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Old 09-28-2012, 04:02 PM   #15
AEAJR
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Originally Posted by AEAJR View Post
This is your build buddy, and I am not really a builder so take what I say with the usual grain of salt.

The original design was based on a heavy Speed 600 motor. You are going to put in a light brushless. So that weight has to be made up somehow.

Several people in our club built Bird of Time kits and some extended the nose to reduce the amount of lead needed to balance. Worked well but that long nose was much more prone to breakage. So a little bit heavier brushless with a bit less extension of the nose might not be a bad thing.

Just food for thought.
I should have added why that nose might be more prone to breakage.

Because gliders do not normally have landing gear, belly landing is the norm. As such the nose can take more of an impact than would normally be seen on a plane with landing grear. So a slightly nose low landing will be taken on that extended nose.

Again, I am no builder and don't even dream of telling you how to do your build. But if this is your first glider, these are factors that might not be apparent.

So some stronger stringers out to the nose, top and bottom, might be in order. The stress is more compressive, at the top of the fuse, than the bottom as wood tends to be strong in tension than compression.

Again this means weight in the nose which might reduce the length of the nose.

Don can probably speak to these things better than I can and he may even feel that my comments are not valid. I would accept his judgement. I only bring these up for your consideration before you apply glue to wood.

I think your greatest weight saving will be in the battery. I would expect the long nose/light motor to be a much smaller saving by comparision. So if you can find a way to move that battery forward as far as possible that would be an excellent way to make up for the light motor.

I had a Cox Dust Devil. ARF with a glass fuse. Built for a speed 600. Not easily extended so I ended up with a lot of lead in the nose, but I did reduce it some by moving that 3 cell lipo way forward. But even with all that lead I saved about 6 ounces just by changing to Lipo from NiCd.

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