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bash11
12-12-2008, 05:04 PM
Does anyone know of a seaplane kit would be good for a starter? I am looking for one that uses about a 100 to 175 watt motor and sells for around $40 to $60. I am already experienced in land based parkflyers and 3D, but have never tried the water. Are there any foamy planes for a seaplane of this size?

Larry3215
12-13-2008, 05:41 AM
I dont know of any kit/arf models in that price range except maybe a GWS SlowStick and add floats.

Oh wait - how about a Polaris foamy?

Its a Steve Schumate design, so you know its a good one.

Plans and build thread here if you want to scratch build one:

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=922465&pp=100

purchace kits here

http://modelaero.com/Merchant5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=M&Product_Code=POL-1&Category_Code=AM

Its on the hi end of your price range but I doubt you will find anything cheeper thats worth a darn.

You could also scratch one of my Capricorns and be on th elow end of your price range :)

http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26120

bash11
12-15-2008, 06:11 PM
Thanks for the excellent advice. I am thinking about building both the Polaris and Capricorn. This should keep me busy until the lake thaws.:)

Larry3215
12-15-2008, 10:44 PM
Either one will fly off snow or grass and the Capricorn is all terrain so no need to wait :)

Im going to build an XXL Polaris soon I think. Roughly 7 feet long aprx 60" wing span out of 1/2" blue foam. Need to decide on a power plant and servos first....

jimsp
12-16-2008, 03:16 AM
For a more conventional looking seaplane you could give my Sea Wasp a try. It uses the wing and tail feathers from Hobby Peoples $27 Wasp(occasionally on sale for less) and a few dollars of EPS foam. The building thread with plans is here. (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=721393)It comes in at about 25 oz so the 100 to 175 watt range is a good fit.

Of all my seaplanes I fly this one the most. Itís a very reliable performer and Iíve yet to tip it over on the water. Iíve taken off in conditions where bigger glow powered planes have floundered. Itís also the one I like to use on the snow. In fact, regardless of which plane to choose, making the initials flights off snow is a good ideal. You get a good feel for how the plane flies before committing it to the water.

Dereck
12-18-2008, 02:44 AM
Pretty boring in some respects - mostly because it's such a good, rock solid flier. The 'Pondside' from Hobby Hangar - $50 + shipping:

http://www.hobbyhangar.com/test/kits.htm

Slight bias - I've had three! First one was built in England, early 1990's when it was the Ace RC Puddlemaster. Sold that one, hauled the Graupner 7.2V S600 motor over to the US and bought another, that flew on the same motor! That was lost to a dodgy connector. Last one was the identical but laser cut Pondside - and much easier to build - not that the PM was all that hard. That one had an Astro 035 Cobalt brushed on DD.

The first two would ROW fine on six nicads, to very sprightly indeed on 8. That's a nomimal 7.4V to 9.6V at a throbbing 20A into a 7 x 6 prop. #3 with the Astro flew on six cells - 7.4V at around 32A into a 7.5 and about shot off the water! So colossally expensive motors ain't needed.

Regretably, while shooting touch and goes in front of a buddy's family lakeside pad, #3 did a touch atop the neighbourhood turtle and lost her bottom - not good when the fuselage is a hull. The turtle was not interviewed about the accident ;) A club buddy acquired the remains of the model, dried it out, repaired it and still flies it/

All mine were REM control, understand the present kit has an aileron option. Which could extend the wind you could fly in - it's quoted 38 - 48 oz is a little over what all three of mine weighed in at.

Flying - it's a delight. The rudder is very cleverly designed to give you steering at slow speeds, but as you accelerate to TO, the water part lifts out of the water and it assumes air steering as you speed up. It's general handling is superbly well balanced and it does great 'splash and goes', which has to be the point of flying off water really.

I recall flying my first one back in England off a grass full scale airfield and the grass was pretty wet early in the morning - England's good at being wet, of course - and I was shooting touch and goes off grass with no problem. Flew her onto the grass - you don't three point at the stall like you do with a taildragger landplane, of course - opened up the power to keep her moving just under flying speed, go to full power, pull back to break the stiction of the grass and climb away.

One great model, am contemplating a fourth to keep handy just in case I ever get decent water access again. I build all three to test flying in under two weeks.

Hope that helps

Dereck

themantoknow
03-07-2009, 02:52 AM
I have a HZ supercub on GWS floats and it flies great. Check out my member photos

nascarwings
03-09-2009, 05:55 PM
http://www.2dogrc.com/ecommerce/os/catalog/model-aero-polaris-electric-plane-p-2503.html This one is fun...lol

beavenx5
03-13-2009, 05:44 PM
I have a HZ supercub on GWS floats and it flies great. Check out my member photos

The Supercub is how I started flying with floats. Great plane but a little over your budget.
Another nice option is the GWS beaver ARF($34). The GWS floats ($10) were designed for it. You will need an ESC and radio to complete. This plane would look soo cool and seems to fit the budget.

I now have a very nice E-Flite Taylorcraft with 24"foam floats from seaplanesupply.com. I love it. Something for you to think about as a second seaplane.

stevecooper
03-13-2009, 05:57 PM
E-Starters fly great on floats!:D!I built another one from a 5$ foam glider and a 9$ GWS float, bub, steve:ws:

Jim Casey
03-14-2009, 12:11 PM
I always answer your question the same way: Take your favorite sportplane and add a set of floats. GWS, PlaneFun Floats, and Seaplane supply all make small floats for electrics. Links to PlaneFun and Seaplane supply in my website: www.smilesandwags.com/floats.html

Larry3215
03-14-2009, 12:45 PM
Nice float page Jim!

tyrick69
04-02-2009, 02:10 PM
The Supercub is how I started flying with floats. Great plane but a little over your budget.
Another nice option is the GWS beaver ARF($34). The GWS floats ($10) were designed for it. You will need an ESC and radio to complete. This plane would look soo cool and seems to fit the budget.

I now have a very nice E-Flite Taylorcraft with 24"foam floats from seaplanesupply.com. I love it. Something for you to think about as a second seaplane.
Beavenx5,
How's the stability of the Taylorcraft while taxiing on the water? I also started with the Supercub on floats as my first seaplane but as you probably know, it is very hard to taxi in any kind of wind. The SC will easily flip over if you get any gusts from the side or rear while taxiing. I have been interested in the Taylorcraft for some time and would like to put floats on it as well and was just wondering if it is more stable than the SC on the water? Thanks in advance.
Rick

Fly Time
04-27-2009, 06:23 PM
Beavenx5,
How's the stability of the Taylorcraft while taxiing on the water? I also started with the Supercub on floats as my first seaplane but as you probably know, it is very hard to taxi in any kind of wind. The SC will easily flip over if you get any gusts from the side or rear while taxiing. I have been interested in the Taylorcraft for some time and would like to put floats on it as well and was just wondering if it is more stable than the SC on the water? Thanks in advance.
Rick
Any plane with dihedral in the wings is going to flip easily in a cross wind unless it has wing tip floats (like the Great Planes Seawind). I'll bet a Super Cub with ailerons and no dihedral would do well on floats. I've got one that I recently converted to ailerons (made the wing flat so it would roll) and I've been having a lot of fun with it (mine has flaps too). I'm tempted to pick up some GWS floats to see how they do.