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-   -   High Shrink Covering? (http://www.Wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=74031)

eagle33 07-06-2014 07:00 PM

High Shrink Covering?
 
Can anyone recommend a good high-shrink covering material? I have a neat staggerwing beech I have finished and need to cover. It has a wingspan of 18 inches and will be an indoor flyer. I have tried both coverite and ultracote and I can't seem to get the wrinkles out after tacking around the edges. I'm now thinking about trying some light weight iron-on tissue using balsaloc. I'm sure open to any and all suggestions and/or recommendations.

thepiper92 07-06-2014 07:54 PM

What are you using to shrink. If a heat gun the air seems to push the covering so it doesn't shrink, but stretches and you end up with remaining wrinkles. You have to hit it at an angle. Ultracote parklite works fine for me.

thepiper92 07-06-2014 08:22 PM

You can try solar film, which is not solite, but a bit thicker.

Rodneh 07-06-2014 08:52 PM

On that small a model try the old "silkspan" and nitrate dope. Put the silkspan on wet (just damp, not wringing wet) and gently pull out any folds or wrinkles, let dry and then dope with thinned dope. You will wind up with a very taunt covering.

Stevephoon 07-06-2014 10:18 PM

I've had good luck with the ultra light iron on coverings. SoLite, and/or Coverite Microlite.

http://www.towerhobbies.com/products.../covq0240.html

Even the "Opaques" are still a little transparent, but it shrinks well for me. It shrinks at a lower temp than the heaver coverings.

Steve

thepiper92 07-07-2014 12:41 AM

I will never ever use Solite again. To hard to take the backing off, it doesn't adhere around edges well and like to creep. Never tried the Coverite stuff. Ultracote Parklite works well for me, but does show seams a bit.

solentlife 07-07-2014 06:11 AM

Dare I say ... for an indoor model ... old fashioned Tissue and Dope ?

I certainly wouldn't use Solarfiilm or any other standard weight film. Solarfilm is one of the best films - but too heavy for indoor.

Nigel

eagle33 07-07-2014 01:15 PM

The tissue/silkspan and dope is looking better and better.

eagle33 07-07-2014 01:27 PM

If I use silkspan and dope, can I then paint it? If so, what paint would be recommended? Acrylic or something else? I want to end up with a yellow staggerwing. I plan to use an airbrush.

Abuelo 07-07-2014 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eagle33 (Post 952422)
If I use silkspan and dope, can I then paint it? If so, what paint would be recommended? Acrylic or something else? I want to end up with a yellow staggerwing. I plan to use an airbrush.

Dope is a lacquer made up from nitrocellulose dissolved in a solvent, usually MEK or acetone. Any paint that will go over lacquer will work.

Aircraft spruce is a good mail order source and Randolph a good brand.

There are two types available and either will work for your application. Nitrate was the old free-flight favorite as it would shrink the covering slightly as it cured, then stop. It fell out of favor for a lot of reasons, not being hot fuel proof being one and being highly flammable is another. Butrate dope is fuel proof and shrinks, but it never stop shrinking and would eventually warp lightweight structures. We got around this by adding a few drops of glycerin to the container.

Clear dope and yellow tissue would look great on your staggering. I'd recommend a tautening nitrate but that is just personal preference.

Photos please when complete.

whitecrest 07-07-2014 04:46 PM

Consider using Doculam for your project. It is a laminating film that works well as an iron-on covering. I find that it shrinks very well and does not loosen over time. It will add considerable strength to a structure. Because it is crystal-clear after application, it needs to be painted. It takes most acrylic, water-based paints very well, so you can avoid the fumes and need for a well ventilated work area. It is available online from many sources and can sometimes be found in office supply stores.

carpetbagger 07-07-2014 06:17 PM

Japanese tissue. Comes in white, black, and many basic colors. You can put it on wet but dry is easier and it shrinks real well. So well on a lightweight frame it is advised to pre-shrink the Japanese tissue = brand name Esaki.

Rodneh 07-07-2014 06:53 PM

Whether you use silkspan or tissue, use Nitrate (not Butyrate) dope. You can not put any kind of paint over Butyrate other than more Butyrate. You can get both Nitrate or Butyrate in colors as well as clear. It is best to use clear to attach whichever of the coverings you choose. Either one (silkspan or tissue) requires that you coat them with dope after applying else they will soon tear or show wear at the slightest provocation. The lightest way is to use colored Japanese tissue attached and sealed with clear nitrate dope. Only use Butyrate as an over coat if you are using a glow or gasoline engine as nitrate is not fuel proof. The silkspan is slightly stronger than Japanese tissue if that needs to be a consideration and is slightly heavier but not usually enough to be of consideration.

carpetbagger 07-07-2014 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rodneh (Post 952433)
Whether you use silkspan or tissue, use Nitrate (not Butyrate) dope. You can not put any kind of paint over Butyrate other than more Butyrate. You can get both Nitrate or Butyrate in colors as well as clear. It is best to use clear to attach whichever of the coverings you choose. Either one (silkspan or tissue) requires that you coat them with dope after applying else they will soon tear or show wear at the slightest provocation. The lightest way is to use colored Japanese tissue attached and sealed with clear nitrate dope. Only use Butyrate as an over coat if you are using a glow or gasoline engine as nitrate is not fuel proof. The silkspan is slightly stronger than Japanese tissue if that needs to be a consideration and is slightly heavier but not usually enough to be of consideration.

Good summation, Rodneh. I've used Easki and silkspan, prefer Esaki, but my new fav covering is silk. At least for park flying size models. I have dyed silk with Rit to get colors, and also used Design Master floral paint which is a lacquer and goes over nitrate dope just dandy.


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