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Old 04-03-2007, 04:14 AM   #76
Bill G
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Originally Posted by pd1 View Post
Bill, You're right about sealing the roof hatch.

Transitioning from displacement taxiing to getting on the step, a lot of spray can go up.

That's why a lot of the Sea Bees had larger spray rails added.
Even with the wide spray rails water can shoot up over the wing.

After all this fine effort we wouldn't want to see the equipment get wet.

How are you going to mount the tip floats?
What are you going to make them out of?
The flight videos I previously posted of a Seabee from modified RCM plans show quite a bit of spray. The model is the same size as my build. Looks like it takes a good bit of both power and time to take off also. As for sealing, I'm trying to build this so that it can be darn near submerged without leakage. I don't want a single drop in there.

I've been thinking about the float tips. One thought is to make them from molded half parts, like the Guillows pilots and bombs, except using fiberglass. The full size floats are made this way, with a seam in the center. The easy way would be to sculpt them from balsa and waterproof them with a coating, but this thing is getting heavy enough as it is.
Haven't thought about the mounting convention yet. I'd like to mount them with a flexible/spring setup that can give way, if needed, versus breaking off. Other thought would be to hinge them and make the support strut with something like an EZ link on one end, so they could be folded against the wing, for transporting. I'll be thinking about the floats for a while. Too many options.

Bill
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Old 04-04-2007, 07:40 AM   #77
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The first pic shows the wing saddle parts and dihedral braces, with the notched wing core standing up in the background. The foam wing core is tough to visualize in the pic, since its on a white table. The dihedral braces will be glued to the wing saddle plate. The braces aren't really necessary since the plane will have wing struts, but will stiffen it a bit, increase the adhesion area of the wing saddle plate when epoxied onto the foam core, and make the wing a stronger when removed from the plane. These ply parts were all lightned with holes, which I've tried to do with any parts I can. The fuse mounted plate has light balsa inserts glued into cutouts in the part, for weight savings, and all parts were coated for waterproofing when finished. The locator pins are mounted in the cabin wing saddle plate, since the wing seal will be on the wing bottom surface, and water could leak in around the pins, if the convention was reversed. They are mounted low enough on the saddle plate to not interfere with the removable roof, which will be made soon. I didn't want to mount the front wing seal between the mounting plates, since it would create a gap in the roofline, detracting from appearance. A continuous seal on 1 single surface will work better too. The wing saddle locating plates will also serve as formers for the curved roof.

The second pic shows the wing sitting on its mount, and the locating pins on the cabin. The pins were difficult to locate, since both the wing bottom sheeting (not yet installed) and the compressed seal thickness had to be simulated with a sheet of balsa used as a shim, while locating the holes.

There will be some type of removable hold down bolt/s in the rear of the wing mounted under the engine cover. One method is to use 2 bolts mounted a bit forward of the rear cabin "V" point, and on the sides to make the bolts accessible, since the prop shaft will make the center area inaccessible. This will be needed, unless there is enough clearance to get in there with a wrench. More issues.

The last pic shows the taillights with removable 12V bulbs in the rudder. The wings will have red and green tip lights also.

Bill


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Old 04-04-2007, 01:25 PM   #78
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Hi Bill, I used to fly a lot of R/C seaplanes before, one trick we used to help keep water out of the cabin was to cover the fuselage opening with scrap Monocote.
If we had to access the inside we just cut it away, then replaced it.

If you have to have continual access to the interior, maybe you can tape some Saran Wrap over the opening. It won't stop a flood, but it should help stop spray from entering.
Paul
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Old 04-04-2007, 05:54 PM   #79
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Originally Posted by pd1 View Post
Hi Bill, I used to fly a lot of R/C seaplanes before, one trick we used to help keep water out of the cabin was to cover the fuselage opening with scrap Monocote.
If we had to access the inside we just cut it away, then replaced it.

If you have to have continual access to the interior, maybe you can tape some Saran Wrap over the opening. It won't stop a flood, but it should help stop spray from entering.
Paul
The removable roof will have a seal, since it will have to be removed every flight for the battery. It will be the same scheme as the wing seal, being a compression seal on the flat flange on the top of the cabin. This plane will be submergeable when finished. The wires for the rudder lights will be sealed at the exit point of the fuse. The tailwheel is sealed with fuel tubing stretched over the torque rod sleeve at the exit, where the inner rod can rotate inside the tubing, but with a water tight fit. The same thing will be done with the main pivot rod for the front wheels. I even tested the pushrod fit, and with 2 inches minumum of sleeving at points that exit the fuse, the surface tension is enough to keep water from leaking past the pushrod inside the tubing. This is unless it would be under a depth deep enough to create significant water pressure, but then again, considering the air volume inside the plane, it would be like trying to sink a beachball. I'm building it like a submarine.

