Wattflyer RC Network: RC Universe :: RCU Magazine :: RCU Forums :: RCU Classifieds :: RCU User Reviews :: RCU YouTube
Home Who's Online Calendar Today's Posts RealTime Post Spy Mark Forums Read
Go Back   WattFlyer RC Electric Flight Forums - Discuss radio control eflight > R/C Electric Power - Batteries, Chargers, ESCs and More > Batteries & Chargers
Register Members List Wattflyer Extras Articles Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Social Groups

Batteries & Chargers Discuss Li-P, Li-Ion, NiMh, Nicad battery technology and the chargers that juice 'em up!

Thank you for your support (hide ads)
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-30-2012, 06:51 PM   #51
cyclops2
Super Contributor
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,955
Thanked 43 Times in 41 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Go to page # 1 of this thread.

Then down to post # 13.

Click on his name in the left side.

Select send PM when on his page.

Rich
cyclops2 is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2012, 07:10 PM   #52
cyclops2
Super Contributor
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,955
Thanked 43 Times in 41 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Go to..... Company Support Forum....

Then to ...FMA
Then to the.... saddle pack problem.....

You will see that all of FMA pitches in to help you on a problem.

Rich
cyclops2 is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2012, 09:18 PM   #53
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by MikeCr View Post
Unfortunately no porch. More packs are good and I am leaning towards the FMA charger. I haven't had tome to run through the data. What is the difference between the PowerLAb 6 and 8?


Mike
The Powerlab 6 and 8 are both good chargers. Club members are using both units. If memory is correct, the '8 charger can handle more watts into your LiPo battery than the '6 charger can. Something you might need if you get into giant scale models.

I've got the '8 charger, and am using it to charge a 6S4P A123 battery pack at 30 amps. The '8 charger handles this with out effort.

Note that the '8 charger only charges one pack at a time though. To charge more packs, they must be placed in parallel, something covered in the '8 charger manual.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 02:28 PM   #54
PlaneCraz3d
Formerly Maddux99
 
PlaneCraz3d's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Calvert City, Ky
Posts: 109
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Club: Paducah AeroModelers Club
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

Denny, I see your using a PowerLab8 to charge your field batteries. I have a PowerLab6 and absolutely love it. I did a lot of research before buying this as I couldn't decide between icharger or this one. Anyway, I learned from Tim Marks over on RCG (I think), that the lead acid charge routine in the Powerlab has basically three steps. A higher amp bulk charge to around 12 volts, then lowered to around 2 amps until 13-14 volts, then goes into a finish cycle that is supposed to desulfate the battery. So if this is true then you already have desulfator on hand.

Note: My advice is to be taken with a grain of salt as I am no expert by any means, this is my understanding of a powerlabs lead acid charge routine though.

Current Planes: 3dhs 59" AJ Slick, Mojo 40 Profile
PlaneCraz3d is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2013, 03:39 AM   #55
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by PlaneCraz3d View Post
Denny, I see your using a PowerLab8 to charge your field batteries. I have a PowerLab6 and absolutely love it. I did a lot of research before buying this as I couldn't decide between icharger or this one. Anyway, I learned from Tim Marks over on RCG (I think), that the lead acid charge routine in the Powerlab has basically three steps. A higher amp bulk charge to around 12 volts, then lowered to around 2 amps until 13-14 volts, then goes into a finish cycle that is supposed to desulfate the battery. So if this is true then you already have desulfator on hand.

Note: My advice is to be taken with a grain of salt as I am no expert by any means, this is my understanding of a powerlabs lead acid charge routine though.
Yeah, I've looked up desulfators on the internet, seems they may have questionable value. Those giant electric power substation lead acid batteries are put through whats called an "equalization charge" every so often. I've even tried doing that to my various lead acid batteries. Didn't do much good. One source even suggested boosting the battery voltage to 18 Volts DC on a charger. Tried that, no success.

