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Old 04-22-2007, 06:52 AM   #101
Bill G
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Originally Posted by E-Challenged View Post
The gear is looking great. I have had problems with centering using single aileron servo and flexible cable. I used two 4.3 gm Blue Arrow aileron servos in my Tritle Cessna 140 with EZ connectors at the aileron horns. Very easy to adjust. Aileron horns are angled forward to give more up than down motion. Haven't tried mixing to get true differential aileron yet.
I like using aileron rudder mix to counter adverse yaw.
Thanks for the comments Grasshopper.

E-C, I actually thought about using 2 of my 4.3 Blue Arrow servos that I have laying around, for the ailerons. Its all a trade-off. Individual servos with hard wire linkage are always tighter, but then you have to run the wire harnessing, and they are installed in an exposed portion of the wing, which makes removal more difficult. They could be mounted to be removable, but then again there is the water issue with this plane. The main reason I went with the single center mounted servo is to mount it inside the cabin in an unseen area, away from the water, where it can be removed and reinstalled without having to make it pretty. With my luck, if I set something in stone, it will have to come out again.

This cable setup is the tighest one I've done yet, but there is still the slightest bit of "s" bending in the cable, when moved in either direction from center. I've found the solutions for good centering are to use the inner servo and aileron control horn arm holes for short movement/fast response, and to keep the exposed cable lengths short. Since the servo arm travels through an arc, you have to shoot for a happy medium. Mount the servo such that the E-Z link on the servo arm is aligned with the bottom surface of the wing, where the cable routes along the wing surface. As the servo arm rotates, it will bend the cable a bit, causing some friction at the point where they enter the cable sleve, but at center position the cable will be perfectly in line with the cable sleeves, minimizing flex and bind.

All said, there is still a bit of centering slop, mostly due to control arm flex. The darn E-Z link holes are obviously not in-line with the servo horn, so they torque it. With s-bend linkage rods, or rods with clevises, this problem does not exist, such as with individual servos in the wing panels.

The bottom line is I'm pretty happy with the minimal freeplay/slop in this cable system, but they are fussy and have to be done right. This setup only has a mere 1 inch of free cable on either side of the aileron horn, and I've determined that is about the max unsheathed cable length allowed for a tight setup. Not much leeway in these cable setups. I have a few that were done a while ago in my cable learning process, that are pretty mushy.

Bill
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Old 04-23-2007, 05:46 PM   #102
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Didn't think about servo arm exit /water entry hole in wing. I imagine a piece of ballon rubber tied to servo arm and glued to wing with canopy glue to keep water out. Would probably last a few months before needing replacement. Maybe there are some kind of bellows-like rubber toggle switch covers for marine applications that would work. Model boat item?
http://www.amazon.com/7050-Marine-Bl...47457&sr=1-278
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Old 04-24-2007, 04:56 AM   #103
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Default How to Seal Aileron Servo Wing Slots

I actually found some toggle switch rubber boots that might work. Guys on E-Zone suggested using a piece of condom or a piece of finger out of latex glove. I was even wondering about using a piece of creepy crawly plastic bass fishing worm somehow.
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Old 04-24-2007, 05:41 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by E-Challenged View Post
I actually found some toggle switch rubber boots that might work. Guys on E-Zone suggested using a piece of condom or a piece of finger out of latex glove. I was even wondering about using a piece of creepy crawly plastic bass fishing worm somehow.
I was actually thinking about water getting into the sheeting as well as the servo itself, since the plane has sheeted foam core wings.

I saw some Parkzone aileron linkage wire covers today at the LHS. I was thinking that they could be used to cover a linkage wire, with the aileron servo already sealed well into a wing panel. If you made a slit rubber flap at the opening, kindof like the rubber flaps on the parking brake lever box on a car, it would keep the water out pretty well, although not perfectly. I bought a few that I may use to simulate the the type of lever arms used on a full size Seabee's ailerons. The idea will be to use them to hide the aileron cables where they are exposed at the wing. Won't exactly look like the scale lever arms, but will look more cerrect than the exposed cables will, from a distance. I'll have to see how they look when I get home tomorrow.

