PDA

View Full Version : First build, set-up advice please


alienx
02-24-2006, 12:51 AM
I received the Watt-age C182 and all the other parts I ordered and am ready to build it now. Looks pretty straight forward as far as the build goes. My concerns are that I may not have the right parts.

First, the model instructions warn against a feather receiver, and suggest a dual-conversion Micro 555 or Electron 6. I bought the newer Micro 05S (specs below). I am paranoid that the range will be too short on this receiver. I can't believe that the true range is 1 Mile+ as indicated below. Should I be concerned with my choice?


Type5 Channel Single Conversion FM Range1 Mile +Operating Voltage3.6 - 6.0 volts DC Current Drain 9 mAh +/- 10% http://www.hitecrcd.com/WTB/clearpixel.gifEnglishMetric


Size L x W x H1.46"x0.74"x0.40"
37x19.3x10mm



Weight.30 ounce
8.6 grams





The other thing is the motor and ESC. The motor is a E-Flite Park 450 BL Outrunner MTR 890KV and the ESC is a Great Planes Silver Series 35A Brushless ESC 5V/2A BEC. When I read the tech specs on these pieces, they seem to be appropriate for the model I am putting them in, but I know nothing about matching these things.

The Cessna is supposed to have a 400 size brushless motor (if you don't want to use the Cobalt 400). Do I have too much motor?

Last question. Do I need to buy any special connectors to put this together (like Dean's)? Any Do's and Don'ts of setting up the electronics would be a big help.

The guy at the shop I bought this from seemed to know a lot about this, but I just wanted to make sure that I got an independent opinion and didn't just end up with the closest thing to the right parts that they had in the shop.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!! This is all contributing to my education!!

Thanks. Andy

PS. This is ultimately supposed to be powered by a 3 cell Lipo battery but I don't have it yet because we were waiting to see how large that battery area was first.
https://www.redrockethobbies.com/templates/1/images/clear1x1.gif

MountainFlyer
02-24-2006, 02:34 AM
I use a Hitec Micro 05S in one of my planes .. its a very good RX .. the range is as advertized. don't let the single conversion and small package scare you ... its a WAY!! better RX than the old Feather RX And its every bit as good as the old 555 dual conversion RX and what makes it even nicer is that channel 5 is actually channel 6 ( makes it extremely nice for setting up dual aileron servos and flaperons ( since you normally use channel 1 and 6 for dual ailerons with a Hitec TX like the Optic 6 ) so its actually a great "lite" RX for a park flyer

heh you can never have too much motor :) well unless its so large the weight breaks the landing gear :D
the E-flite450 should be fine actually, since they recommended a 400 brushless. any idea what the AUW is? ( AUW being "all up weight" eg what the plane weighs with everything needed to fly in it )
the E-Flite 450 should come with connectors installed on the motor ends and should have the female ends included for soldering onto the wires coming from the ESC, if i remember correctly the Great Planes Silver Series 35A ESC comes with Deans ultra's on the battery lead so thats covered but you will still most likely need connectors for the battery
also with a brushless if the motor spins the wrong way .. swap two wires between the motor and ESC ( any two ) and it will turn the other way ;)

i can't think of anything else atm.. make sure to check the CoG with everything installed before flying it should tell you where it should be at in the manual <--- very important do btw :)

