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View Full Version : FW189 Scratch Build Using Everything Imaginable


Bill G
04-23-2006, 04:38 AM
Saw a FW189 in British Flying Scale a few months ago, and it caught my attention. Not exactly a P-38, but same basic twin boom structure. Its a German WWII observation plane. Like the oddball subjects.
Recently I've been finding more and more materials useful in scratch building. After about 20 kits or so, the word kit becomes synonomous with ARF. Too straightforward. Also been making the most of scratch building, by building the subjects you can't get elsewhere.
Why in Foamies? Nobody ever is in the Scale section, and its not exactly scale anyway, Parkflyer posts are basically ARFs and RTFs, and they don't have the Cardboard forum yet.

I just ordered a GWS replacement wing for a C-47 Skytrain (DC-3). The wing's almost identical. I also ordered the tail feathers for a GWS A-10. A bit of reshaping will be done to the rudders. The boom frames are made from cardboard rocket tubes, slit in half. They are glued back together, with formers inside. The booms will be sheeted and covered with iron-on. The center pilot compartment is made from 2 cut up GWS ME109 canopies, a cut up P51 canopy, a small slice of an A10 canopy, and some clear sheet plastic. At this point, the basic birdcage is finished, but not in the pic. Not exactly perfect scale with all the frames and panes correct, but definitely fits into the TLAR category.
I found 2 replacement ParkZone J3 Cub cowls at the LHS. Just about right, when turned upside down, slit across the (now) top portion, overlapped and glued to change the top profile, and then laminated with CA and 1/32 balsa layers and then reshaped. Still easier than making from glass molds.
The booms will be cut open for the wing to fit through. There set on top in the pic, just to give the basic idea. The nacelle formers on the GWS wing will be cut off.
You really have to do 1 or 2 of these builds to get the confidence to see them through. They look like hell in the early stages, so you just need to keep the vision for it alive, and get the current state of it out of mind. The Meteor below demonstrates that principle. The FW189 is the one with the fruit.

re3626
04-23-2006, 09:18 AM
WOOW!!! I like your style and admire your build very much , where can I find more details on FW 189s ??? keep me posted please if nobody else on this twin boom , I'm currently building P-38s & P-61s so this is right up my alley :) :) :) Ralph

Bill G
04-23-2006, 03:15 PM
WOOW!!! I like your style and admire your build very much , where can I find more details on FW 189s ??? keep me posted please if nobody else on this twin boom , I'm currently building P-38s & P-61s so this is right up my alley :) :) :) Ralph

Thanks Ralph
When I first saw the plane in Flying Scale, I searched the web and found 1 combat kit and 1 rc FW189 (origins unknown).

http://avstop.com/Homebuilt/ModelAircraft/ComabtSeriesAircraft.html

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.aircombat.cz/RC_FIGHTER/FOTOS/fw_189.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.aircombat.cz/RC_FIGHTER/archiv/RC_fighter_main_1_2_01.htm&h=500&w=410&sz=47&tbnid=SpndVi3LIAGZJM:&tbnh=127&tbnw=104&hl=en&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dfw%2B189%2Brc%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den% 26lr%3D%26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2004-14,GGLD:en%26sa%3DX&frame=small

A lot of info on the plane, but not much done in rc scale versions. Makes it more unique.

Bill G
04-24-2006, 10:45 PM
Still have to mask window frames off and paint, otherwise the bircage canopy is pretty much complete. I printed and scaled an instrument panel from a FW189 website, and furnished the cocpit area with a seat and side consoles. Can't complain about how it turned out, since there was a point early on, when it almost made it in the trash.
The balsa sheeting is now wrapped around the booms after dampening. The sheeting will be pulled of and reapplied with 3M77 spray contact glue, then CA on the seams. Next, the booms will be cut to fit over the wings, and the nacelles on the GWS wings will be cut off. Doesn't quite look right with the wing set on top of the boom, in the pics.

Bill G
04-28-2006, 05:35 AM
Looks a bit better now, with the booms cut and the wing in place. Cutting the booms for the wing is actually a lot tougher than it looks, if you don't want to mangle the hell out of them, and get a tight tolerance fit, with the booms on straingt and true.
Need to take about 2 inches off the GWS A10 elevator, and rework the shape of the rudders a bit. Found a nice Ultimate Soldier Company pilot. Took off the legs, so he fits, and is a bit lighter. Actually he's an Ardennes foot soldier, but he makes for a good looking pilot.
Might get carried away with some micro retracts that have been laying around a while, now that I finally have a 6ch radio. Should track well with 4 wheels too.

Bill G
05-01-2006, 05:24 AM
Just finished the retract plates, to be mounted in the booms. The mechanism uses overload springs, which enable the stop at each direction to be set separately, and provide some cushioning. Took a while to get it adjusted properly.