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Old 04-25-2007, 08:38 PM   #105
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I finally have this brushed, of all things, power system up to par, if it holds up and doesn't explode.
The gearing was originally 3.1:1, which I pretty much knew would be too steep, since I've used the setup with a 9070 prop with 2.5:1 gearing. I figured that a 9070 3-blader would add sufficient load for the 3.1 ratio to be practical. It didn't, and was not much over 115W on 3s.

I changed to a 1070 3-blade prop, which required the making of an 1/8" shim to lift the motor mount up a bit higher off the wing, for needed prop clearance. Got the power up to 175W, but still probably not enough. The Maxx 4011 cobalt lists the motor at 23.5A using a 6x4 prop with an 8V constant power supply. I wanted the 3s setup to reach the 23.5A figure, with hopeflully more for short takeoff burst.

Next, I got out the Dremel to modify the custom gearbox once again, to accomodate a new drive gear. I found a larger drive gear that was a Parkzone replacement part. It was better than the first gear that I used, since it pressed tightly onto the 1/8" dia motor shaft, and did not need a keyed setup like the first gear did. I thought that the 9070 3-blader would now be useful, with the new 2.1:1 ratio, but it just didn't have the gains I wanted, and was still less than the original gearing with the larger 1070 3-blader prop, so I put the 1070 prop on and re-tested:
Reached 265W on 3s and still not at full throttle! I don't want to destroy this motor, although it is a strong motor, so I stopped there. Should have plenty of power now, for an airplane that may go a few ounces over 4 pounds.

Bill


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Old 04-26-2007, 07:14 AM   #106
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Made the inner linkage for the wing struts. I found some aluminum tube that is perfect for the job. The tubing is reinforced with wooden dowel rod, for strength, and makes a good attachment point for the linkage at the ends of the struts.

The first pic shows the assembly scheme. The pic's a bit flushed, but the top strut end in the pic shows the "exploded" view of the parts. When finished, the strut ends will have farings made over the ends, like the farings in the picture of the full size plane. In the second pic, I filed the ends with a taper, to meet the fuse wall flush when assembled in postion. The linkage hinges are recessed into the aluminum body, so they will not be seen, when the farings are added, and the struts are assembled to the plane.

Also in the background are covering pices cut for the tail feathers. I figured that I better start doing some of the covering, so I don't have to do it all at once, at the end. Still debating on whether I'll cover the fuse, or finish it with a good dope paint system, since it will be a bear to cover.

Bill


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Old 04-27-2007, 05:20 PM   #107
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Finally put a retract servo in this thing. I set the gear up with an intermediate size non-retract servo, since it was what I had. Works much better with a real retract servo. Like everything that you touch on this plane, I spent a good few hours tweaking the installation. I've always used non-retract servos on my smaller plane's retractable gear sets, so this is actually the first retract servo I've ever bought. The slow steady action looks fairly realistic.

Bill


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Old 04-28-2007, 07:25 AM   #108
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Earlier I had metioned that this plane was flown by James Bond, in the Man With the Golden Gun.
Unlike James Bond, I found out today that Sig Sanding Sealer is to be "stirred, and not shaken".
Didn't sand very well, as it was pretty hard, being mostly just butyrate dope. I got a good result after stirring up the solids at the bottom of the bottle, and applying a second coat and then sanding.

Also covered the tail feathers today. The spar construction worked well at simulating the ribbed aluminum skin on the full size Seabee tail feathers (3rd pic). Both white marker lights are lit on the rudder, in the second pic below.

Bill


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Old 04-30-2007, 06:23 AM   #109
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Made the wingtip lights from cutaway sections of a Guillows prop spinner, which worked well for the lens housing shape. I've found the thin Guillows plastic to be quite useful for things like this. The wing Horner tips are now glued on and the lights are working

Finished the float detail. The floats were painted with flat white Dollar Store buck-a-can paint that I had laying around, and then clear coated with Testors clear. Worked well.
The light blue was sprayed from Testors, you guessed it, Light Blue, and the dark blue stripes were applied with decal trim, which adheres quite well to fresh paint. It should stay on just fine in the water.
These floats are really giving me an idea of what this thing might look like, when its finished.

Also in the float pic is the brake lines, which have been attached to the landing gear. The ends will be glued into hole drilled into the fuse, after the fuse is finished.