The good thing about building yourself is that you can design sealing, and other features, that you would not get with a Great Planes ARF. On the other hand, it builds a lot slower too.

Bill
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Old 04-05-2007, 05:24 AM   #80
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Made the attachment plates for the wing struts and float mounts, which need to be epoxied in place before sheeting. The foamcore surface has been recessed for these plates, to create a continuous sheeting surface. I used aileron clevis parts for the wing strut mounts, which are secured with epoxy underneath the mounting plates. The mounting tabs for the wing floats are made using Klett aileron horns. This is the first EPP wing core I've used, and I'm quite impressed with how well parts can be both epoxied and CA'd to the foam. Much better than cheap bead foam where the parts rip out. The wingtip lights are now wired, also with a landing light on the left wing outer leading edge. Still need to route the aileron cables before sheeting.

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Old 04-06-2007, 05:48 PM   #81
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Finished hinging the ailerons and tail feathers. The ailerons had a large flat hinge surface, so I added and shaped 1/16" sheet balsa to the hinge face on the ailerons, and rounded it (first 2 pics). The mating face on the wing was dished out to mate with this rounded face, by adding strips of sheet balsa to the top and bottom of the hinge face, and dishing the area out with sandpaper. The ailerons can now move a reasonable distance up and down, without a large gap.

Slotting the tail surfaces for hinges was easy. Usually, you have to be careful to hold the frames while slotting to not crush them, with light non/sheeted, stringered frames. These frames have so many stringers (which will simulate the metal sheet ribbing when covered), that the slotting tool could easily be pushed through the frames, with the frames standing vertically on the table.

The wing landing light can be seen in the third pic. The tinted plastic light cover was made by scuffing with fine paper and rubbing with pastel (grease pencil) to tint the plastic. The full size plane I am replicating has a tinted cover, and it also hides the imperfections in the aluminum light dish in the wing, made by working aluminized duct tape into the light recess area. The outside perimeter of the light cover will be neatly trimmed over with the iron-on covering, which will be applied last, over the plastic lens cover perimeter. This landing light can be seen in the last picture, on the full size plane.

At the rate that all these little details move along, I'd say this thread will be easily going for at least another month or 2.

Bill


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Old 04-06-2007, 06:28 PM   #82
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Awsome job Bill!!!!! I want to build me some planes to fly off my small lake! Where did you find that pic of a real seaplane? Take care and I hope you win that contest . Scott.
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Old 04-07-2007, 07:18 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by ElectricFlyGuy View Post
Awsome job Bill!!!!! I want to build me some planes to fly off my small lake! Where did you find that pic of a real seaplane? Take care and I hope you win that contest . Scott.
Thanks E-FlyGuy
Airliners.net and some other sites have some interesting info. I was surprised, that there are a few dedicated non-profit Seabee sites and owner society sites, that are simply incredible, with a wealth of info and pics. The one I'm replicating is actually in several sites, and the owner seems to be a regular at Fun-in-Sun fly-ins also.
http://www.republicseabee.com/
http://www.seabee.info/seabee.htm

Seabee Progress
Well the picture's crap, but I installed the aileron cables, and am now ready to finish sheeting the wing. I teetered between either using individual servos, or a single servo with Sullivan Gold cables, for a while. The E-Z links used on the aileron horns are HobbyZone thumbwheel threaded links. I've been using them for a while now. They are fine threaded, unlike the Dubro E-Z link screw threads, so you can get incredible tightening force on the pushrod with just your fingers turning the ribbed thumbwheel. Fine threads don't back off as easily as coarse threads do either. I'm convinced that they will tighten as well by hand, as the screw versions do when using a screwdriver. They also seem to be made of high grade steel, and are only a buck for 2 of them. You can tighten the crap out of them, and the threaded thumbwheel screw will not break. They are much easier to adjust with your fingers, than needing a screwdriver for the Dubro links.

