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View Full Version : Got my Parkzone FW-190


K CLOSE
04-11-2006, 08:25 PM
Hey, I got the new Parkzone FW-190 the other day. Detail is better than the P-51, and it seems to fly better. I don't have time right now to post further, but I put a short review on RCU if anyone wants to read it. All in all I think they did a great job, and it's an improvment over the Mustang (although that might just be due to the fact that it's not a Mustang). :cool:

K CLOSE
04-25-2006, 05:23 PM
I have a bit more time now, and a few more flights on the Fw. For anyone who's intrested here's my impression of the plane;
For starters, let me start by saying that I like Horizon. My dealings with them have been great. I know some guys bash them as "Toy Grade", and I am also aware of there shortcomings ( P-51 wing failures, launch stalls, radio glitches, ect). BUT-any problem I have ever had with my planes Horizion put it right-(one a range failure with a Cub and the other an unknown glitch with a P-51. Both times Horizon replaced the planes F/O/C).
The FW-190 has a better and more versitile battery hatch/tray, better landing "skid" in the form of a plastic lower 'fuse section, and slows better for landing. It also, in my opinion, has better detail than the P-51.
In flight the FW-190 (without the provided nose weight) does not seem as fast as a P-51, however I have not flown it at the same time a Mustang was airborn. It has also gotten faster with more flights as the motor has broken in. Further, the Mustang seems more nimble somehow. The FW-190 has larger control surfaces and "feels" snappier to me- but in the end I think the Mustang is more the areobat. The revised battery tray will allow a much larger range of battery types and shapes to be used. The hatch however, is held shut by a very small screw into a threaded magnet. This works well, but I already almost lost the screw once.
All in all I think it's a winner. I do not think I will be able to avoid buying a combat module for dogfights with my dad. Horizon, as Parkzone, makes a nice package for a grab-and-go plane. I have other planes that are more expensive/cheaper, faster/slower, stronger/more fragile, ect. - but- you really can throw this plane in your trunk and take it with you for a quick flight on a lunch break or pack it your (large) luggage for down time flights on a trip away from home. :D

hayman1
04-27-2006, 02:29 AM
hello,i'm searching for advise on flight info for my new FW190.my wife and myself are on the road for the spring season in our rv and it's only been a couple of weeks out and i'm getting the itch to fly so off to the LHS I go and I have found the perfect sized and the cutiestlittle warbird anyone could ask for.Now before i give it a heave -hoe into the wild blue experiance has tought me to ask questions first.I have had many years of glow and gas experiance but never anything like this.I see it has came with a prop weight is this a good thing to install for a first unaventful flight?The instructions don't say much in this regards.I would assume that nose heavy is better than tail heavy.also low rates is effective for the first flight or at least till I would feel comfortable?How much throttle is nessacary for a safe and level flight?I know these are all silly questions to ask but purhaps this could make the difference between a great first flight or just the oppisite.please any help would be appreciated.Is this a fast model?hoping it's not a snappy plane at say half throttle.

Sky Sharkster
04-27-2006, 12:47 PM
To Hayman 1, I haven't flown the FW 190 but here's a couple of off-the-cuff suggestions; The 190 had a very short nose (the early, radial engine models) so it likely comes out tail-heavy when modeled. Depending on the weight of your specific battery pack, yours may balance behind the recommended C.G. If it does, use the prop weight to adjust. If this still doesn't bring the C.G. up to the mark, add stick-on weights inside the cowl until it does. Don't try to fly it tail-heavy! Later, after you've trimmed the plane out you may want to start removing weights to increase manuverability.
If you're using the stock (brushed) motor, I'd launch near full power and be ready to cut back after it's airborne. It should fly (cruise) OK at 1/2 to 2/3rds throttle. Loops and verticals will require more throttle. Don't try to fly too slowly, most Warbirds have a wicked low-speed tip stall and you could be in a spin before you know it.
Dual rates are great for aerobatics but I'd stick with the recommended rates (on "low") to trim it out. Very few planes crash because of under-control!
Last suggestion; If you can find a model flying site in your travels, why not have an more experienced flyer trim it out? Maybe somebody has the same brand radio and can "buddy" box you until it's trimmed, then you can take over. Warbirds are not trainers, not docile, forgiving or slow. Why take chances you don't have to?
Just my .02$
Ron

crxmanpat
04-28-2006, 10:29 PM
Hmmm....the airframe only is $100. Since I would be using lipos, and would rather use my own radio and gear I already have, I may just order this from Horizon.