I've got one of those glass hydrometers that shows the level of battery charge by testing the battery acid. It shows "good" on a new battery. But after a 1/2 year or so of treatment with the high powered Cellpro chargers, those lead acid batteries never get much over "Dead" on the hydrometer, even after a full charge cycle.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2013, 01:09 PM   #56
quorneng
Super Contributor
 
quorneng's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cheshire, UK
Posts: 1,194
Thanked 36 Times in 35 Posts
Club: A lone flyer!
Awards Showcase

Scratchbuilders Award 
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (7)
Default

kyleservicetech
In my days of full size gliding there were always lots of small 12V lead acid batteries (they powered the instruments) being discarded for holding little charge. As you say the hydrometer always indicated 'dead'.
As these batteries were considered scrap what I did as an experiment was fully charge and then replace with fresh battery acid. Lo and behold! The battery capacity was significantly (well over 50%) restored after a few charge/discharge cycles.
Of course it was still an 'old' battery and were never used in the air but I used them for test purposes for many more years.
quorneng is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 02:20 PM   #57
Turner
Super Contributor
 
Turner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 1,325
Thanked 124 Times in 122 Posts
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (3)
Default

This may be off topic but with people using multiple batteries to power chargers I thought it was pertinent.

Searching for some flexible wire to make up some small jumper cables suitable for motorcycles and lawn tractors I found a product called Radaflex twin cable in 6 AWG. It's a twin lead wire with black and red covering. Better yet I found a place that sells it for $1.98 a foot with no minimum.

http://www.cableyard.com/RADAFLEX-6-...able_p_17.html
Turner is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:37 PM   #58
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by Turner View Post
This may be off topic but with people using multiple batteries to power chargers I thought it was pertinent.

Searching for some flexible wire to make up some small jumper cables suitable for motorcycles and lawn tractors I found a product called Radaflex twin cable in 6 AWG. It's a twin lead wire with black and red covering. Better yet I found a place that sells it for $1.98 a foot with no minimum.

http://www.cableyard.com/RADAFLEX-6-...able_p_17.html

Another place to check out is one of those welding supply houses. They sell very flexible heavy gauge wire for reasonable prices.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 11:30 PM   #59
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

I didn't see this mentioned in the thread, so I'll throw it out there. Cheap diesel gensets are now becoming readily available from china. These can be run on a variety of fuels including Biodiesel(love the stuff in my Diesel Mercedes), waste vegi oil, syndiesel, kerosene etc. This would limit the polution factor, as well as being a very efficient source of power. A typical diesel is at least 30% more efficient than gas, reguardless of fuel choice. And being able to run virtually ANY thin oil is indeed neat. In an emergency, I even ran my 300SD Merc on a gallon of motor oil, when I ran out of fuel no where near a station that sold diesel. If I was in the market for a small generator, that is the direction I would shoot for.
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 12:32 AM   #60
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by LowThudd View Post
These can be run on a variety of fuels including Biodiesel(love the stuff in my Diesel Mercedes), waste vegi oil, syndiesel, kerosene etc. This would limit the polution factor, as well as being a very efficient source of power. A typical diesel is at least 30% more efficient than gas, reguardless of fuel choice. And being able to run virtually ANY thin oil is indeed neat. In an emergency, I even ran my 300SD Merc on a gallon of motor oil, when I ran out of fuel no where near a station that sold diesel. If I was in the market for a small generator, that is the direction I would shoot for.
Being raised on a farm many many years ago, my dad had an Oliver 88 diesel tractor, first diesel tractor in the neighborhood. When our neighbors found out about the 88's diesel engine's fuel economy, especially under light loads, a lot of them followed suit.

Problem is, after two years of running, that 88 got very hard to start. I drove it into town for a check over. The diesel mechanic asked "What were you running in this thing? Tractor Fuel?" (Back then tractor fuel was a low grade of gasoline for farm use. Diesel fuel was 17 cents a gallon, tractor fuel a few cents cheaper.)

Of course we were running tractor fuel, and it cost $600 to fix the fuel injectors. Back in 1957, $600 was a LOT of money.

Back to the present days, last summer our RC club started running jet fuel in our diesel powered lawnmower. I warned them about the lack of injector lubrication in jet fuel. Turns out you can buy a special oil for this purpose to mix with various fuels. Jet fuel has noticeably less horsepower than regular diesel fuel with our lawnmower.