Discovered Dope and Sanding Sealer is not only for doped finishes:
I've also been impressed with the Sig Sanding Sealer and dope. I should have used these dope products a long time ago. (ok so that didn't quite sound right) I've always been a sheeting fanatic, but I figured that I did not need to use these products, since I use iron-on coverings. The major benefit of the sanding sealer is that it provides a consistent surface for finish sanding. Otherwise, its nearly impossible to get a perfect result when sanding sheeted surfaces, since the balsa, CA seams, and filler is all of different hardnesses. I've killed myself in the past, trying to get these surfaces smooth.
The other benefit besides waterproofing, is that it strengthens the balsa and adds dent resistance. I'll be using these products in the future.

Bill


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Old 05-01-2007, 06:15 AM   #110
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Hi Bill,

It's looking great! Just the finish on the floats is mighty impressive. The rest of it will be truly fantastic. You should enter it in the RCG build off . The Dblum build stopped when you left. No one will have a Seabee as nice as yours , karma maybe?:p
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Old 05-01-2007, 08:24 AM   #111
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Originally Posted by Chris F View Post
Hi Bill,

It's looking great! Just the finish on the floats is mighty impressive. The rest of it will be truly fantastic. You should enter it in the RCG build off . The Dblum build stopped when you left. No one will have a Seabee as nice as yours , karma maybe?:p
Thanks for the comments. Actually the guy who owns the full size Seabee that I am replicating will have a Seabee as nice as mine, but his won't fit in a car.

I would need a plan to compete in the build off.
I thought about designing an ACAD drawing for the plane, but it would probably take months. I used DBlum's 2-view drawing, and drew in the parts by hand with a pencil. Some of the part outlines were in Dave's drawing. I referenced an online build of the Tom Mountjoy plan for ideas. That build was heavily modified, but the boom was still not scale. That said, it would be nice to have a good scale Seabee plan out there, which would be my motivation, if I were to draw up this design.
I have gotten in touch with the builder of the build that I referenced, and he is now working on an impressive glass fuse design:
http://hangaren.pointclark.net/gallery/scale-seabee

If I did design a build plan, it would probably be a clean design since I could tweak the current design, now that I already have built it. My problem is that I like to get right down to building, without spending much time on designing, so my plans are usually enlarged 3-views with a bunch of stuff sketched on them. It would be difficult for me to get motivated to put the CAD time in, to draw up this build.

As far as RCG is concerned, after the nonsense I got there, I will post a completed picture of the plane when it is finished, after I am allowed to log on again in about 2 weeks. I'll show it with the view count from here, and note that it would have been about 10 times that in their RCG Scale Forum. Their loss, I'm happy keeping it here.

New Progress:
I made the interior panels, and will probably start working on a removable floor with seats, which can be removed to service the servos underneath. The plane will have a scale interior, where the only disruption is that some of the battery may be seen if you peer way into the front of the interior. The passenger seat and a small portion of the floor around it will probably be a single removable part, for the battery access. When I get this scale interior completed, the H9 pilot will look stupid, since he has no legs.

Bill
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Old 05-02-2007, 07:24 AM   #112
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The first pic is just a "slap together" assembly of what everything's starting to look like.

Engine Cover
I glassed the engine cover mold, and had to make a decision on what resin to use. I've used USC glass resin before, but I'm an impatient fool who does not like the 12 hour cure time. Also, the glass tends to get bubbles and wrinkles that have to be continuously worked out, so the faster it sets, the better, as you have to pay attention to it during that time.

I thought about thinned epoxy, but haven't experimented with it, to be familiar with it. Then I found this System Three boat epoxy trial kit that dad must have acquired about 20 years ago. It had everything, inculding various fillers. The stuff is an absolutely odorless waterbase system, which was nice to work with.

I didn't want to add multiple layers of Saran wrap, as it inevitably has a few wrinkles, even after stretching, and multiple layers just add more imperfections to the finished glass piece. In the past, I've had pinholes and/or tears that I had not seen, which allowed the USC resin to eat the mold. One time I was very fortunate that the resin had set before it started eating the mold. I got a perfect cowl for a Hellcat, but the mold was half-gone when I removed it. This System Three epoxy does not eat foam.