I already have the P-51, and am enjoying it very much. It would be nice to have the Butcher Bird too.

Vintauri
05-05-2006, 04:05 PM
The hatch however, is held shut by a very small screw into a threaded magnet. This works well, but I already almost lost the screw once.


You don't need to unscrew it. It's a magnet hold down so just pull the hatch up and the magnet comes with the hatch. There is another magnet in the fuse that it "attaches" to.

Steve

tenore
05-08-2006, 04:25 PM
One of the guys at our local field bought the whole package (radio and flight pack), and I saw it fly yesterday. It flies very well, I hand launched it with no problems, would almost fly out of my hand, looked good in the air, loops and rolls no problem. The only downside is, he's only flown it twice and the fuselage is beginning to split in the cockpit. I would say there is a 1/4" gap behind the pilot.

alienx
05-09-2006, 01:52 AM
hello,i'm searching for advise on flight info for my new FW190.my wife and myself are on the road for the spring season in our rv and it's only been a couple of weeks out and i'm getting the itch to fly so off to the LHS I go and I have found the perfect sized and the cutiestlittle warbird anyone could ask for.Now before i give it a heave -hoe into the wild blue experiance has tought me to ask questions first.I have had many years of glow and gas experiance but never anything like this.I see it has came with a prop weight is this a good thing to install for a first unaventful flight?The instructions don't say much in this regards.I would assume that nose heavy is better than tail heavy.also low rates is effective for the first flight or at least till I would feel comfortable?How much throttle is nessacary for a safe and level flight?I know these are all silly questions to ask but purhaps this could make the difference between a great first flight or just the oppisite.please any help would be appreciated.Is this a fast model?hoping it's not a snappy plane at say half throttle.

I have the P51, which I have to believe is very similar. I base this on the fact that I own the Cub too, and both planes have extremely similar flight characteristics. Obviously, one is bigger and faster and has ailerons. But PZ seems to build them for noobs. They climb all of the time. Even at half throttle, anytime you turn, the plane wants to climb out of it and stall (that is, if the wings are level). I use just about as much forward stick on this as I do the Cub.

So I think you will be in for an easy flight. And you sound like you have experience. I will also say this. If the plane is more than about 50 feet up, I think you will be surprised to see that you can correct from a very sloppy manuever simply by letting go of the stick. Obviously, you'll want to be a little higher the first time. I've gotten battered by the wind a few times so that the plane became uncontrolable and stalled. I just let it fall over the wing of its choice. it points directly down after that, and then you can fly it out of the dive very simply. It is much easier than fighting it for control when it isn't moving forward.

The only times I get in trouble are when the battery gets low and I am not high enough to set up a landing. The Mustang has terrific glide if you come in under power before you chop the throttle.

Grasshopper
05-09-2006, 02:32 AM
Does the tape covering the seam of the fuselage come off pretty easy on these? My P-51 has the tape and the control panel decal rolled back inside the cockpit. I think it's because it was out in the sun one day at the field and the canopy acts like a greenhouse. Does the FW190 do the same? is there a good way to take the canopy off and fix it?

alienx
05-09-2006, 01:24 PM
Does the tape covering the seam of the fuselage come off pretty easy on these? My P-51 has the tape and the control panel decal rolled back inside the cockpit. I think it's because it was out in the sun one day at the field and the canopy acts like a greenhouse. Does the FW190 do the same? is there a good way to take the canopy off and fix it?

I read someplace that to keep the canopy from coming off you could hot glue the pieces that stick into the fuselage, So reverse that and see if you can clean the ends of whatever is holding it inside the fuse. Sorry is this is painfully obvious.

Grasshopper
05-10-2006, 03:56 AM
I'll take a look at that. I really haven't taken the time to look. I really just figured it was glued on and not have posts that go through.

Thanks for the suggestion.