So far, so good.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 12:38 AM   #61
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

Biodiesel has higher lubricity than standard diesel fuel. Syndiesel is even better(but pricey), and can be ordered through the standard mail as it has a very high flash point. These days, tractor fuel, or off highway diesel(red dye) is as good or better than what is in the highway fuel pumps. I have heard of people running jet av fuel mixed with tranny fluid to up the lubricity, in fact a few good mechanics I knew were doing this.
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 12:44 AM   #62
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

FWIW, in my Merc. running Biodiesel makes the injecters nearly silent, and the power an smoothness is noticably better. 30 year old 5 cyl turbo diesel, 130k miles. Runs great. Gotta love the old diesel mercs. The motors run anywhere from 500k to a million miles without needing a rebuild. No one makes cars like that anymore. lol
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 02:02 AM   #63
CHELLIE
Super Contributor
 
CHELLIE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Hesperia, So. Calif
Posts: 18,213
View CHELLIE's Gallery13
Thanked 2,109 Times in 2,019 Posts
Club: Chino Renegades RC Flying Club
Awards Showcase

Scratchbuilders Award  Scratchbuilders Award  Ambassador Award  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (4)
Friends: (305)
Default

Originally Posted by LowThudd View Post
Biodiesel has higher lubricity than standard diesel fuel. Syndiesel is even better(but pricey), and can be ordered through the standard mail as it has a very high flash point. These days, tractor fuel, or off highway diesel(red dye) is as good or better than what is in the highway fuel pumps. I have heard of people running jet av fuel mixed with tranny fluid to up the lubricity, in fact a few good mechanics I knew were doing this.
Incase of a melt down, you have a gas station on just about every power pole that has a transformer, shoot a hole in the transformer, get a long wood pole, funnel and garden hose, about 15 gallons of mineral oil in each transformer LOL, Denny is going to love this one make sure the power is Turned Off

I may be getting Older, But I Refuse to grow Up I am Having to much Fun to Grow Up LOL
CHELLIE is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 02:12 AM   #64
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

Originally Posted by CHELLIE View Post
Incase of a melt down, you have a gas station on just about every power pole that has a transformer, shoot a hole in the transformer, get a long wood pole, funnel and garden hose, about 15 gallons of mineral oil in each transformer LOL, Denny is going to love this one make sure the power is Turned Off
The real fun begins when a bad voltage regulator causes all the glow plugs to burn out, and the only way to get the engine started is to use the engine block heater while pouring boiling water over the injection pump and injectors for about 15 min. lol
According to the owners manual, my car can be started in winter without a battery charge if you get the car moving at @30mph then drop it in low speed. Haven't tried that one yet.
I have run it on veggie oil a couple of times in a pinch. In a worst case senario in the middle of no where, I guess one could attatch the injection pump to the crank case. There is two gallons of motor oil in there= 50 miles or so, or whenever the bearings seize. lol
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 02:46 AM   #65
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by CHELLIE View Post
Incase of a melt down, you have a gas station on just about every power pole that has a transformer, shoot a hole in the transformer, get a long wood pole, funnel and garden hose, about 15 gallons of mineral oil in each transformer LOL, Denny is going to love this one make sure the power is Turned Off
Yup
Some of our circuit breakers used that transformer oil for insulation. And every so often we'd get one back where some deer hunter used it for target practice. Those tanks have rather thick walls on them, and it takes a 30-06 or similar to punch a hole in them.

After the insulating oil leaks out, the utility has a real mess on their hands. First, the thing is going to blow after the oil is gone. I've seen those 1/8 inch thick walls on those tanks rip open like it was hit with a giant can opener. And the 38KV flash over can be seen for miles. You'd better believe when we get one of these back, we'd look for bullet holes, because of liability concerns. We had one come back where the backup circuit breaker failed to clear the faulted breaker that lost its oil. We got that 1600 pound circuit breaker back as a bunch of melted aluminum/steel/copper puddles inside of a 55 gallon barrel. It even melted the ceramic portions of the vacuum contact interrupters. And the customer wanted to know why it failed.

Second, the utility has some 50 gallons or more of oil (Sometimes a lot more) soaking into the ground. And, that has to be completely dug up and completely cleaned up.

We designed our NOVA circuit breakers for this reason. (NOVA = No Oil with VAcuum contacts.)

For what it's worth, transformer oil has no lubrication qualities what so ever. I don't know if transformer oil would even run in a diesel engine. That stuff has a pretty high flash point.

(Moderators, I know this is getting way off of topic!!!)

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 02:59 AM   #66
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

Heavy weight motor oil ran in my Merc. Didn't run great, and smoked pretty bad, but it kept me going down the road until I filled it up with diesel. I wouldn't recommend running anything in a diesel that isn't tried and true, unless it is absolutely necessary.