sounds like that guy at the shop did a good job
M

Sky Sharkster
02-24-2006, 02:37 AM
Hi Andy, Welcome to Wattflyer! I'll try to give you my opinions on your questions, I'm sure there'll be others!
The HiTec receivers (except the "Feather") are some of the best ones made. The "Old" 555 earned the reputation of being "Bulletproof", meaning nothing bothered it. The "Electron" in my opinion, is just as good. I haven't tried the new 055 but if it's anywhere near as good you will have no range problems. Most planes with the exception of gliders and E-powered gliders rarely get more than 500 feet away anyway. If your plane was sitting on top of a football goalpost and you were standing at the other goal-line, could you see it well enough to fly it? That's 300 feet!
The motor you've selected is about right for the plane. It may be a bit overpowered but not much. Better over than under! The ESC is more than enough, you'll be able to use it on a larger motor later if you want to. 20-25 Amps would likely be enough for your motor but having a bigger one won't hurt anything, in fact it's a good safety margin. To connect the motor to the ESC I'd suggest the gold "bullet" connectors (small male/female pins, soldered to the wires of each component) size about 2.5mm. Hobby-Lobby.com has'em as well as good hobby shops. For the battery-to-ESC and charger-to battery the standard is Deans Ultras. At first you'll be OK with "Sets" (1 male, one female) but as you aquire more batteries you'll need more females, Deans sell packs of these also. The Deans come with black heat-shrink tube to cover the joints (don't forget to put the tubing on before you solder!) but I like to pick up some red + white (Radio Shack) so the tubing matches the wires. There's a thread near yours (here) with a photo of the wiring set-up that should help.
Well, there'll be other answers but that's my .02$! Good Luck!
Ron

alienx
02-24-2006, 02:48 AM
Thanks fellas. That is all comforting!! I wish I read this a minute earlier. I just ordered all the "glue" and building supplies I needed from Tower Hobby and forgot to get the connectors. But that can wait I guess.

Incidentally, the receiver is very nice (small/lite) in my noob opinion. It's good to know the seller gave me decent advice. He sounded like he knew what he was doing.

Hey, one more question. My flight pack came with a micro switch. I think I saw someplace that it went near the ESC. I was wondering what it was for exactly. I would think that removing the battery would have been all the switch you needed, but I must be mistaken.

Thanks again for the info!!!

Sky Sharkster
02-24-2006, 03:07 AM
Hi Andy, MM is right, if the motor came with connectors, (bullets) go ahead and use'em. Once you get started with a certain brand of connectors (for batteries) stick with that kind. It's a big hassle to have different ones for different planes, batteries, etc. Another problem is you will need to match the charger connections also. I use Deans Ultras for 400 size and larger, Deans Minis for small stuff.
Regarding the micro switch, you're right, the best and safest way to handle an electric power system if it's not "Ready to fly" is disconnecting the battery. The switch is not the most reliable way to make sure the plane is "safe". I don't use them, so it forces me to remember to disconnect the battery. Also one brand of ESC that I know of (there may be others) allows the battery to "trickle" drain with the switch off. The motor won't start but the battery is sort of on "Standby" and it will kill a Lipo if left connected. "Pull the Plug!!" is my rule.
Good Luck, you're in for a LOT of fun!!
Ron

MountainFlyer
02-24-2006, 03:49 AM
i use one of those switches with a small 4.8v 270mAh NiCAD battery to power up the RX's in planes im working on ( for setting servo centering etc ) makes it easy to turn the power off and on, other than thats thats all i ever use them for.. :)

alienx
02-24-2006, 04:38 PM
i use one of those switches with a small 4.8v 270mAh NiCAD battery to power up the RX's in planes im working on ( for setting servo centering etc ) makes it easy to turn the power off and on, other than thats thats all i ever use them for.. :)

That's a good idea.

I got lucky today and stumbled across a pretty well stocked shop on my way to work. Now I can get all the little items that I don't want to wait a week for in the mail. Things are working out nicely. Looking forward to starting my first build tonight or tomorrow!!

cyclops2
02-24-2006, 04:51 PM
A piece of good advice when you are almost complete. Put up a post that you would like a Instructor of a club near you to check the plane out.

He should find ANYTHING that may not give you the best success on the first flight.

Good luck.

Jeremy Z
02-24-2006, 11:44 PM
Your Cessna will fly WELL on a 400 BRUSHED motor. A 400 sized brushless motor is already a big improvement in power. The Park 450 motor is too much motor for that plane. The Park 400 is more appropriate. It is going to be an absolute rocket if you prop it right. The only real disadvantage to overpowering it is that you will not be able to fly as slowly. You've got a heavier motor, with a heavier speed control, and will probably need heavier batteries to make sure you don't overload them. This adds up to higher wing loading, which means the plane will not fly as slowly as it would with a lighter setup. Not to mention that it will be carrying more inertia in case of a crash.