Most likely, on the rear of these plates will be 1 more servo on each, one for the rud, and one for the elev. The servos will have to be mounted off to the side of the landing gear wire, with the linkage snuck off to the side also. A bit tight, but not nearly as tight as some I've done. Sure, there's more room in the booms, but I don't want to hack them up, killing scale appearance. Not sure what possesed me to do retracts, but with this 6ch Specktrum, its now possible. (Porbably the Specktrum)

Bill G
05-04-2006, 05:16 AM
Modified the shape and size of the foam GWS A10 tail section, to look a bit more like that of an FW189. The elevator has .040" CF rod, ran along the LE, and a flat CF spar ran along the bottom of the hingeline. It won't interfere with the hinges, since its below the hingeline. A small rect section of light ply is glued to the bottom center of the elevator, from the leading edge to trailing edge CF reinforcers. This makes a strong plate for mounting the steerable tailwheel. Since it sits under the center of the elevator, it will be steered by a linkage arm between the 2 rudders.

The rudders have a small slit near the hingeline, where a cf spar is glued in. This spar is CA glued to the spar that runs along the elevator hingeline, when the mating elevator and rudders are glued together. Even though there is only a small contact point between the CF reinforcers of the elevator and the rudders, it provides much added strength to the rudders. CF sections glue together with CA glue with incredible strength. The rudder CF reinforcers also glue along the rear of the booms, for added strength. A small dia .040 CF rod is glued along the leading edge of the rudders also. These rods insert into small holes drilled into the booms, locating and strengthening the rudder attachment.

Bill G
05-12-2006, 08:38 PM
The idea of making this a slow flyer with light Feigo 12mmLPS motors went out the window, with the anticipated front weight needed for proper cg placement. Pretty impressed with the power the Eflite 370 outrunners put out using a GWS 8040 DD prop, and they're black and not orange, to boot.

The wiring in these twins with retracts is a bit of a job, but the 2 reinforcer grooves in the wing make perfect paths for them. In the photo these grooves have been covered and pasted with filler, to be sanded. CF spars were first glued into the grooves, attaching the wing panels, before the wiring was laid into the grooves.

The retract mech can bee seen in the booms. Just behind the cutout is the elev and rudder servos. They can be removed if needed, through small holes in the inside of the booms, under the wing. E-Z links are on the control horns for pushrod adjustment, since it would be tough to do through access holes, in the booms. Everything's tight.

The aileron setup is basically GWS style, with tubing sleeves glued into the ailerons, so that the torque wires don't mush through the foam. With all the foam parts covered with iron on, they will be strong also.

_____________
It seems that I have no signature ablility now. Well, there's still the old clipboard and control-v paste thing. Hey, its like my friend's motto, that never had a driver's license. "If you don't have one, then they can't take it away".:eek:
Oh yeah, it used to say FOCKe wUlf under my avatar too.

waveblaster
05-22-2006, 02:13 PM
I'm really keen to build one of these. I dont know why, but Ive always liked the look of the UHU. Ive spent quite some time searching the internet for info. Finally I found your work. one thing is for sure it is truly a unique aircraft to model.

regards

Greg

Bill G
05-22-2006, 10:58 PM
I'm really keen to build one of these. I dont know why, but Ive always liked the look of the UHU. Ive spent quite some time searching the internet for info. Finally I found your work. one thing is for sure it is truly a unique aircraft to model.

regards

Greg

There seems to be a lot of info on it. Just not much rc interest. Saw one kit by Combat Models, or some similar name like that. I saw it in British Flying Scale, and had to have one. They seem to model more interesting stuff.

Bill G
05-28-2006, 12:59 AM
Definitely the most intricate birdcage I've scratchbuilt yet. Uses masking tape to mask off the glass. Used a hobby Exacto knife to cut out all the window frames. A bit tedious, as you have to score the tape, and pull it away, with the window frames being about 1/16 to 3/32" wide.

When painting, you want to use a number of light coats, sprayed from a distance, so as not to go on too wet and bleed under the tape. Fortunately, I learned this at about age 12, when I decided to finish off a fairly nice 55 Chevy model (well, nice for age 12) by masking the windows and spraying the body. The paint bleed all over the glass from the tape edges.

This birdcage canopy turned out better than expected, considering the shape and glass panels aren't exactly 100% scale. You'll have that, when you cut up and glue together 2 GWS ME109, and 2 GWS A-10 canopies, to make a FW189 cocpit. The first photo shows the mask off. The second is the result, after picking off all the tape sections.

Bill G
05-30-2006, 05:05 AM
This plane will have a dark green/lighter green camo job, with yellow theatre markings and light blue underside. I've found the green Olive Drab Flat Monokote to be a good base for several reasons:
1. It may be a bit heavier than some coverings, but weight is saved in using much less paint to cover it with green paints, common in warbirds.
2. The flat finish takes paint well with no surface preparation, and is much more flake resistant than painting over gloss coverings.
About the only drawback is that it is a bit harder to work with than gloss coverings, due to lower stretch factor. I found it not to be a problem, as I wrapped the booms with single pieces. The compound curves on this plane are slight, so its not too bad.

