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-   -   Origin of word used after a crash (http://www.Wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=73157)

kyleservicetech 02-08-2014 07:12 PM

Origin of word used after a crash
 
Manure. In the 16th and 17th centuries, everything had to be transported by ship and it was also before the invention of commercial fertilizers, so large shipments of manure were quite common.

It was shipped dry, because in dry form it weighed a lot less than when wet, but once water (at sea) hit it, not only did it become heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a byproduct is methane gas of course. As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can picture what could (and did) happen. Methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern, KA-BOOOOM!

Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was determined just what was happening

After that, the bundles of manure were always stamped with the
instruction:

Stow high in transit ' on them, which meant for the sailors to stow it high enough off the lower decks so that any water that came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the production of methane.

Thus evolved the term ' S.!.!.T ', (Stow High In Transit) which has come down through the centuries and is in use to this very day.

You probably did not know the true history of this word and neither did I. I had always thought it was a term used after your model airplane crashed.:D :D

Turner 02-09-2014 01:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech (Post 939472)
...I had always thought it was a term used after your model airplane crashed.:D :D

I spell that one differently.

pizzano 02-09-2014 03:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech (Post 939472)
Manure. In the 16th and 17th centuries, everything had to be transported by ship and it was also before the invention of commercial fertilizers, so large shipments of manure were quite common.

It was shipped dry, because in dry form it weighed a lot less than when wet, but once water (at sea) hit it, not only did it become heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a byproduct is methane gas of course. As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can picture what could (and did) happen. Methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern, KA-BOOOOM!

Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was determined just what was happening

After that, the bundles of manure were always stamped with the
instruction:

Stow high in transit ' on them, which meant for the sailors to stow it high enough off the lower decks so that any water that came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the production of methane.

Thus evolved the term ' S.!.!.T ', (Stow High In Transit) which has come down through the centuries and is in use to this very day.

You probably did not know the true history of this word and neither did I. I had always thought it was a term used after your model airplane crashed.:D :D

Another case of urban legend......Please.:rolleyes:

solentlife 02-09-2014 03:41 AM

It is a legend and actually most if these words came from Saxon or Viking origin.

Dog faeces was in fact a serious cargo.... it was required by leather tanning factories and cosmetics!

One of the worst methane sources on ship.... is fruit that is loaded late in harvest... it ripens on board and rots.

Nigel

Fishbonez 02-09-2014 03:50 AM

hmm and I thought it stood for Super High Intensity Training

kyleservicetech 02-09-2014 06:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fishbonez (Post 939501)
hmm and I thought it stood for Super High Intensity Training

LOL
I bet those four letters could be used in a thousand different analytic history studies! :D

kyleservicetech 02-09-2014 06:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pizzano (Post 939497)
Another case of urban legend......Please.:rolleyes:


Yup, it was posted in the wattflyer humor section :D

gramps2361 02-09-2014 02:35 PM

But it is on the internet it has to be true!;):Q

dahawk 02-09-2014 03:25 PM

But do you know Jack and his family history?

This is true and no meant to be obscene in any way

http://youtu.be/XuRwis3_iVk

Fishbonez 02-09-2014 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech (Post 939511)
LOL
I bet those four letters could be used in a thousand different analytic history studies! :D

I used to use it all the time
Soldier/Airman: This works Sucks
Sargent Fisher: Yes it does but its good S.H.I.T and I love giving you all plenty of S.H.I.T to do

:D

hkeelljr 02-12-2014 04:23 AM

Those four letters also come in handy say when you might nick yourself with a new blade, even if its after you see blood on the part you just cut out.


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