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-   -   Landing practice (http://www.Wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=73125)

DavidR8 02-02-2014 06:38 PM

Landing practice
 
I have access to a private field which is terrific. The only downside is that it is a hay field so ground takeoffs and landings are a no-go.

I'm have a Super Cub and a Fun Cub. So far I've only flown the Super Cub, hand launched with the gear off and done belly landings. I'm going to try the Fun Cub today to see if she can manage the terrain.

Any hints on setting up for and executing reasonable landings?

pizzano 02-02-2014 07:13 PM

What happened to access of the "clear pasture".....?

DavidR8 02-02-2014 07:21 PM

It is clear
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pizzano (Post 938935)
What happened to access of the "clear pasture".....?

It's clear pasture as in there are no trees or anything else to eat my planes. The ground is level but not smooth. It is truly pasture land which is used for hay production in the growing seasons. The land owner will fertilize in March and shortly thereafter the new crop will emerge.

Because it's used for hay production the stubble is long, perhaps 4"-5".

I had my first extended flying session there yesterday. It's terrific, the area is about 400' x 600' with the prevailing wind coming down its length.

fhhuber 02-02-2014 08:55 PM

LAy a carpet over the grass for a runway that you can roll up. (might need a pretty large rug...) You can sometimes get a carpet dealer to let you grab used carpet from their dumpster for this.

This will work while the stubble is short and allow normal take-offs and landings.

For grass landings with foamies yo may want to "armor" the plane with a couple of layers of clear packing tape to help prevent the grass from slowly shredding the foam. Don't cover the whole plane, just the belly and leading edges where the grass will probably have started dinging the foam already.

zoltron55 02-02-2014 09:02 PM

the way I was taught was, landing is just level flight close to the ground. when I was learning I would use up 2 batteries a session just taking off do a n initial turn then land over & over. practice makes perfect keep at it

Yakfishingfool 02-02-2014 10:21 PM

throw a mower in the back and mow a run way for yourself. Of course you should ask first, but he may go for 3x50 foot runway.

DavidR8 02-03-2014 01:30 AM

Might not go for this
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Yakfishingfool (Post 938963)
throw a mower in the back and mow a run way for yourself. Of course you should ask first, but he may go for 3x50 foot runway.

That's a possibility but it's a working farm and I'm on a month of probation. :-) the first flight there was was less than great as I had a servo wire come loose and my Cub ended up on the machine shed roof.... Not so good..

Where I live finding a suitable field and then obtaining rights is extremely difficult. I secured this area because I know the owners of the horse farm down the road. But the conditions are that it is only me and only electrics.

I have to stay off the field after March because then it's into hay season. We can get three cuts of hay during a year so it's a money maker. I can still overfly but need to be very aware of where I'm landing.

quorneng 02-03-2014 03:40 PM

DavidR8
You may have to accept that take offs are not really practical in your situation and as a result any undercarriage becomes a liability.
My field is at least grass but it is would be called 'the light rough' in golfing terms so I quickly bowed to the inevitable and got used to hand/launch belly land and fly suitable planes.

On the positive side at least you won't have to worry about the complication of retracts on a scale job!

hayofstacks 02-03-2014 05:10 PM

I find parking lots make good runways. They generally get plowed too.

I used to fly at schools and parks alot. Shooting for sidewalk in a crosswind gets you pretty good.

Mainly i now fly at a church parking lot. Giant east-west and north-sơuth runway. Only stipulation is to respect the grounds. Ill pick up trash while im out there and always clean up my cig butts, and no problems. Also has a baseball feild, and has two school feilds and a vacant feild. You will find a good place to fly sooner or later.

DavidR8 02-03-2014 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hayofstacks (Post 939052)
I find parking lots make good runways. They generally get plowed too.

I used to fly at schools and parks alot. Shooting for sidewalk in a crosswind gets you pretty good.

Mainly i now fly at a church parking lot. Giant east-west and north-sơuth runway. Only stipulation is to respect the grounds. Ill pick up trash while im out there and always clean up my cig butts, and no problems. Also has a baseball feild, and has two school feilds and a vacant feild. You will find a good place to fly sooner or later.

The large school yard where I sometimes fly (requires an 0800 hrs on site start time to avoid the hoards of footballers that arrive at 1000hrs) does have a long strip of asphalt pretty much in the middle of the field.

Could be a good place to practice approaches...

rcers 02-03-2014 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DavidR8 (Post 939056)
The large school yard where I sometimes fly (requires an 0800 hrs on site start time to avoid the hoards of footballers that arrive at 1000hrs) does have a long strip of asphalt pretty much in the middle of the field.

Could be a good place to practice approaches...

A great idea and plan. My advice go for it... Take all your batteries. Take-off, land, repeat. Do this for the entire flight time. Really work on approach control using both throttle and elevator.

After about 20 packs of doing this - you will be MUCH more comfy. Landings are mandatory and very important. :)

Then do tough and go's for about the same number of packs. Now the landing skills are really becoming habit.

Mike

dereckbc 02-04-2014 04:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcers (Post 939059)
Then do tough and go's for about the same number of packs.

Well when I do Tough and Go's, it is more Tough than Go :)

pizzano 02-04-2014 05:04 AM

Like many other's here, I've found the only way to get comfortable with landings is to spend time with each plane you own concentrating on just landing and launch (ROG) in my case......and lots of batteries......;).....touch & goes will come easier after you get the feel for each planes approach speeds (or lack there of) and length of space needed for touch downs.

rcers 02-04-2014 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dereckbc (Post 939138)
Well when I do Tough and Go's, it is more Tough than Go :)

LOL - I was in a cold haze. Touch baby....touch...

dahawk 02-04-2014 01:52 PM

With me, it's always a tough go !

DHC Beaver 02-04-2014 10:18 PM

One thing i would mention,if you're flying an aileron equipped plane,learn to use the rudder to line up to the runway.It's more effective at low speed,and also handy if you have a plane that wants to veer left (or right)on take off.

DavidR8 02-05-2014 02:24 AM

Thanks for the rudder tip
 
That has been useful!


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