The canopy fits nice. The front locates perfectly, with the removable pilot instrument and floor section locating it in place. In the rear, I glued in a cross bar made from a piece of CF spar, with a rare earth magnet glued to it. The mating magnet is glued to another small piece of CF spar, glued to the wing. These little Radio Shack magnets are strong enough that a piece of the plane will rip out with them, if not well attached.

Another nice piece is the new DuBro Hatch Latch. Used for battery door. I've been fabbing my own latches, but this is much easier. I got my LHS to order them, and bought one. Went back for another, and they sold all 15 or so, and are reordering. I imagine people are buying them for planes like the PKZ P51, known to lose battery doors.

I also learned something new about the house. I started painting at night, on the back porch, and the light went off. Thought it burnt out, but went in, and turned it back on, and it lit. Thought there may be a bad fixture connection or wall switch, needing attention. The light went out again, so I went back in and turned it on. This time, I kept a keen eye on the upper doorway glass, where I could see if anyone went to turn off the second switch on the 3-way circuit. Nobody there, but light went out again.:confused: Well, it turns out that there is yet another switch in the circuit, up in the kitchen, that I didn't know about. My only comment was, "Didn't you think we had a ghost or something, after tuning the light off on me for the 3rd time, and having it come back on again?":eek: No comment.

Grasshopper
05-30-2006, 05:12 AM
Nice looking build Bill. What did you make the canopy out of? I've been thinking of getting another E-Flite P-47, shaving the fuse down, glassing it and making a bubble top out of it. I wasn't sure if I could get a bubble canopy or make one. Not sure of the scale either. A guy at the LHS told me to make a form and try heating a clear plastic coke bottle over it with a heat gun.

Tom

Bill G
05-30-2006, 11:04 PM
Nice looking build Bill. What did you make the canopy out of? I've been thinking of getting another E-Flite P-47, shaving the fuse down, glassing it and making a bubble top out of it. I wasn't sure if I could get a bubble canopy or make one. Not sure of the scale either. A guy at the LHS told me to make a form and try heating a clear plastic coke bottle over it with a heat gun.

Tom

The canopy was low cost. Its made from 2 GWS ME109 replacement canopies joined together for the front section. They were both trimmed differently for the top and bottom halves, and joined together. The glue line is painted for one of the window frames, so you don't see the glue. the center section is made from clear packaging flat plastic, creased where It needed to be. The rear conical section is made from 2 GWS A10 canopy rear sections, glued together to make a cone. The canopies are around $1.50 each. I got them from Allerc.

For the P47, I'm sure some airplane's replacement canopy would work for what you want to do.

Bill G
06-03-2006, 06:07 AM
Completed, with the exceptions of installing the Spektrum receiver, learning how to program it, and probably 1/2oz extra nose weight to be added in each cowl. I'm actually surprised that it looks relatively close to the plane it was modelled after in Flying Scale Mag (seen in first pic), considering it has a GWS C-47 wing, with the chord too deep.
Oh yeah, also need to find a better representation of the cowl insignia of a German cartoon character that looks somewhat like Daffy Duck. The ones I've found so far aren't clear enough.

Update: Well it wasn't Daffy Duck. Its actually another one that looks more like Peter Piper. Searched for hours on need Goggles, finally found both of them in 3min on Ask.com.
Made decent cowl insignia stickers from prints of it.

Bill G
10-17-2007, 02:41 AM
Flew well. Took off from the park road. I landed in high grass, since the plane has GWS micro retracts. You don't land a 30oz plane on GWS micro retracts. I'm lucky it wasn't a wobbly drunk on takeoff.:D Now that it flys well, I plan to install stronger retracts.

The grass landing was just a hair rougher than I would have liked, and I ended up tearing the tailwheel ply mounting bracket off of the elevator, and tore 1 control arm out of a rudder.
Epoxied back in and touched up paint in 5 minutes. Good as new.

Alpea42
01-05-2008, 04:11 AM
Great looking scratch build how come u didn't win the prize.Oh I know the DC 3 wing that grew booms and an extra rudder.LOL

Alpea42
01-05-2008, 04:14 AM
Maybe Saucer guy could copy your resourcefullness and build a saucer with a toilet seat

billromo
05-24-2009, 02:19 AM
After some research, this the best I've seen on the UHU. I entend to follow you and build a FW 189. A novice to RC, but boomers are a favorite, especially the UHU. I've ordered parts and will start building this summer. Wish me (others) luck. From central Texas.

Rolling Thunder
05-24-2009, 02:48 AM
Holly Molly...I see 4 street signs,5 parking post,high lines & plane eating trees everywhere!
I am in awe http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=44838&stc=1&thumb=1&d=1192585300 (http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=44838&d=1192585300)