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GallopingGhost
09-03-2005, 07:41 PM
I remimber reading a post somewhere that suggested blue fan fold and hot melt glue was ok to do. Rather than have a plane blow apart in the air I thought I would ask first:). If it does work is it low temp or the high temp? How about Depron?

giflyrc
09-03-2005, 08:46 PM
I can't say about depron but I use hot melt glue all the time on my blue FFF birds and it is very sturdy. also it is regular high temp stuff

Only time I have had glue joint failure has been when doing figure 9's

flypaper 2
09-03-2005, 11:23 PM
nice menagerie, My kind of stuff:D I use a hot glue gun for field repairs. Hooked to a 200 watt inverter and a 12 volt batt that I use for charging plane batts. I think other people use it more than I do but that's fine with me. Keeps people flying.

Matt Kirsch
09-04-2005, 01:34 AM
The U Can Do 3D EP I'm reviewing for our sister site, rcuniverse.com, recommends low-temp hot melt glue for ALL assembly. The plane itself appears to be an EPP skeleton with EPP sheeting.

I did try my high-temp hot-melt gun, but it tended to melt the EPP foam unless I was very careful about how much glue I used. EPP and FFF are different foams, so I'm not sure if this really applies, but might be food for thought....

giflyrc
09-04-2005, 01:18 PM
Some melt in is desirable as it increases the glued surface otherwise no melt in produces a weaker joint IMO

Roger aka GIFLYRC

beamerdr
09-04-2005, 01:40 PM
I use hot melt on all of my fff fomies. the only problem I have had is when I leave one in my car in the sun. The glue can let lose.:o

Scott

2dogrc
09-05-2005, 05:33 PM
Works good on my WWII planes. Holds togther even after mid-airs. Just test the heat first. The dollar store has a good gun, and you can guess the price!

GallopingGhost
09-14-2005, 10:22 PM
Hey this Hot melt works great! Thanks for the replies. I found a dual heat gun at Harbor Freight Tools for the huge sum of $1.70 that is just right. Its easy to add weight with it so I have to watch that. The bonds seem stronger than the foam which is about all you can ask.

IFLYRC5
09-16-2005, 03:51 AM
I used the Low Temp on 2 of my fancy foam planes with about 20 flights each in 90 degree weather and so far so good. One this I did at the recommendation fo the FFfolks was to wrap the HS55 servos with clear packing tape prior to gluing - only takes a minute and will be better on the servo when I need to remove it.

Ted in Indy

Ron
09-27-2005, 12:34 AM
I have used some of the hot melt glue too.....seems to work OK, but it seems that it does not like to get wet....have had several occasions in rain where it comes apart.

defranci
09-27-2005, 12:43 AM
Low temp works well with FFF. The trick is to use low temp glue sticks. The dual temp sticks don't make quite as srtong a joint.
Don

flyboyanderson
12-05-2005, 10:47 PM
Hey Galloping Ghost, I have a Rand LR3 practically new. God I hated that old RC stuff.:mad:

savydad
12-06-2005, 05:14 AM
I've used it on several foamies, it's the only glue I use. I think I have the low temp, but not sure. I find that if I hold the tip right, melting the foam a bit in front of the glue, it makes the joint much stronger. My wife already had the gun and a 100pack of sticks so it didn't cost me a penny! It is so much easier to work with than any other glue, and no need to wait for anything to dry for long periods, quickest way to throw an experiment together!

Todd

Thermal
12-20-2005, 01:11 AM
I use the low temp glue and have had no problems. You can get the glue gun and the sticks at Wal-Mart for next to nothing.

Bob

Twmaster
12-20-2005, 04:31 AM
I use the low temp glue and have had no problems. You can get the glue gun and the sticks at Wal-Mart for next to nothing.

Bob

Harbor freight too. I think I paid less than $4 for a big bag of glue sticks and a glue gun.

Ron S
12-26-2005, 03:37 AM
All my planes are built with the (low temp) hot glue. For really strong bonding,ie; motor mounts,I use epoxy,or gorrilla glue. Once you learn the tricks of using the hot glue gun,you will never go back to regular glue! Ron:)

Normsthename
12-29-2005, 10:44 PM
I have just bought a Butane powered Hot Glue Gun, and it works fantastic!
It take 3-4 minutes to warm up and It came with two rechargable 'Energy Cells' that you refill with a Butane aerosol (Lighter fuel).
One fillup lasts for hours
I thought it would be a good tool for when I was out flying for quick repairs.
But I used it to glue a tricky bit on a Depron model, and ended up building the whole model with it :lol:
It was a little heavier than using CA, but it was strong and fast, and anyway it had a bigger motor in it to compensate :)

Andy

Ron S
12-29-2005, 11:29 PM
That gun sounds like it would be handy for the field! Who makes it,and where can you get it? Also the more you use the gun,the better you will get with it,and you will use less glue.;) Ron

Normsthename
12-30-2005, 12:16 AM
That gun sounds like it would be handy for the field! Who makes it,and where can you get it? I Live in the UK and bought mine from Maplins
I believe the equivalent shop in the USA is Radio Shack
Here is the link to the UK site so you can see the Specs etc

http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=47888&criteria=hot%20glue%20gun&doy=30m12

Andy

Ron S
12-30-2005, 04:29 AM
Thanks for the info. Andy! Ron:)

Jeremy Z
01-12-2006, 06:31 PM
A tip for using hot glue guns: When you're done laying the glue, only pull the tip of the gun away from the work a couple inches. Hold it there for a few seconds, and the "string" will dry. Then, when you pull it away, the "string" will already by dry, and it will break instead of laying these tiny little strings all over everything.

rhaskin
01-12-2006, 07:56 PM
A tip for using hot glue guns: When you're done laying the glue, only pull the tip of the gun away from the work a couple inches. Hold it there for a few seconds, and the "string" will dry. Then, when you pull it away, the "string" will already by dry, and it will break instead of laying these tiny little strings all over everything.
Hey that's a good idea, thanks for the tip. The only problem I see with that is that usually when I am glueing a joint I have to put the glue gun down quickly so that I can press the parts together. If I waited on the glue "string" to dry, so would my joint! lol
-Rick

flypaper 2
01-13-2006, 12:34 AM
Another trick. After you run a bead, wet your finger really well and run it down the bead. It will flatten down the bead and help cool it. Make sure your finger's really wet. Hot glue really sticks to dry skin!!!!

Jeremy Z
01-13-2006, 05:22 AM
Another trick. After you run a bead, wet your finger really well and run it down the bead. It will flatten down the bead and help cool it. Make sure your finger's really wet. Hot glue really sticks to dry skin!!!!

Yes, and make sure you don't try this when the gun's set to high temperature! My wife got second degree burns by accidentally slopping some hot glue on her finger on the hot setting. It was a nasty experience for her. She was glueing cinnamon sticks to candles, being all crafty & girly. I told her: "NOW you can imagine how I got all the scars on my hands, hehehe."

Jeremy

skiman762
03-23-2006, 02:16 PM
a little dishwashing liquid in water works great lets your finger slide over the seam for a nice smooth fillet a trick they use caulking tubs and such