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Sagiv
08-02-2009, 03:14 AM
Here's the dilemma. I want one, but I have absolutely no interest in assembling a kit from scratch. I want it to be RTF or as close to it as possible. I know the 450 can come 95% assembled. Is this possible with the 600 or am I out of luck unless I pay someone to put it together (hobby shop owner, if he would do that).

Kirsty_Carnage
08-02-2009, 04:58 AM
Looks like your going to have to pay the LHS owner

BoysToys
08-02-2009, 07:20 AM
The only way you are going to get a 600 RTF is if you buy one used or get someone to build it for you. The only large electric heli I know of that comes RTF is the the Century Swift. http://www.centuryheli.com/products/helikits/swiftRTF/index.htm?currentid=220

The swift is not a bad heli, but it is not in the same league as the TRex 600.

My advice is to go over to Helifreak.com, download the Finless videos on building the 600, and build one YOURSELF from a kit. That way you will know how to repair it and fix things as you crash.

Kirsty_Carnage
08-02-2009, 09:59 AM
Boystoys speaks words of great wisdom, I'm with his statement..they really arent that bad to build, just setting up the head can be a bit difficult...finless videos make it understandable to say the least.

Kirsty xx

Sagiv
08-02-2009, 01:59 PM
Iv'e seen about half of the finless videos, and those are the impetus behind me saying I have no desire to do it. I realize that it will make things simpler when I crash, as I'll have a more thorough technical understanding of what's what.

But this is a hobby, and I would get no "enjoyment" out of the build. I just wanna fly.

I'm sure I "could" build it after watching the videos and following the directions. But it seems very tedious, and I didn't get into the hobby for tedium.

I appreciate the help my friends. I will take a look into that Century Swift.

FL Knifemaker
08-08-2009, 02:20 PM
I just built a 500 and found the videos and the build to be fun. I also learned a lot at the same time. It really went together fast too. For me, the only confusing part is all the Tx settings but if I'm going to fly them, I need know them.

I'm looking forward to buiding a 700 next!!

Sagiv
08-08-2009, 05:43 PM
I just built a 500 and found the videos and the build to be fun. I also learned a lot at the same time. It really went together fast too. For me, the only confusing part is all the Tx settings but if I'm going to fly them, I need know them.

I'm looking forward to buiding a 700 next!!


Well maybe you should build me a 600 if you enjoy it so much lol.

pvtzemerak
08-09-2009, 01:55 AM
Ive had the same problem. The kits look VERY intimidating. But if i do buy one, ill probably bring it over to the club to see if they can help me. At my club, we have ALOT of guys who fly helis.
My only advice is to join a club and get some help building, thats probably what im going to do when i start to fly helis.
--PvT

FL Knifemaker
08-09-2009, 01:56 PM
IMHO, if you can do a balsa stick build or a foamy scratch build, building a heli is MUCH easier. I would rate it as the same level of dificulty as installing servos and connecting controls. Everything screws together and if you make a mistake, you can take it back apart. With the Align kit, you build the head assembly first which is probably the most difficult part but the instructions are excellent. All the bags are marked so you never have parts out that aren't going to be used. Once that's done the rest is simple.

My feeling is, sooner or later you're going to have to REbuild it :) Having the knowledge behind building originally will be a big help.

pvtzemerak
08-09-2009, 02:17 PM
IMHO, if you can do a balsa stick build or a foamy scratch build, building a heli is MUCH easier. I would rate it as the same level of dificulty as installing servos and connecting controls. Everything screws together and if you make a mistake, you can take it back apart. With the Align kit, you build the head assembly first which is probably the most difficult part but the instructions are excellent. All the bags are marked so you never have parts out that aren't going to be used. Once that's done the rest is simple.

My feeling is, sooner or later you're going to have to REbuild it :) Having the knowledge behind building originally will be a big help.

You sure are getting me excited for my first T-rex kit :D
Of course, i have to buy a sim too :D
--PvT

FL Knifemaker
08-09-2009, 03:16 PM
You sure are getting me excited for my first T-rex kit :D
Of course, i have to buy a sim too :D
--PvT

A SIM is a must!! After practicing for many hours in RealFlight, I was able to easily hover and land my friends Furion. He has it setup for full blown 3D but it behaved just like the 450's in the SIM. The 500 should be much more stable. I'm not really into the 3D thing, I just want to fly and land without any mishaps and I'll be happy!!