The second pic is about as much as its looked like a Seabee as of yet. Every now and then, I have to throw it all together to see a real airplane instead of a bunch of parts, to keep motivated.

Bill


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Old 04-07-2007, 09:45 PM   #84
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Hi Bill,

It's looking fantastic. It's the best, most scale looking Seabee I have seen yet. It looks to me like you're still making good progress.

Chris.
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Old 04-08-2007, 05:59 AM   #85
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Thanks Chris. Making good progress, but slow. Everything's different than other planes I've built. Today's work is about as good as an example as it gets, as I've never mounted a motor on the top rear of a high winger, with a cabin that comes to a point underneath.

I was about to start sheeting the wing today, and I thought it might not be a good idea to mount 300W of takeoff power on foam. Anyways, I had to take a step back once again, and design the motor mount and decide on the wing hold down location. Its a lot easier to build the mounting structure into the wing core now, than to cut into it after sheeting.

I started by adding a hard balsa brace of rectangular stock from the wing leading edge to trailing edge mounting plates, which was shaped to blend with the airfoil. This piece runs down the top center of the wing chord, and will also give a point for the sheeting to fasten to, in the center. I also extended the ply plate on the top rear of the wing, which is glued over the brace just described. I need the added area for the wing hold down bolts, since I don't want the bolt to be trapped under the motor. Originally I wanted a single bolt in the rear, but the motor would have to be removed to access it, so I'm going with 2 bolts, 1 on each side, about 1-1/2" forward of the trailing edge. I'll attach blind fasteners to the top cabin flange on the inside face, for the wing hold down bolts to thread into, with a cross-brace across the underside of the flanges for strength.

I found some light aluminum computer brackets with threaded PEM fasteners already installed in them, in my hardware drawers. Scratch builders collect junk like this with a passion. I bent them for the motor mount brackets as seen in the pic, and are obviously not finished. They will need to be mounted on a shim block, which will lift the motor to the correct height, and downthrust angle.

Bill


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Old 04-09-2007, 05:47 AM   #86
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Well its not exactly a laser light setup, but I made a crude tool to adjust the motor mount block to produce 3 degrees of downthrust, like the full size plane. Still better than that TLAR stuff. The custom made motor mount has 4 threaded inserts in the aluminum frame, that will accept screws installed from the wing bottom surface. The foam wing core has been reinforced with hard balsa and ply in the motor mounting area and also has a brace that runs though the center chord, to tie the front and rear mounting plates of the wing together.

The wing mounting holes, tubing liners that are glued inside the holes, and the placement of the threaded inserts in the cabin top flange were located with a high degree of accuracy. This is the kind of stuff that makes these scratch builds take forever. If you don't try to work within a tolerance of +/-.010", then you will end up with a wing saddle plate that does not butt perfectly with the cabin, and bolts that require game playing to get the threads started. The 10-32 nylon wing bolts drop into the tubing inserts and thread effortlessly. When fully tightened, the unthreaded bolt shank at the top fits inside the tubing with only a few thousandths clearance, for a precision fit. The tubing inserts are located inside ply plates which are attached to the wing center balsa framer, since they would rip through the soft foam core, without this positive support.

The top wing sheeting panels have been pre-cut to fit like a glove, so I pre-drilled the motor mount and wing hold-down holes in them, so I won't have to find them later, since they would have been buried under the sheeting.

Custom Gearbox City
The gearbox came with my Great Planes foam ARF Hellcat. I used a different drive gear, and have a final ratio of about 3.1:1. I drilled out the gear and machined a small half-round on the inside surface of the inner gear hole. Using the correct size of wire to make a keyway, it can be pressed in-between the flat on the motor shaft, and this half-round hole, which locks the gear on the motor shaft. It is tight and works well. My only concern is that there is not that much meat left in the gear body after the machining, so I hope it doesn't explode under power, but it is working well. Stop collars were used on either side of the gear, to stop it from sliding on the shaft. Opposing the set screws of these 2 stop collars 180 degrees apart keeps them in balance on the motor shaft.

If you get a kick out of this gearbox, you outta see what's in the Hellcat now.
It has an LPS gearbox, which suffered some melting damage in a Feigao meltdown, with a 180 brushed motor now custom mounted on it with wire tie and globs of CA. Has many great flights (over 30) on it, using 3s lipo to boot!

