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rlfgary
05-24-2006, 03:42 PM
I'm trying to find some way of slowing down my GWS Warbirds so that I crash less often on landing. Anyone have any experience using "flaperons"? I have a computer radio and plenty of servos. How do you set them up? Use them etc.? Let me know. I have a brushed Corsair (400 motor), and a brushless ME 109 (BP 21 awesome motor for price!). Both fly very well, but landings are FAST! :)
Thanks for any input.

redgiki
05-24-2006, 08:12 PM
Truth be told, the best way to slow down your planes for landing is to build them lighter :)

That said, if you have full-edge ailerons, flaperons work great. I have the Futaba 6exa transmitter, and setting up flaperons is as easy as turning on the FLPR function for that plane, and then setting a flap trim in the FLTR screen. Without FLTR, you just have ailerons with separate servos. With FLTR on, you can set your flaps at any percentage from 0% to 30% (normal-ish) to 100% (dangerous).

Flaperons will also occupy my one available mix on my radio (starting to lust for more, actually), adding a bit of elevator one way or the other when I engage them. It's not perfect, but my landings tend to be a pretty consistent speed these days so the mixes are tuned pretty well.

That said, be careful with outboard ailerons and flaperon functionality. I've found on some of my birds that outboard flaps make a normally-stable aircraft very unstable on landing. Be sure you try out the flaps at high altitude a few times before trying to land with them.

Have you fully explored the performance envelope of your planes in the air, though? If your approach is correct, your plane should be sinking on its own due to loss of energy, but with the nose pointing parallel to the ground, or just slightly below the horizon. If the approach is too fast, often being OVERBUILT or NOSE-HEAVY is the culprit. If you move your CG aft, you'll often find your approach speeds dramatically decrease.

Flaps increase the complexity of landing, which is already a pretty complicated process, and are just one more thing to forget or screw you up. Your GWS warbirds, while fast on approach (like all warbirds), should nevertheless slow down pretty well due to their light wing loading.

qban_flyer
05-24-2006, 09:43 PM
If I used flaperons on my GWS Zero, the extra weight of the servo and linkage will make a light weight, but HOT on approach plane much worse to control. :o

True flaps would be a solution, though I can't picture myself cutting two new ailerons out of balsa, dividing them into aileron and flap portions just to experiment. The very reason I have no retracts on my Zero. It is too involved and the probable benefits may not warrant the effort and extra weight. :o

spinnetti
06-01-2006, 10:05 PM
I'm trying to find some way of slowing down my GWS Warbirds so that I crash less often on landing. Anyone have any experience using "flaperons"? I have a computer radio and plenty of servos. How do you set them up? Use them etc.? Let me know. I have a brushed Corsair (400 motor), and a brushless ME 109 (BP 21 awesome motor for price!). Both fly very well, but landings are FAST! :)
Thanks for any input.

Yeah, time and experience are about the only cure.
You need to build light, and should be able to build at about 13oz without landing gear.
Flaps are cool, but just make it heavier. I'll do it eventually for scale, but light weight and experience are really where you need to be.

rcers
06-01-2006, 10:40 PM
That said, be careful with outboard ailerons and flaperon functionality. I've found on some of my birds that outboard flaps make a normally-stable aircraft very unstable on landing
Exactly correct. Full span ok Tip ailerons NOT OK. This tends to make them tip stall easier...

You have the right advice lighter and just do whole flights of landings....take off land take off land...

You will get it. Actually they are pretty well behaved! You should try a full house ship with 30+oz/ft wing loading...that makes you understand how to land warbirds!

Mike

darkside212
06-02-2006, 03:27 AM
I agree the added weight pretty much cancels out the "performance" of the flaps...but man it sure is cool to have flaps :)

redgiki
06-02-2006, 03:15 PM
Yep, that's only reason I ever used flaps on my foam warbirds: Style points :)

Geoff_Gino
06-02-2006, 03:36 PM
Exactly correct. Full span ok Tip ailerons NOT OK. This tends to make them tip stall easier...

You have the right advice lighter and just do whole flights of landings....take off land take off land...

You will get it. Actually they are pretty well behaved! You should try a full house ship with 30+oz/ft wing loading...that makes you understand how to land warbirds!

Mike

These guys are quite correct. Flaperons on warbirds that have the ailerons towards the wingtips stall very quickly and usually do not recover from a stall on a landing approach. If you really think you need them rather consider "spoilerons" (i.e. both ailerons up) to slow the plane down. Most glider pilots use this method. The "clean up" is a lot quicker if you need to go around.

rlfgary
06-02-2006, 10:18 PM
Thanks for the advice! I tried the "flaperons" and as described, they tend to make the Corsair unstable (just the opposite of what I am looking for!). The GWS Corsair does have outboard ailerons.

redgiki
06-03-2006, 05:09 PM
Spoilerons don't make a plane slow down on landing. They actually speed it up.

What they do is make your "sink rate" much faster. If your approach is high, or your airplane is a floater, spoilers will help you land it in conditions which otherwise are adverse, such as a short landing field, strong headwind, or botched approach.

If they are outboard spoilerons, they will reduce tip-stalling tendencies on landing, at the expense of coming down hard on your gear :)

spinnetti
06-14-2006, 02:14 AM
Spoilerons don't make a plane slow down on landing. They actually speed it up.

What they do is make your "sink rate" much faster. If your approach is high, or your airplane is a floater, spoilers will help you land it in conditions which otherwise are adverse, such as a short landing field, strong headwind, or botched approach.

If they are outboard spoilerons, they will reduce tip-stalling tendencies on landing, at the expense of coming down hard on your gear :)

Yeah! Thats what I thought too!

If you want flaps, just split them, mix them to the aileron to keep full ailerons, and put your flap switch just on the inboard part.. cool to look at if nothing else.

Splatz
06-14-2006, 04:31 PM
My friend has a GWS Corsair with flaps set up killer. It takes a while to dial it in (at high altitude). The key is mixing in down elevator. The first test he did shot the planes nose straight up. It looks like air brakes now. On aproach, 2 feet of the deck. He flicks the switch and it just floats down.

Bill G
06-14-2006, 06:35 PM
My friend has a GWS Corsair with flaps set up killer. It takes a while to dial it in (at high altitude). The key is mixing in down elevator. The first test he did shot the planes nose straight up. It looks like air brakes now. On aproach, 2 feet of the deck. He flicks the switch and it just floats down.

I think the Corsair would be cool with functional flaps. They look really cool on Corsairs. Its also supposedly the best flying GWS warbird, making it more feasible to add a bit of weight and mods too. These ideas shouldn't pe posted becuase they tend to make us go out an spend money.:eek: Cool idea Splatz.