BoysToys
08-10-2009, 02:42 AM
My feeling is, sooner or later you're going to have to REbuild it :)

Ain't that the the TRUTH!!

I just put my 600 electric into the dirt two weeks ago. It was a total loss of everything except for the electronics.:blah: I was practicing my inverted flight when I corrected the wrong way and it went in very hard. :eek: In the end, it was cheaper to buy a new 600ESP kit without a motor and ESC than to purchase all of the needed parts. My new kit arrived at my house on Wedensday night at about 7:00 P.M. I put two hours in on Wednesday night and Thursday night and had the complete airframe built. My other box of parts (servo gears, servo cases, ect) arrived Friday evening. I spent about 6 hours in the garage Friday night and was able to fly my new 600ESP yesterday 4 times.

Hopefully I won't have to do that again for a while.

Here is a pic I just took today after unloading my truck.

http://www.wattflyer.com/photopost/data/500/thumbs/IMG_5542_small.jpg (http://www.wattflyer.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=5656)

FL Knifemaker
08-13-2009, 01:35 PM
Ain't that the the TRUTH!!

I just put my 600 electric into the dirt two weeks ago. It was a total loss of everything except for the electronics.:blah: I was practicing my inverted flight when I corrected the wrong way and it went in very hard. :eek: In the end, it was cheaper to buy a new 600ESP kit without a motor and ESC than to purchase all of the needed parts. My new kit arrived at my house on Wedensday night at about 7:00 P.M. I put two hours in on Wednesday night and Thursday night and had the complete airframe built. My other box of parts (servo gears, servo cases, ect) arrived Friday evening. I spent about 6 hours in the garage Friday night and was able to fly my new 600ESP yesterday 4 times.

Hopefully I won't have to do that again for a while.

Here is a pic I just took today after unloading my truck.

http://www.wattflyer.com/photopost/data/500/thumbs/IMG_5542_small.jpg (http://www.wattflyer.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=5656)

That's a nice line up!! I know I will crash sooner or later. I have a very well equiped shop and can fix or make many of the parts myself. But.......time is money and buying a new kit would quickly make sense over buying individual parts or fixing broken ones.

My 500 is still sitting on my workbench, ready to go. I'm busy with business now so it could be a few weeks before I get time to maiden it. I'm enjoying it on display though :D

MaxAdventure
09-12-2009, 03:18 PM
Not want to build a heli? I don't think someone that is not interested in how the thing is put together will stick with flying it.

Adjusting the blade tracking - if you don't do it, you won't know to watch for it. What if some damage occurred in transport or elsewhere - you won't even know what to look for. How would you resolve a vibration that shows up one day?

Head adjustments - you have the head built mild, low collective pitch, low cyclic and you want to advance, you need to understand the link geometry. What if the builder thinks its right for your flying but it turns out you have great reflexes and the head should be more responsive so the mild cyclic is holding back your progress?

Every adjustment, crash, and preflight will go to the hobby shop?

preflight! what about preflight? How will you know when something looks wrong or right if you didn't build it?

An ARF airplane needs to have the right incidence, balance, throws; but once it's done, it's done! The only adjustment left is a re-kit.

However, a heli is all wearing mechanics. The more you fly it, the more you end up getting into it, especially as parts wear out! And the cheaper the heli, the faster they wear...

I've been flying heli's off an on since around '93, but I've learned more in the last year or two than all previous years combined. Meaning heli's seem to be increasing in scope the more you get into them. (flying, tuning, building)

If you don't want to build your heli, you may want to really evaluate what it is you do want and consider the kind of investment it is. If you still come back and want to have a mechanic - power to you! Heck, I have a buddy that wants me to do all the work on his nitro trucks and I built him a heli. Funny thing, he's usually at home watching TV while I'm out getting stick time.....

just some food for thought.

martin_05
09-16-2009, 07:18 AM
But this is a hobby, and I would get no "enjoyment" out of the build. I just wanna fly.

No problem. Forget about a T-Rex 600 then. Helis of that class are for people who enjoy building, tunning, modifying and maintaining the machinery.