I started brushing it over the glass, and had a bit of concern with the hardening of "age old" epoxy. I had to filter the resin, since it had some flakes in it, which is a sign of aging epoxy. Some resins will literally turn to 100% hard crystallized junk, after time.

Well my concerns disappeared when the mixing pot cup next to me started smoking.:< I hurried it outside and returned to completing the application. The next step will be a coating of bondo and sanding.

I had wanted to preserve the foam mold, but I'll probably end up hogging it out. Still can always use the glass cowl to make a mold, in the future. Still may be able to work the cowl off of the mold without destroying it. Since the front grille vent will be cut out, I could slit that area, and would only have to reattach the small area of the cowl frame below the vent opening.

Bill


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Old 05-04-2007, 06:58 AM   #113
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The thick primer on the engine cowl was sanded with the cowl still on the mold, and gave a good result and was actually still a complete coat, unlike it is now with it almost all gone.
I ran into a small problem after removing the cowl from the mold, since the epoxy was not stiff enough to hold shape as well as the part required. I added a layer of glass to the inside, but also got a bit of waviness in the outer surface, in the process. The thick scratch filling primer was then almost completely sanded off, which allowed for filling of the worst low areas. Another heavy prime and sand, and it should be ready to paint.
The epoxy used probably would be good for glassing foam wings.

The part fits the wing well, and now has the front and rear openings cutout. I shaped a wire loop for the rear opening, which is CA glued inside the opening to stiffen the area. Also dampened and shaped 1/8" balsa square strip and glued along the bottom flange, to allow for minor shaping for a perfect fit to the wing. This balsa will have to be doped like the rest of the balsa used in the build, for waterproofing.
Also checked to make sure that the motor mount and motor would fit properly, with the cowl installed over the motor. Don't want to find problems here down the road.:<

Bill


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Old 05-06-2007, 06:46 AM   #114
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About time I post agian. I didn't plan on my last "Cubs on Floats" post to stay there that long.

Finished the fiberglass engine cowl, and painted the white basecoat. Will need the light and dark blue striping to be added to complete. The rear bottom lip locks in place under the motor mount when installed in place, so I may simply use a rare earth magnet to lock the front down to the top wing surface. Keep it simple and easily servicable.

The interior side panels are also installed. They were made from dope treated 1/32" balsa sheet, and covered with iron-on covering, which was painted over. The interior will have a false removable floor with seats. The passenger seat and floor section under the seat will be a removable piece, for battery access. I'm even thinking of mounting the lighting switch assembly behind the instrument panel, since it will fit behind it. I'm using a pull rod switch mount, with a ball that is mounted on the pull rod. Should be a nice scale feature to have the pull switch mounted on the instrument panel.

Bill


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Old 05-06-2007, 02:55 PM   #115
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In the first pic, the raised ribs in the sheetmetal below the window line were added, which were made from strips of thin 1/32" balsa sheet. The white spots on them are paint, used to cover the pen markings which would otherwise show through the white covering. The balsa strips were doped to harden them, before gluing them to the plane, so they will hopefully not be crushed/dented by the iron when the covering is applied over them. They will add extra effort to the covering job, but the detail should be worth it.

The second pic shows the basic removable roof framing parts, with the base and the rear former made. Foam seal tape will be applied to the bottom of the base frame, and to the rear former which will seal against the wing saddle plate on the cabin. These are basically the last of the parts that take forever to shape precisely. Woohoo!

I made a list of all the remaining parts and tasks yet to be completed, and it is still a mile long.

Bill


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Old 05-07-2007, 04:45 AM   #116
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Your Seabee is looking great. Your are an innovative designer/craftsman. Hope you make the plans available after sucessful maiden and subsequent flights.

I made a list of things to do on my "build off" P-26 Peashooter with hour estimates for each totalling about 56 hours or two weeks worth of fairly steady work, must maiden before end of month. Bought a larger low KV Scorpion 2215-22 outrunner motor at a model swap meet that will interchange with my AXI 2212/26 if needed, same mounting hole spacing. Saw videos of E-Zoner's Short Sunderland trying to take off, not quite enough urge, hope you have planned for some surplus of power.
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Old 05-07-2007, 08:23 AM   #117
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Originally Posted by E-Challenged View Post
Your Seabee is looking great. Your are an innovative designer/craftsman. Hope you make the plans available after sucessful maiden and subsequent flights.

