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-   -   StyroSpray 1000 (http://www.Wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=74430)

mytymedave 09-04-2014 02:07 PM

StyroSpray 1000
 
I read some posts from 2010 on StyroSpray 1000... I have used the product on 1 plane FRC Foamies Alpha Jet... The nose has a very hard surface with the product... I also covered the leading edges.. Being the first time using it I probably used a little too much... The knock on the product was that it may add too much weight... I had a discussion with Industrial Polymers (manufacturer) about how to reduce the weight factor... They suggested that I might use 3M Microballoons or Microspheres and it could reduce the weight by as much as 30%... The research I have done on the 3M product says it is a weight reducing filler for resins... I have ordered the 3M product and will report after I use it....

carpetbagger 09-04-2014 02:50 PM

I no nothing about StyroSpray 1000 but i like Microballoons - 3M calls them Micro bubbles and I get my stash from Aircraft Spruce. I am not sure how one could mix Microballoons with a spray-on glue. Microballoons will mix with any liquid glue but I use WEST resin - keep adding bubbles until the mix is stiff enough a peak won't slump. This thick paste uses very little resin. When cured it sands easily, and yes, it is light.

fhhuber 09-04-2014 02:58 PM

Microballoons can reduce the weight added for a volume of epoxy used to fill a gap by over 60%. IT all depends on how much microballoons vs how much epoxy to make up the mix.

I also have no experience with StyroSpray, but when I want the lightest microballoon filler possible I mix the epoxy, paint the area to be filled with some then mix in the microballoons. This ensures the surface on the structure has adequate epoxy for the stiff paste filler to stick. Otherwise you can mix in enough microballoons that the resulting filler won't stick to the model.

mytymedave 09-04-2014 04:44 PM

Styrospray 1000
 
StyroSpray is used in commercial applications to give a hard shell to foam projects ie; large figurines or signs... I use it to coat the nose and leading edges to protect against crashes or rough landings... Once I get the microballoons and use them I will post the result of the weight difference...

pmullen503 09-04-2014 04:48 PM

I've use Styrospray for a couple years and like it. I never thought of adding microballoons! You have to be careful not to get it too thick. The nice thing about Styrospray is that the brush marks will level out when applied at the right amount.

BTW, WOWplanes.com sells small amounts of Stryrospray as "liquid sheeting II".

DEG 09-04-2014 05:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pmullen503 (Post 956575)
I've use Styrospray for a couple years and like it. I never thought of adding microballoons! You have to be careful not to get it too thick. The nice thing about Styrospray is that the brush marks will level out when applied at the right amount.

BTW, WOWplanes.com sells small amounts of Stryrospray as "liquid sheeting II".

I've followed several of your build threads in which you use Styrospray quite often. Question--Would Styrospray hold up as a coating for a plug to be used for vacuum forming or would the heat bubble it??

pmullen503 09-04-2014 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DEG (Post 956576)
I've followed several of your build threads in which you use Styrospray quite often. Question--Would Styrospray hold up as a coating for a plug to be used for vacuum forming or would the heat bubble it??

It depends what's underneath. It works fine over a wood plug. It would probably work over a foam plug (with enough coats.) But I haven't tried that.

If what you make the plug out of can take the heat, then it's fine for putting a on hard surface you can sand and polish. It's very nice for making fiberglass molds from a foam plug.

DEG 09-04-2014 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pmullen503 (Post 956580)
It depends what's underneath. It works fine over a wood plug. It would probably work over a foam plug (with enough coats.) But I haven't tried that.

If what you make the plug out of can take the heat, then it's fine for putting a on hard surface you can sand and polish. It's very nice for making fiberglass molds from a foam plug.

I was thinking of both foam and balsa plugs. Foam plugs would be less costly and much easier to shape. I've had trouble with the grain/joints showing with balsa plugs no matter what finish I put on them. The heat of the plastic doesn't hit the plug but for a second, cools way down almost instantly. Guess I'll try it on foam and see...thanks for the link to a site with smaller units of this stuff.

BTW, I've watched the video on that web site...lol...I think they ought to pay you to make their videos....some excellent looking work comes out of your shop and shows up on your build threads.....

Thanks again....

Don

pmullen503 09-04-2014 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DEG (Post 956582)
I was thinking of both foam and balsa plugs. Foam plugs would be less costly and much easier to shape. I've had trouble with the grain/joints showing with balsa plugs no matter what finish I put on them. The heat of the plastic doesn't hit the plug but for a second, cools way down almost instantly. Guess I'll try it on foam and see...thanks for the link to a site with smaller units of this stuff.

BTW, I've watched the video on that web site...lol...I think they ought to pay you to make their videos....some excellent looking work comes out of your shop and shows up on your build threads.....

Thanks again....

Don

I can tell you that you can take dents out of finished planes using a damp rag and a covering iron to heat the dents. The foam underneath expands back to it's original shape. That's with only 3 light coats of SS. I think I would use 5 or 6 coats on a vacuform plug to start. The SS can take the heat, it's just a question of how much is transferred to the foam.

I have one experience where my oven malfunctioned and my fuselage was heated to at least 250F for several minutes. The foam expanded under the SS and distorted the shape. The SS was fine.

DEG 09-04-2014 10:18 PM

I've built an overhead drop-down oven so the plug doesn't see much heat at all until I drop the plastic on it. I probably should put a microswitch in the circuit to kill the current to the oven as I drop it down....now I do that manually...

I'll try SS on both foam and balsa and report back what the results are.....might even try a layer of glass cloth laid down with the first coat of SS...

Thanks again for sharing the info...

pmullen503 09-04-2014 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DEG (Post 956594)
I've built an overhead drop-down oven so the plug doesn't see much heat ..........

I'd like to see a photo of that! I use my household oven to heat the plastic.

DEG 09-05-2014 04:34 AM

Don't have a photo of it on hand but will take a couple tomorrow and post them.....Like most projects I design and build I have a few changes that I'd make if/when I build a new one. Nice thing is everything stays in my shop, no mess or smell in the kitchen....that pleases both me and the wife.

I started forming using the kitchen oven method but found that the material cooled a bit too fast from the oven to the vacuum box. I guess getting old slows one down a bit....lol

Anyway I'll be happy to share my thoughts on the one I built up.

pmullen503 09-05-2014 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DEG (Post 956613)
...............

I started forming using the kitchen oven method but found that the material cooled a bit too fast from the oven to the vacuum box. I guess getting old slows one down a bit....lol

Anyway I'll be happy to share my thoughts on the one I built up.




I'd like to see that. What did you use for a heat source?

Twalther 10-26-2014 04:43 PM

I have styrospray and I was wondering if I could pour it in windows to make a mold for them? Will it still cure?

pmullen503 10-27-2014 04:44 AM

Styrospray needs moisture from the air to cure, so thin layers work best. It's definitely not like an epoxy that will cure inside a mold.


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