap parts? I went to my local hobby store and it looked that they would charge me $150 for all of the components, however they looked to be high end, high quality components. This airplane is a cheapy and I just want to keep it running so my boys can improve their flying skills. Allbeit with MORE POWER!!!

Thanks again.

jdetray
12-09-2008, 02:59 AM
Even though the Sky Fly itself is a "cheapy," I don't necessarily recommend buying the cheapest available radio gear, unless you think it unlikely that you'll eventually own more advanced planes.

While the RTF (Ready to Fly) planes such as the Sky Fly come with a complete set of radio gear, many planes come with no radio gear at all. In fact, that's the norm.

That's why it's worthwhile to buy good quality radio equipment if you plan stick with this fun hobby. You'll be able to use a new transmitter with many future planes. Any servos, receivers, and ESCs you buy now can later be transferred to other planes when you retire the Sky Fly.

Using myself as an example, I have four planes but only one transmitter. For each plane, I have installed a receiver, servos, ESC, and motor. My one transmitter works with any of the four planes. I also share batteries between planes.

Now, if you don't foresee yourself wanting other planes in the future, maybe it makes sense to buy the cheapest available gear to upgrade the Sky Fly. But if it is your intention to move on to more advanced planes that do not come with their own radio gear, it makes sense to purchase good radio gear that will last through many future planes.

For radio gear, the big names are Futaba and Hitec, and there are several less popular manufacturers who are just fine as well. They all offer a wide range of transmitters, receivers, and servos at all kinds of price points. I don't know much about the Sky Fly, so I won't make specific recommendations.

- Jeff

Angler-Hi
12-09-2008, 01:41 PM
Most of it will be the cost of your radio. You can buy servos for as low as $8.00 and your radio should come with the Rx. So even if you went weith a cheap $60.00 radio, you would spend between $16.00-$25.00 for the two servos, about $2.00-$3.00 for the prop, $20-$50 for your ESC, depending what amp and brand you go with, and you could get yourself a decent motor for around $12.00-$20.00. For the motor you would go with for your upgrade, I would recommend a motor capable of handling a 3s battery. Chances are your motor will be rated for 2s-3s. Your battery will cost around $20.00-$30.00 if that! I hope this helps.

Mike

powerlines
12-09-2008, 01:45 PM
Did you get it with brushless..??
you should post pictures..

LATER

cfp_flyer
12-10-2008, 03:13 AM
Thanks for the help. I am really torn now. For the cost I am thinking maybe I should just spend a few extra bucks and go ahead and get a better plane with ailerons, a brushless motor and "stuff". Afterall the Sky Fly did it's job in teaching me to fly. Now I am certified "hooked on flying".

Thanks again to all. I am always open to suggestions on next step planes.

Angler-Hi
12-10-2008, 03:20 AM
You could try the ParkZone T-28. It has ailerons and many swear by it as a good aileron trainer. I would recommend the HobbyZone Super Cub, but if you have already mastered the SkyFly then you will more than likely become bored with it. Good luck to you friend.

Mike