I made a list of things to do on my "build off" P-26 Peashooter with hour estimates for each totalling about 56 hours or two weeks worth of fairly steady work, must maiden before end of month. Bought a larger low KV Scorpion 2215-22 outrunner motor at a model swap meet that will interchange with my AXI 2212/26 if needed, same mounting hole spacing. Saw videos of E-Zoner's Short Sunderland trying to take off, not quite enough urge, hope you have planned for some surplus of power.
Making plans for this plane would simply be insane. If I ever did document all the individual add-ons that I put onto this plane, versus other more simplistic builds that I've seen, then nobody would ever build the 4 page plan airplane.

The problem with this plane is that there are so many custom carved, sculpted, and fiberglass parts and custom operations, that just can't really be documented on a plan. If a builder has the skill to take on all those tasks, they probably will find scratching the basic plane together from a 3-view, to be the easy part.

What I would reccomend is to take the Mountjoy plan, and stretch the cabin to make it scale. That is what another builder did, with their build of the Mountjoy plan. I followed that build online of the Mountjoy plan, as a basic reference. For the tailboom, I would simply (well maybe) modify the plan's tailboom formers to make them scale, versus the simplified boom of that plan, that just looks wrong. Since my build is the same scale as the Mountjoy plan, I think that a good contribution to future Seabee builds would be for me to make and offer glass floats and engine cowls, using my parts to make molds. As far as I know, I have the only truly scale sculpted floats for the plane at this scale.

There is also a Cleveland plan for this plane, although I know nothing about it. If it is a good plan, I would reccomend starting from there, and adding whatever customizations that the builder desires. Another option is a glass kit that is available. The cost could be very high and still be worth it, when you consider all the work of building this plane's fuse.

I'll have to look at your Peashooter. Still haven't flown mine, and was actually debating it today. Too much sentimental value.:<
Edit: Just looked at it. Looks good, and pretty far along now. Looks like you have a lot of effort into that cowl. Are you going to glass the outside? Also, the Sterling kit I have uses a sheeted structure for the gear pants, and has small molded plastic parts for the wheel covers, which is an easy route. Trust me, I know firsthand how much effort goes into these sculpted balsa parts. Ask me how I know this. I guess If you're making a plan for the contest, you would have to offer the parts, if you put that type of design on the plan.

As for power, I have ran my setup to 265W on 3s, and did not want to push it harder, but could have. I'm hoping to have enough at about a 4-1/2 lb airplane. The planned setup is a 2900kv motor geared 2.1:1 with a 10x7 3-blader. Feels pretty powerful on test, which I've done. A little scary holding the motor and mount in your hand.:< Off top of head, it seems about the same as my AXI 2820 outrunner with the same prop, on a Hellcat.

Seabee progress:
The basic removable roof frame is complete, and will be sheeted over the framing. The opening in the front area is for the skylight window. It will be framed in to support the glass, and the framing is now underway after this pic was taken.
To install, the roof slides under the engine cover, and against the wing saddle bulkhead. The small area of the roof that blends into the wing still needs to be fabbed, and will be part of the wing.

Bill


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Old 05-08-2007, 08:02 AM   #118
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The roof is now sheeted and mostly complete. The first pic shows the balsa sunroof framing added to the front. The glass will be glued along the perimiter, and will be overlapped slightly with the iron-on covering for a clean outline, with the glass blending in with the roof surface.

The sheeted roof in the second pic required a bit of planing on the bottom flange, to create a flat seal surface for the foam seal. Like most parts on this plane, the custom fitting often takes almost as much time as building the part. The fit at the wing and against the engine cowl turned out quite well, after a bit of tweaking. Still need to add the remaining part of the roofline to the front of the wing, where the roof blends into the wing.

Bill


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Old 05-09-2007, 12:06 AM   #119
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Awsome looking JOB you are doing on that SeaBee!!!!!!!!!! See the enclosed address to send it to, when you are finished > Take care, Scott
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Old 05-09-2007, 05:42 AM   #120
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Originally Posted by ElectricFlyGuy View Post
Awsome looking JOB you are doing on that SeaBee!!!!!!!!!! See the enclosed address to send it to, when you are finished > Take care, Scott
Thanks EFG
How 'bout giving me the address to that video? I'd like to see it, but I'm not going to search that monstrous nonsense site trying to find it. They keep giving me points after I've left. I'm not logging on to a site, that gets money (in so many words) for viewer logon numbers from their advertisers. Even after logging on, I still can't search there. I don't miss that place at all.