Running waste veggie oil was all the rage in NorCal(the hippies loved it), until San Fransisco decided it would require all waste veggie oil to be converted to biodiesel for the cities fleet vehicles.
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 03:53 AM   #67
CHELLIE
Super Contributor
 
CHELLIE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Hesperia, So. Calif
Posts: 18,213
View CHELLIE's Gallery13
Thanked 2,109 Times in 2,019 Posts
Club: Chino Renegades RC Flying Club
Awards Showcase

Scratchbuilders Award  Scratchbuilders Award  Ambassador Award  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (4)
Friends: (305)
Default

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_transf...tue_diesel_oil

Can transformer oil substitue diesel oil?



In:Ford F-250, Ford F-350 [Edit categories]


Ford Questions






Best Answer

Hi

Yes I have been running about four Ford LDV's On transformer oil for about three years now. No problem. The only problem is to get enough at a reasonable price and then to purefy the oil to acceptable levels. I bought my own purefication plant and uses about 1500liters of tranformer oil to run vehicles. for business use. We travel a lot.

I may be getting Older, But I Refuse to grow Up I am Having to much Fun to Grow Up LOL
CHELLIE is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 04:23 AM   #68
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

I'll have to remember that the next time the Appocalypse happens. lol
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 07:34 PM   #69
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by CHELLIE View Post
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_transf...tue_diesel_oil

Can transformer oil substitue diesel oil?







Best Answer

Hi

Yes I have been running about four Ford LDV's On transformer oil for about three years now. No problem. The only problem is to get enough at a reasonable price and then to purefy the oil to acceptable levels. I bought my own purefication plant and uses about 1500liters of tranformer oil to run vehicles. for business use. We travel a lot.
Transformer oil is good for use in transformers for many years. What breaks down that oil is contamination with water, and sometimes some other unknown stuff. We routinely tested that oil in customer return units with an oil sample tester that subjected the oil to 75 KV, and watch for excessive current leakage through the oil.

A lot of transformer and circuit breaker repair shops do filter that oil, and re-use it. Our company never did do that. Just to much risk because of liability issues. (If you ever saw a circuit breaker explode, you'd know why!) For what its worth, we had six 50,000 gallon tanks of oil in the plant for new production.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 07:49 PM   #70
Turner
Super Contributor
 
Turner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 1,325
Thanked 124 Times in 122 Posts
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (3)
Default

Isn't that oil toxic. Maybe things have changed but that stuff used to be very dangerous to human health if i'm recalling correctly.
Turner is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 08:59 PM   #71
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by Turner View Post
Isn't that oil toxic. Maybe things have changed but that stuff used to be very dangerous to human health if i'm recalling correctly.
Yeah, it used to be years ago. They used PCB's in it. Nowdays, everything that comes into our repair center is 100% tested for PCB's in the oil. If it has over a few parts per billion, we don't work on it, and return it as is.

With PCB's the customer is pretty much stuck with it.

The company I worked for came up with an insulating oil based on soy beans. It works very well, and in a bind, you can safely cook your turkey in it.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 09:24 PM   #72
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
Yeah, it used to be years ago. They used PCB's in it. Nowdays, everything that comes into our repair center is 100% tested for PCB's in the oil. If it has over a few parts per billion, we don't work on it, and return it as is.

With PCB's the customer is pretty much stuck with it.

The company I worked for came up with an insulating oil based on soy beans. It works very well, and in a bind, you can safely cook your turkey in it.
If it is soy ester based, it may be similar to biodiesel. The transestrifacation of soybean oil separates the glycerin from the oil, leaving methyl-esters. Interesting enough, the process is very similar to making soap.

PCBs are nasty. Years ago, even toxic waste round ups would not take the stuff because it was illegal to transport it. Now days, they'll take anything just to keep it out of the landfills.
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 11:26 PM   #73
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 7,861
Thanked 669 Times in 652 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by LowThudd View Post
If it is soy ester based, it may be similar to biodiesel. The transestrifacation of soybean oil separates the glycerin from the oil, leaving methyl-esters. Interesting enough, the process is very similar to making soap.

PCBs are nasty. Years ago, even toxic waste round ups would not take the stuff because it was illegal to transport it. Now days, they'll take anything just to keep it out of the landfills.
Good question. The companies research center scientists created this new oil with one very good benefit. It is much harder to ignite in a disaster. Something pretty important when dealing with very high voltage equipment failures.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 09:46 AM   #74
solentlife
Super Contributor
 
solentlife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ex UK Brit now in Latvia west coast - Ventspils
Posts: 5,855
View solentlife's Gallery47
Thanked 225 Times in 222 Posts
Club: Founder Member Ventspils RC Club. Ex Waltham Chase and Meon Valley Soaring.
Awards Showcase

Scratchbuilders Award  Scratchbuilders Award  Outstanding Contributor Award  125mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (15)
Default

Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer View Post
That's very interesting. I did know that pulling higher currents diminished the Ah capacity available (in any battery) but i didn't know the effect was quite so marked on lead acids. This will tend to drive battery selection to massive size batteries that are very unwieldy to transport and handle, and also pretty expensive.

