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View Full Version : I'm on a 'has anyone done' rant.....


warbird@home
05-28-2006, 11:07 AM
A Fairy Gannet ?
A Provost (Jet) ?
A Amstrong Siddley Sea Hawk?
A Wyvern ?
A Folland Gnat?
A Percival Pembroke?
A Scottish Aviation Twin Pioneer?
A Avro Anson?
A Blackburn Firebrand?
A Bristol Brigand?
A Fairy Battle?
A Short Sunderland?
A Martin Baker MB5?

Just curious.......it is great with all the Spits, P51's etc etc but I just wondered if anyone had ventured into the 'twilight zone' of model aviation :D

p.s this will show how old you are for sure ::rolleyes:

simibill
05-28-2006, 02:49 PM
I'm guessing you are a Brit?

warbird@home
05-28-2006, 03:06 PM
I'm guessing you are a Brit?

good call,:) yup I am..:D .living in holland though..........Hey I also love the American stuff too !! especially some of Bell's experimental stuff !!....Airacuda YFM-1, Airacomet XP59-A, P39 Airacobra..Curtiss P-36,,

Bill G
05-28-2006, 03:12 PM
I'm sure people have. Probably not here though. More into flat foam profile flyers.

thomdoe
05-28-2006, 05:19 PM
Bill G, I just think flat foam has opened up a whole new area for people to build cheep. Also where I live it is very hard to find 50ft. of open space. flat foam lets me fly in a very small space. I grew up in Ca. and we use to have open fields, BUT no longer. Keith

Bill G
05-28-2006, 07:17 PM
Bill G, I just think flat foam has opened up a whole new area for people to build cheep. Also where I live it is very hard to find 50ft. of open space. flat foam lets me fly in a very small space. I grew up in Ca. and we use to have open fields, BUT no longer. Keith

I hear you Keith. It was really meant to be more of a crack.:eek: Not exactly the place to find stuff like that.
You should come here. The park 2 blocks form home is probably about 4 square miles in size. On average, there may be about 20 people in the whole place. Last evening, I flew in the large opening field. Larger than 4 football fields. Nobody there, nice evening to boot. The next field back is much larger, and never has anybody there. Well, most of the time. One time I went to test out my Arado scratch build, and there was a couple....:eek: I called off the flight. I wasn't going to the other field, because the grass is cut, and not 2 feet high, which is good for testing park size planes.

On the "guessing the thread starter was a Brit", I knew he wasn't. They're the ones who model all these obscure planes. Thanks to British Flying Scale, I'm building a FW189 now. Never see stuff like that in the US. Only flat foamies.:eek:

airmail wf
05-28-2006, 08:58 PM
Man, there isn't to many times that people in CA. are envious of us in PA. but check this out. I have 5 parks within 5 minutes of my house. One has lights on all night. If one is busy I just head out to the next. Plus I play basketball at 3 different gyms after ball I get to fly for about 2 hours before I'm out of batteries.

Keith, Sorry you can't find a place to fly. That might be the price you pay for perfect weather.:D

tim hooper
05-28-2006, 09:17 PM
A Short Sunderland?


I've seen the Sunderland belonging to Peter Angus fly at several displays over the apst few years. It's scratchbuilt...

More here;

http://www.peterangus.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/sunderland.htm
http://www.peterangus.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/SlandL.jpg

thomdoe
05-28-2006, 09:26 PM
Bill G and airmail wf, the sun is nice, but to always wait in line just to use a park !! I am envious of you in PA. large open spaces. I don't think I know what looks like. Yes I do, if you DRIVE 100 miles into the desert....... HEY LOOK OPEN SPACE. Keith

Bill G
05-29-2006, 05:57 AM
I've seen the Sunderland belonging to Peter Angus fly at several displays over the apst few years. It's scratchbuilt...

More here;

http://www.peterangus.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/sunderland.htm
http://www.peterangus.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/SlandL.jpg

I believe that was featured in Model Airplane News, about a year ago. If not MAN, some other major mag, either way, the guy won the photo contest, and got a years subscripton and some other prizes. It was shown in the water. I thought it had more weathering on the hull, but I think it is the same one, as there are not too many.

For those who read Flying Scale, I believe the following have been shown, at least in small fight photos, in recent times. Probably more, from the original list.
A Fairy Gannet
A Wyvern
A Folland Gnat
A Avro Anson