After all that though, I think you'll be fine. ;) It just won't be as floaty as a typical Cessna.

I've got a Micro 05S; it is a great receiver. I don't think I trust it at extreme distances like I would my Electron 6, but I haven't tried either of them beyond about a quarter of a mile or so. That receiver is plenty good enough.

You'll need bullet connectors for the motor/ESC connection; those usually come with the ESC.

You'll need good quality battery connectors for the ESC/battery connection. Many of us like Deans Ultra. Others like Andersen PowerPole (or APP for short) but you need a $50 crimper for those. But none of us like the Tamiya connectors for long. They get looser and looser over time an cause glitches, and eventually burn up the connection.

You're going to have fun with that plane. It's pretty rare that someone gets a plane like that and spends the money to set it up for all the performance he will ever need.

I've been trying to get my dad to upgrade his Ultrafly Cessna to brushless, and he's not biting. It flies well on the Falcon 400 geared setup, but it would be better with a brushless setup. (for flying in more wind, if for no other reason!)

alienx
02-25-2006, 12:54 AM
Your Cessna will fly WELL on a 400 BRUSHED motor. A 400 sized brushless motor is already a big improvement in power. The Park 450 motor is too much motor for that plane. The Park 400 is more appropriate. It is going to be an absolute rocket if you prop it right. The only real disadvantage to overpowering it is that you will not be able to fly as slowly. You've got a heavier motor, with a heavier speed control, and will probably need heavier batteries to make sure you don't overload them. This adds up to higher wing loading, which means the plane will not fly as slowly as it would with a lighter setup. Not to mention that it will be carrying more inertia in case of a crash.

After all that though, I think you'll be fine. ;) It just won't be as floaty as a typical Cessna.

I've got a Micro 05S; it is a great receiver. I don't think I trust it at extreme distances like I would my Electron 6, but I haven't tried either of them beyond about a quarter of a mile or so. That receiver is plenty good enough.

You'll need bullet connectors for the motor/ESC connection; those usually come with the ESC.

You'll need good quality battery connectors for the ESC/battery connection. Many of us like Deans Ultra. Others like Andersen PowerPole (or APP for short) but you need a $50 crimper for those. But none of us like the Tamiya connectors for long. They get looser and looser over time an cause glitches, and eventually burn up the connection.

You're going to have fun with that plane. It's pretty rare that someone gets a plane like that and spends the money to set it up for all the performance he will ever need.

I've been trying to get my dad to upgrade his Ultrafly Cessna to brushless, and he's not biting. It flies well on the Falcon 400 geared setup, but it would be better with a brushless setup. (for flying in more wind, if for no other reason!)

I guess in the back of my mind, I want to swap the motor down. I guess could use a 400 size (smaller if it would be enough, but I don't think so) and keep the 450 for another time. I guess the ESC and the other components would work with a simple motor swap, so at least it would be less expensive. I really do want a scale flyer. I'm very far from being ready to fly at performance speeds anyway.

Incidentally, the ESC does come nicely equipped with Dean's on one end, and gold female bullets on the other. So at least I don't have to cut them and pay for new connectors.

Well, I have all my tools and work area and expoxy and CA and knife and pins and all, ready to go. Tomorrow morning will be day 1. One thing that has me a little worried still is that I read a thread on the web someplace and a lot of people seemed to hate the bell-crank aileron setup. It may have even caused a few crashes. I guess I will build it stock (not smart enough yet to do it any other way), but if anyone has any insight into this, I am in no hurry to fly it. I would entertain alternatives. I do really like the clean look of the linkages though. I guess the only two other options I've seen were to put two servos under the wing, or there was some type of cable that one guy used. Again, I'm new so this is only something I read. No real knowledge of what they had to do to change the stock set-up.

Either way, I skydived for a lot of years out of a 182. I am really excited to have one of my own!! I hope I can do it justice in the build and the air. Time will tell.

Thanks for the advice. Keep it coming!!