Maybe carrying a few extra flight batteries to reduce field charging requirements is suddenly a more attractive option?

Steve
This is one of the reasons I gave up posting on similar threads after reading replies basically telling me I knew nought about it !

I have 4 boats and all this is old hat to anyone with a boat and sails seriously. We rely on our batterys to power everything from the navigation lights to radios, start the diesel, diesel fired heating ... the list goes on and on ... building up into a high ampage reqt.

I agree that Puekerts Law is valid and surprises many - but what I amd many opther boaters I know consider is that USEFUL capacity reduces .. the actual capacity of the battery doesn't suddenly dissapear ... If not pushed too hard ... the battery recovers somewhat and can then supply again but it would then be advisable to greatly reduce demand. Bit like that winters dayu when car wouldn't start ... battery gives out ... you go back to car 10mins later and battery turns it over again.

Deep Cycle can be discharged lower than a standard traction battery BUT cannot take HIGH demand current - it damages plates. But even that deeper discharge is NOT as great an increase amount as some think compared to traction batts ...

I shall wander of now ... before getting into trouble with experts !!

Nigel

222kph PKJ,EDF Concorde, Mini4,Mig3,T45,PKJ twin,ME109,Edge540,Cessna182,Skymaster Biplane,F15,F16,Badius,Ultimate,SE5,Qbee10,450 Heli,V911,J3 Cub Founder 9x forum: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Flysky_RC_radio/
- Subscribe my Youtube: "solentlifeuk"
solentlife is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 09:53 AM   #75
solentlife
Super Contributor
 
solentlife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ex UK Brit now in Latvia west coast - Ventspils
Posts: 5,855
View solentlife's Gallery47
Thanked 225 Times in 222 Posts
Club: Founder Member Ventspils RC Club. Ex Waltham Chase and Meon Valley Soaring.
Awards Showcase

Scratchbuilders Award  Scratchbuilders Award  Outstanding Contributor Award  125mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (15)
Default

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
Hi Walt
Do you have any records or data on that "very low amp draw"? Might be useful for the other wattflyer readers.
Watch out guys ... there are people on here and RCG that say it's tosh and DC will provide starting for heavy diesels etc.

DC batterys are designed to power leisure gear in trailers, boats, camping ... NOT for high ampage starter duty etc.

They have thick soft plates and do not have the surface area of traction batts with lots of thin HARD plates.

There are compromise battts - which can start engines and can survive deeper discharge - but they are a compromise. Unfortunately many sellers do NOT distuinguish between them and buyers get fooled ...

The best battery for heavy duty - are truck batterys built to not only start the big diesel engines but also to power the hydraulic tail-lifts.

(I've been suffering Lead Acid batterys all my life on boats ... tried all the different types ... )

Nigel

222kph PKJ,EDF Concorde, Mini4,Mig3,T45,PKJ twin,ME109,Edge540,Cessna182,Skymaster Biplane,F15,F16,Badius,Ultimate,SE5,Qbee10,450 Heli,V911,J3 Cub Founder 9x forum: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Flysky_RC_radio/
- Subscribe my Youtube: "solentlifeuk"
solentlife is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Reply

  WattFlyer RC Electric Flight Forums - Discuss radio control eflight > R/C Electric Power - Batteries, Chargers, ESCs and More > Batteries & Chargers

« Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
100+ MPH Club CHELLIE Hi-Performance and Sailplanes 1947 06-21-2014 11:36 PM
Castle Creations / A123 Battery Backup system kyleservicetech RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros 6 04-17-2012 03:55 PM
Voltage regulator for LiFe RX battery? Henry111 Power Systems 21 10-09-2011 08:09 AM
LiFe vs Nih Receiver battery tests kyleservicetech RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros 23 07-08-2011 02:40 AM
FMA Cellpro PowerLab 8 regenerative discharge power source? miernik FMA Direct 3 04-15-2011 07:15 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:21 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2005 WattfFlyer.com
RCU Eflight HQ

Charities we support Select: Yorkie Rescue  ::  Crohn's & Colitis Foundation



Page generated in 0.61235 seconds with 71 queries