If you just want to fly buy one of the many ready-to-fly heli's out there and have a good time. They are not going to be as good as a T-Rex 600 class machine, but you can't be choosy if you are not interested in building one. You get to choose from a cadre of counter-rotating rotor helis as well as a few single rotor fixed and variable pitch units.

I'd recommend that you budget buying five full helicopters because you WILL crash them and, since you have no interest in building you might as well throw them in the trash after a crash and crack open a new box.

It might actually be very wise for you to get a simulator first. Maybe you'll decide that helis are not for you. Which is where my opinion lies given your posts. I really don't think that helis are for you given that you consider building and working on them tedium. For some of us this is as much fun and as interesting and flying them.

If you can be convinced to not do helis I would then suggest that you go with a ready-to-fly foam airplane. Again, your choices and peformance levels are seriously limited. Most of the good stuff requires assembly from a couple of hours to a couple of weeks.

If that doesn't float your boat...no pun intended...you might want to consider an RC boat or RC car. Lots of ready to run flavors there and less probability of total destruction.


After about three months of continuing to learn to fly with my trex500 I had to tear the head down to clean everything as well as realign the swashplate and replace a servo that developed too mush slop. I also dismatled the tail, replaced the rear rotor blades, lubricated everything, re-dressed the wiring, lowered the main battery tray and checked/tightened every single screw.

This was actually a lot of fun. I bought some new tools and the end result was that the heli now flies even better than before. If this isn't interesting to you I'd recommend you stay away from helis because this is part of life with these models.

-Martin

wrather1
09-16-2009, 04:18 PM
Martin_05 speaks very good advice. I can echo that from personal experience.

I too was greatly intimidated by heli kits at first, so I bought a RTF Belt-CP and ended up crashing it numerous times. After being forced to re-build it each time, I finally learned what's involved in kit-building, the hard way.

A year later now I have a T-Rex 450 and a 500, and love them both, and if (when) they crash I will know how to fix them instead of paying the friendly LHS to do it @ $80/hour.

Cheers,

DW

djetlag
12-24-2009, 07:59 PM
Hello,
Hey Sagiv, looking good.
Don't listen to those dudes man, do what your hearth
tells you to do. Buy one that already flyes and then one
day if you have trouble with it or even if you do crash,
God Forbid. Have no fear I'll take it off your hands, I'll
be glad to buy it from you.
I'm flying / repairing a Honey Bee King2, an EHI 450 is somewhere
in the mail. Would love to repair a 600 or even a 500 for that matter.
If I feed you fish for supper, I feed you for one day.
But if I show you how to fish, you'll be feeding yourself
for as long as you want to eat fish.
Does that seem right...heard that somewhere, can't remember where.
Mind you, don't want to be hurtfull.
Good day, dude
Sly

Music-AMG
12-26-2009, 02:16 PM
Hello,
Hey Sagiv, looking good.
Don't listen to those dudes man, do what your hearth
tells you to do. Buy one that already flyes and then one
day if you have trouble with it or even if you do crash,
God Forbid.

if I feed you fish for supper, I feed you for one day.
But if I show you how to fish, you'll be feeding yourself
for as long as you want to eat fish.
Does that seem right...heard that somewhere, can't remember where.
Mind you, don't want to be hurtfull.
Good day, dude
Sly


The quote is actually, If Feed you a fish, you eat for a day, If I teach you how to fish, the beer will run out.

Just kidding.. I'd get an RTF heli, but, most of of all, I'd get a really good simulator. I went from the beginner e-flite heli's, to the Blade 400 rtf, then finally an Align 600.

Noticed the thread months old, so, hopefully, you have fullfiled your quest.

djetlag
12-27-2009, 03:06 AM
Old,shmold,
Should start noticing the dates.....
and then maybe not.

Music-AMG
12-27-2009, 10:04 AM
Old,shmold,
Should start noticing the dates.....
and then maybe not.


LOL, no problem, how's that global warming working out for ya?????

djetlag
12-28-2009, 09:11 PM
LOL, no problem, how's that global warming working out for ya?????

Last week was cold as hell, couple of days ago it rained, as the days
pass its colder and colder. Near the door I got 2 pair of boots, 1 leather
one rubber, and a pair of skates.
Kinda rollin' with the punches.