The Motor
I'm not betting the farm on the motor, but it is a Maxx 4011 cobalt. I've been trying to hide this motor from the thread, since I know that it will be questioned skeptically and will cause a million "go brushless" comments. I may end up doing that anyways. They are good for about 250W on 3s lipo, and can peak at 300W for takeoff. Theoretically, I can run at about 9500rpm with a Master Airscrew 9070 3-blader, using my 3.1:1 gear ratio on 3s lipo.

Moto Calc Anyone?
While some of the motor calc software is a bit conservative, I'd be interested to see the results of the setup, if anyone wants to run it?

Why use it? Because I have it. Also, by using a geared setup, the motor is moved forward, which helps avoid the need for added noseweight. If I use an outrunner, then the motor will either fit in the very rearmost part of the engine cover area, or will require a driveshaft extension with a carrier bearing.

note: engine cover: full size plane. Don't correct me, and say motor now.

Bill


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Old 04-09-2007, 05:54 AM   #87
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Thumbs up Give this man a REP BOOST please!

Very awsome job Bill!! I gave you Rep boost and hope others that see your fine work here, will also!! I will be watching this thread grow for sure. Awsome job you are doing!!!!! Scott.

Originally Posted by Bill G View Post
Well its not exactly a laser light setup, but I made a crude tool to adjust the motor mount block to produce 3 degrees of downthrust, like the full size plane. Still better than that TLAR stuff.

The wing mounting holes, tubing liners inside the holes, and the placement of the threaded inserts in the cabin were located with a high degree of accuracy. This is the kind of stuff that makes these scratch builds take forever. If you don't try to work within a tolerance of +/-.010", then you will end of with a wing saddle plate that does not butt perfectly with the cabin, and bolts that require game playing, to get the threads started. These nylon 10-32 wing bolts drop right into the tubing inserts and thread effortlessly. When fully tightened, the bolt shank fits inside the tubing with only a few thousandths clearance, for a precision fit. The tubing inserts are located inside ply plates which are attached to the wing center balsa framer, since they would rip through the soft foam core, without this positive support.

The top wing sheeting panels have been pre-cut to fit like a glove, so I pre-drilled the motor mount and wing hold-down holes in them, so I won't have to find them later, since they would have been buried under the sheeting.



Bill
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Old 04-10-2007, 07:21 AM   #88
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Thanks for the comments EFG.

I fabricated the bottom balsa sheet for the wing, and all of the through holes are cut, so I'm finally about ready to finish this wing. The top sheet has been ready for a few days.

I added some CF strips along the bottom of the foam core, which are glued to the bottom of the motor mount. It had a bit too much flex (meaning basically any), even with the wing center brace, and I wanted to eliminate it. Its much stiffer now. If you torque the motor mount upward at the rear, like the motor will, then you can actually watch the EPP foam core flex a bit, along the line that the CF tape is glued to. These CF strips are long enough to distribute the load very well.

I also realized that there is no need to try to route the wing seal all the way to the very rearmost "V" point of the cabin. I added a piece of ply to the top cabin flange to fill in the rear "V" area, and now the rear wing seal will run across the cabin directly behind the wing mount bolts. The 2 front motor mount screws should not interfere with the seal compression, since they will be recessed in the sheeting, and the foam seal will probably not compress thinner than the remaing protruding screw head. I still may have to grind a hair off of the screw heads to ensure good seal compression. The 2 rear motor mount bolts are not located between the wing and the top cabin flange, so they will not be an issue.

There are also nylon flange bushings glued into the motor mount holes on the bottom of the wing. The flange adds support area so the screws do not pull through the wooden mount in the rear of the foam wing core. I also got a lucky bonus when I realized that the threaded inserts in the rear of my aluminum motor mount bracket are split-lock PEMs. They hold a screw from backing out, like a deformed aircraft nut. The 2 rear motor mount bolts are the ones that I really want to stay in place.

Bill


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Old 04-11-2007, 06:42 AM   #89
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Well it happened at last, I got the wing sheeted.

Sheeting the foam core wing
The fabrication work for the panels was quite a job, since I had to join several sheets of 1/32" balsa, due to the size of the wing panels. I use the painter's tape to first join the seams on the side that will be face-up when sheeted. The CA glue is applied to the other side. Before applying glue to the seams, first rub the seam line with your finger, so that the panel surfaces will be flush on the side that will be exposed after sheeting. Balsa sheets are not always exactly the same thickness.