As for sending the Seabee, I think this one will be a keeper. I did once ship a guy a 262 for free, minus shipping. He had bought another plane from me. There still may be hope. GP now has a Catalina, of all things. Maybe somebody will pick up this oddball subject, someday. I think it would sell. There is a kit out there, but its a high end, high cost kit. Would be nice to have a parkflyer version.

There's always this very inexpensive version below, but it doesn't quite get it:
no, I didn't accidentally run over my Seabee

Bill


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Old 05-09-2007, 07:35 AM   #121
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Fillets

Finished the roof fillet that blends into the wing and engine cover today. The initial fillets made for the wing did not quite do the job, since there was an area of the roof that was too low.
My new method for finishing low areas beyond 1/32", is to pad with balsa sheet first, sand close to shape as possible, and then add filler. In the past, I would try to do "bondo bodywork" by adding a pile of filler, sanding, adding more, oversanding, etc...
The first pic shows the low area of the blend between the 2 parts, filled and sanded with sheet balsa. Next (second pic) the area is covered with a thin layer of filler.
Also in the pic is the template made for the wire grille, yet to be fabricated.

The wing positon is held constant by the dowel locators, and will compress the Hayes wing saddle foam that will be installed. For the roof's installed position, I approximated the thinner 3M Microfoam one-sided stick foam tape, by shimming the roof with thin cardboard. This was necessary to ensure that the roof seam would be aligned, after the foam seal is installed. I would like to use the thicker wing saddle foam for the roof seal also, but I don't care for the appearance of a thick seal in this mating area. I spent a few hours planing/padding areas of the roof-to-cabin mating flange, so that the seal gap would be consistent within a few thousandths, where the hold down area has a slightly larger gap, to ensure compression of the entire seal.

I'm planning to use strong 3/8" dia rare earth magnets at the front window pillar area, on both sides of the roof. Since the full size plane has an antenna on the roof, I will probably add a scale antenna to be used to pull open the roof.

The 3rd pic shows the finished result of the roof blend. I think this is the last of the difficult fits, with only the interior subfloor and seats being the major remaining parts to go.

Bill


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Old 05-10-2007, 04:05 AM   #122
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Video? I have no videos posted in any forums, only pics of my free flyer conversion. The photos are here in this forum now also. I will post the link for you when I find em' . Take care, Scott.OK, found it>> http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/show...4&postcount=24

Originally Posted by Bill G View Post
Thanks EFG
How 'bout giving me the address to that video? I'd like to see it, but I'm not going to search that monstrous nonsense site trying to find it.
Bill
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Old 05-10-2007, 07:14 AM   #123
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Originally Posted by ElectricFlyGuy View Post
Video? I have no videos posted in any forums, only pics of my free flyer conversion. The photos are here in this forum now also. I will post the link for you when I find em' . Take care, Scott.OK, found it>> http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/show...4&postcount=24
Sorry, I got your post confused with E-Challenged's post about a Short Sunderland video.
You were probably wondering what the heck I was talking about.

Seabee magnetic roof hold down
After thinking about this a bit, I decided to add a center brace to the top cabin window line, for mounting the cabin side magnet. The added cross-brace is not a bad idea in itself, since I've had nightmares about the roofline being demolished in a light mishap.

For anyone who has ever seen the cartoon where the Cuyote turns on the massive magnet that starts drawing ships out of the ocean, these 1/2" dia rare earth magnets are that strong, so I determined one magnet pair would be enough. In the first pic, a cutout was made for the magnet in the cross-brace, which meets the inner roof inside the skylight. Since this area can be seen through the glass, I wanted the cross-brace to closely meet the inner roofline for a clean appearance, when the roof is installed in place. Notice that the half-circle cutout is deeper than the magnet that will be glued into the cutout. This is to lock the roof magnet in alignment with the cabin magnet, so that pressure will be maintained against the rear foam seal of the roof. Also notice a small drill bit in the center of the cabin magnet mounting area. The roof was next installed, and the drill bit was turned by hand, to mark the center spot for the roor magnet's location.