Sky Sharkster
05-29-2006, 01:06 PM
I've been following this thread and wanted to add my $.02; I don't think the shortage of unusual aircraft in model form is caused by a lack of desire, it's more a lack of experience. A large percentage of electric flyers are new to modeling altogether; They start out with foam "beginners" models and move along to advanced foam models; later, time and space (and willingness) permitting, they may try balsa kits. How long does it take to go from there to "Scratch" building at a high level? Years, decades?
Virtually all the models mentioned are not available in kit form. It is a big step to find and order a set of plans, convert them to model construction, adapt that to electric power, then build the model well enough to fly. If we check back in ten years or so, it may well be the "new" flyers of today have done it, but for now the "crossover" modelers, those who have built and flown other types of R/C FF or C/L would likely be the only ones to attempt it.
Another factor in kit availability is sales potential; If you were starting a kit company and wanted to get off to a good start, would you offer a Mustang or a Folland Gnat? Your priority is to make money so you can stay in business and make more kits. My hat is off to the small companies that market kits and plans for unusual models, they provide a valuable service to folks like us that are willing to build the less-known aircraft. But they still have to pay the rent (figuratively speaking) so there'll always be the Spitfire/Mustang/Spad/Fokker offerings.
As more modelers become proficient flyers they will look for different aircraft; But I believe electric power is too new as yet to see this on as high a level as, say, glow power. It will happen, though!
Ron

Bill G
05-29-2006, 06:41 PM
How long does it take to go from there to "Scratch" building at a high level? Years, decades?
Ron

Neither. My first kit was a HOB Electric P-51, several weeks into the hobby. Next, 50+inch span 200% Guillows scratch build F.., well you know, can't say it :eek:-190, soon following, ME262 no plans scratchbuild, etc, etc. Only been at this 2 some years. Can post again and call it arrogant or whatever wish, but its not really the issue. Some people have it, some don't. If they have it, it takes no time to achieve high levels, if they don't it may never happen. Why? Because the skills needed to scratch build at a high level have been developed in all previous years in life, back to age 4, or even earlier. If you've put your time in at modeling and designing mechanisms, then you're qualified day one. If not, then you'll have to put your time in. It not really just about modelling airplanes. Its about developing design and modelling skills in general. Not exclusive to model airplanes.
My 20 bucks worth
I have a bad disk, not even worth bending over for 2 cents

warbird@home
05-29-2006, 07:24 PM
I have read with interest how this thread has developed, and there have been some very valuable points made, but I want to make it perfectly clear that my intention was to ask the advice of anyone who had built/designed any of these planes! It is a wish list for my own personal airforce.!!..I have been building for quite a while and have found that the more people who give informed input, the better my end result is !! Thats why I am subscribed here and on the E-Zone.....
IMHO any development/progress comes with time, experience and enthusiasm, and no small measure of each !! to me, this hobby is all about learning/growing, exchanging ideas........and innovation......I love it for all of those reasons........I am of the "love building" "love flying" variety of modeller, so never have a
dull moment....if I am not building, I'm flying and if Im not doing either of these Im planning and doing research, hence the thread...thanks guys for the input..........

happy landings to all..

cheers for now

Ray

Bill G
05-30-2006, 02:30 AM
I have read with interest how this thread has developed, and there have been some very valuable points made, but I want to make it perfectly clear that my intention was to ask the advice of anyone who had built/designed any of these planes!

Ray

Well then it looks like Tim Hooper and I are the only ones that gave any kind of relevant answer to the original question. A few other seemingly off topic replys in good cheer, and another in seemingly rebuttle dissertation mode.

eflight-ray
05-30-2006, 08:08 PM
I noticed that Traplet Plans do a Westland Wyvern and an Avro Anson in fairly decent sizes, 65" span and 84" span.

Admittedly they are for those noisey, smelly, dirty, power systems, but at least an electric builder can lighten them and get them to fly properly.

I think I have seen most of those models listed, in the mags over the years, though whether plans exist is another problem.

warbird@home
05-31-2006, 05:00 AM
I noticed that Traplet Plans do a Westland Wyvern and an Avro Anson in fairly decent sizes, 65" span and 84" span.

Admittedly they are for those noisey, smelly, dirty, power systems, but at least an electric builder can lighten them and get them to fly properly.

I think I have seen most of those models listed, in the mags over the years, though whether plans exist is another problem.

Thanks Ray in Wales, from Ray in Holland

PoseidonSv
09-13-2006, 12:32 PM
Does someone have a scale drawing of the Hunting Percival Pembroke?

I am totally new to electric powered airplanes and i have started building a Regianne 2000 aircraft from scratch in Balsa wood.

My next projects is to build electric powered Hunting Percival Pembroke C Mk.52 .

And a dream is to build a Spirtfire PR. Mk XIX.

Since my father was responsible for the Alvis Leonides Engines in the airforce and all other piston engines before is an aircraft that is interrwesting for me.

Also it is well suited for belly landing on grass.

Im not old enough and have not started with ready to fly kits so you can not say now newbies build balsa aircraft with scale like appearance.

Fredrik in Sweden.

nitram
10-14-2006, 05:01 PM
Warbirds. Robbe made a foam Gnat. The prolific Chris Golds designed and flew a Sea Hawk (may be a Traplet plan) a couple of years ago and in the latest Q&EFI he features an MB 5 built by a correspondent.

nitram
10-14-2006, 05:06 PM
Forgot (shows how old I am. Duncan Hutson built an Anson

Curtis
10-14-2006, 08:15 PM
I hope the models fly better than the originals! There are good reasons that planes like the Fairy Battle didn't make it much past 1940. Even some of the German's lumbering twin ground attack planes could shoot them down!