The first pic shows painter's tape applied to the balsa perimeter frame and the wooden dowel rod on the LE. These areas need to be masked off, since the contact spray reaks havoc on wood, if you intend to CA glue anything to it in the future. Learned this the hard way in the past. After spraying the 3M77 contact spray to the foam wing core, the tape is removed, and the sheeting is carefully applied. Since you basically only get one chance at laying the sheeting, the panels were pre-trimmed to fit perfectly. Looking closely, a temporary dowel locator was added to one of the motor mount bolt holes in the wing, to help locate the sheeting. The cutouts for the wing float mounting tabs were used as locators for the outer part of the sheeting panels, when positioning them. As expected, these cutouts in the sheeting required tweaking to make them into precise locators.

The second pic shows a few stringers added to the wing extension bottom area. The top of the wing ends were sheeted with the grain running in the direction of the chord, so the sheeting used the formers for support in the cross-grain direction. On the wing bottom, there was simply not enough support for 1/32" sheeting without the added stringers, since the sheeting grain runs in the opposite direction.

Last pic: A sheeted wing. Still far from completed. Still needs the aileron servo to be mounted, and the Horner tips with lights, support struts, and floats to be fabricated.

Wing-Cabin Seal
The third pic shows the consistent gap for the foam seal between the top cabin flange and the wing bottom. With the wing located in place on its dowel pins, the gap is perfect. The wing will gently compress the seal as it is slid in place. Too small of a clearance, and the wing will try to push the foam seal out of place, as its being installed. Obviously, the wing will have to be held up at a small angle while sliding it in place on the dowels. Once in place, the rear hold down bolt will apply pressure to the remainder of the sealing area.

Bill


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Old 04-11-2007, 07:03 AM   #90
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Wow Bill, you been busy!!!!!!!!! Awsome job so far. Chat later , Scott
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:18 AM   #91
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Originally Posted by ElectricFlyGuy View Post
Wow Bill, you been busy!!!!!!!!! Awsome job so far. Chat later , Scott
I'm amazed, there's actually people online now. 2 views on the pics already, at this time of night.

Bill
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Old 04-12-2007, 05:25 AM   #92
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More sculpted parts made. Only the roof to go! It's not exactly like it will be done in a week now, but the difficult parts are slowly being knocked out.

The Horner wing tips are basically finished, with a bit of fine sculpting that will be done after gluing them to the wing ends.

I decided to make the floats from a series of laminated sections, that will be sculpted after gluing them together. I found some light 1/4" sheet balsa to cut them from. After cutting out 8 of them, I'd about had enough of them. Still had to make a few more sections from thinner balsa, to make them thick enough. I cut away the center of the inner sections for lightening. The parts weigh a bit less than 1-1/2 oz total, and will be a lot lighter after sculpting.

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Old 04-13-2007, 05:53 AM   #93
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Not much new progress, but still forging ahead on the wing floats. After sanding off most of the excess material to shape the floats, they are now down to less than 1-1/4oz for the pair. To make these parts look scale, it requires finding a number of pictures taken from different angles. They look different in every shot, and confusing the matter more, there appears to be different styles. They will take a while to shape the slightly dished out hulls and get all the contours correct. I thought about molding glass parts from the balsa floats. I could join 2 halves together and leave a small flange seam, which would look just like the center flange seam on the full size floats. May do this later and make an extra set of floats, AFTER this thing is finished.

BTW, the second pic's a real one. I hope mine look that good when done.

Bill


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Old 04-17-2007, 07:41 PM   #94
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Not much new, since I've been away for a few days.
But...they had a hobby shop there! Just a mile away.

I got some aluminum oval struts for the wings, a H9 pilot, and some other stuff for the project. The floats are now mounted on their struts. They will need farings made to blend into the floats and will be rounded at the edges. The struts were made by laminating 3 sections of square stock balsa together, since I didn't have large enough rect stock. I bought a pile of fittings to spread out and stare at, to decide how to attach the struts and floats, which is mostly worked out now.

One thing that worked well, was using laminated layers to make the float bodies. The center of the hull has a lamination layer of CA, which hardens the centerline of the hulls. This makes it much easier to shape the "V" peaks of the hulls and make them sharp, without nicking them or accidentally sanding dings into them.

Still deciding how to finish these floats. May prime-sand-paint, or may glass the wood cores with lightweight cloth. I'm a big iron-on fan, but I'm not going to try to cover the floats with iron-on.