In the second pic, the roof magnet can be seen in place. The ply braces on the sides of the roof center spar were not originally in place, when the magnet was lightly tack glued in place. I did this so that I could break it off and relocate it, if the alignment was not perfect. Well I hit it perfectly on the first shot, and without the added ply braces, I could quickly tell by the sound of shearing balsa that the magnet would tear right off if I tried to remove the roof. I used a knife to carefully pry them apart, and then added ply spars along the center spar of the roof magnet mount, for a strong permanent installation.

The third pic (fuzzy) shows the roof in place, with small pieces of the seal material in place, to verify proper seal compression. The window glass is also cut and laying in place, but not glued down yet.
Why some pics are fuzzy I haven't figured out yet. There will be no more yellow pictures, however. I determined they were due to the 250W sun lamp that lights the area, so I turn it off now when taking pics. That lamp's beam is carefully aimed to be away from any planes hanging in close perimeter, since it will literally vaporize any covering within 1 foot of it.

The real challenge of this build
What makes all these fits such a job is that the plane is a scratch build made for hand cut parts derived off of a 2-view drawing, and not even a plan. Had this been a CAD designed laser-cut kit, these areas would only require a bit of adjustment. Since its not that, these critical mating/sealing surfaces, such as the wing and roof, require massive work to hold one directional tolerances of as little as .010", so that the seals will work properly, and so that the parts align properly.
Well all those areas are finished now, so I get to do easy things like make seats for the interior now.

Bill


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Old 05-10-2007, 03:58 PM   #124
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Nasal spray does not bond balsa worth a darn! I have had the same experience doing basic design from three views, then more detailed design, building, redesigning and keeping up building momentum in completing my Peashooter before the contest deadline. It would have helped if I had prior designing experience but I had to translate old Comet kit building experience to designing a three dimensional fuselage etc, that not only looks like the real thing but has some hope of flying well. Without the deadline, I probably would have stalled at some point due to laziness, model flying activity and other activity. Your project is much more involved and you don't a deadline pushing you. Kudos!
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Old 05-11-2007, 05:43 AM   #125
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Originally Posted by E-Challenged View Post
Nasal spray does not bond balsa worth a darn! I have had the same experience doing basic design from three views, then more detailed design, building, redesigning and keeping up building momentum in completing my Peashooter before the contest deadline. It would have helped if I had prior designing experience but I had to translate old Comet kit building experience to designing a three dimensional fuselage etc, that not only looks like the real thing but has some hope of flying well. Without the deadline, I probably would have stalled at some point due to laziness, model flying activity and other activity. Your project is much more involved and you don't a deadline pushing you. Kudos!
...and CA does not do a very good job of opening clogged nasal passages either.

As for the redesign part, that is one of the reasons why this build would not translate into a good plan. Originally, I was tracing all my parts to document them. Then ended up changing so much, often after being glued onto the build, that it just became a hopeless effort.
The other problem is that for a plane like the Seabee, I would need a copy of ProEngineer at home (anyone care to buy me one). I spent enough years doing the 3D ProE thing, that I would have no desire to design this plane in 2D, like Autocad. Once you design the 3D model, you get the 2D views for free. I'm far to lazy to break out my old copy of ACAD LT97, get back up to pace with the junk, and then draw up a plane like this.

No kidding there! Much more involved than I expected it to be, and I knew I was in for a lot, at the start. I envisioned it just flying together, after the completion of the fuse. Well the fuse has been completed for quite some time now, and I still have a good ways to go before all the detail are done. You make a part for this thing, and there's still 10 more operations to be done to it, before it is complete.

Seabee progress, if that's what you want to call it:
Striped the engine cover tonight. I cheated and used decal trim for the dark blue, after spraying the light blue, which saved a good bit of effort. Probably made the stripes come out a lot cleaner than if I had tried to mask all of them twice as a 2-tone paint job.

MAN AM I TIRED! I fell asleep while adding the last paragraph of this post, woke up, and didn't know what was going on. Did I post it yet? Was I going back in once again to edit the post? Clueless!

Bill


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