Bill


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Old 04-18-2007, 10:22 PM   #95
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Great work Bill, you're making good progress. It looks very much like a Seabee now.
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Old 04-19-2007, 06:35 AM   #96
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Thanks Chris. I really need to stay motivated on this project now, since it seems like it will be going forever.

I'll try to make this the last wing float post, since they're probably getting old. Getting old on this end too. There's just too many steps to making good looking scale floats that have all the stamping lines/curves of the originals properly replicated. They started with the laminated sheets which were rough carved to shape. They were then rough sanded and fine sanded, and primed.

The first pic shows the floats after the first coat of high build primer. Thin primer would get you nowhere fast. They still look pretty rough. The second pic shows the floats after sanding the first primer coat, and repriming. Much better now. They will still need yet another prime and sand, after this second coat is sanded, and should then be presentable.

I also installed the HS81 aileron servo, stolen from another plane. It was larger than that plane needed anyways, so I replaced it with a lighter one, for an even trade. The servo was basically stuffed into a cutout, and then captured around its perimeter with thin basswood that is glued to the sheeting, which holds it firmly in place. I don't like to epoxy servos into place, in case they need to be removed in the future.

This will be the best cable job I've done to date. After learning the ins and outs of cables, I've found the 2 main rules are: route the cables at 90 deg to the aileron horns, and keep the exposed lengths short. Routing at an angle to the aileron servos makes the ailerons flappy. To keep the exposed lengths short, the trick is to attach the cable to one of the inner holes on the aileron horns, thus requiring short throws at both the ailerons, and the servo. This will minimize the "arc" that the aileron and servo horns will need to travel through, and keep the motion more linear, thus allowing for short exposed cable lengths without bind. When the exposed cable length at the servo is too great, the cable will tend to "s" bend, and will create both slop and poor centering of the ailerons.


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Old 04-20-2007, 06:11 AM   #97
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Made some scale oleo struts today, using plastic tubing and pinpoint hinges. They are not functional, but look better than a piece of bare wire for a strut leg.

The strut piston (center section) will be silver, with the other parts painted to match the plane. The bottom of the struts have wheel collars pressed into them, which are used to mount the wheel axle bolts which lock against a flat on the inner strut leg. The axle bolts are threaded into the collars, after sliding the struts over the inner wire strut leg. All of the strut parts are indexed with flats filed on them, so assembly is easy.

I also made the strut pivot arms using some pieces of plastic square stock, which were glued to pinpoint hinges and then slit down the center, spread open to make 2 separate arms. Triangles were glued inside these arms. They will be glued to the strut covers.

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Old 04-21-2007, 07:10 AM   #98
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Finished my gear struts. All these details were made from simple parts: plastic and alum tubing, nylon shoulder bushings, pinpoint hinges, square plastic stock, wire, and aluminized duct tape. In the background of the second pic, is a cardboard template with a hole cut out, used for painting the wheel hubs. This worked much better than the masking tape I've used in the past, since it will stay on the hum after pushing it over the outer rim.

I may add simulated brake lines, and I loosely hung a piece of wire over the gear struts, just to see what it would look like. In the last pic, I slid pieces of aluminum tubing over the wire, to simulate the attachment clamps and the tubing connector where the brake line will connect to the outer fuse. I'll probably add this detail.

The second pic shows a rubber tubing seal installed over the pivot rod that exits the fuse. It slides over the aluminum tubing housing and seals against the inner rod surface. There is little clearance between the two parts for water to enter in, but I dont want the inner steel shaft to rust, and seize. A simulated seal flange slides over the tubing seal (seen in the foreground), which is made from a nylon shoulder bushing. Black prop spacers were slid over the plastic shafts that inserts into these bushings, to simulate the water seals on the full size plane.

Bill


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Old 04-21-2007, 01:08 PM   #99
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Very Nice Bill. Keep up the good work.

Tom
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Old 04-22-2007, 03:15 AM   #100
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The gear is looking great. I have had problems with centering using single aileron servo and flexible cable. I used two 4.3 gm Blue Arrow aileron servos in my Tritle Cessna 140 with EZ connectors at the aileron horns. Very easy to adjust. Aileron horns are angled forward to give more up than down motion. Haven't tried mixing to get true differential aileron yet.
I like using aileron rudder mix to counter adverse yaw.
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