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Beginners New to e-power flying? Get the low down in here from experienced e-power RC pilots!

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Old 03-19-2008, 08:46 AM   #101
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Originally Posted by CrashKing View Post
Just wrote a long reply ... then it all disappeared before I could submit it, when AOL decided my mail had "Timed Out"! I hate when that happens!
Yes, not nice at all! Here's a suggestion: write your posting offline, in a text editor or word processor, then when you're happy with it, copy it to the clipboard, then go online, paste it into the message box, add your piccies, and you'll get it all done long before AOL decides your time is up.

Love those ailerons!

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Old 03-19-2008, 03:59 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by RacerPaul View Post
...he does that slow roll while pouring (ahem) iced tea from a pitcher into a glass on the top of the instrument panel... awesome!!


Wow! And I can't even rub my stomach and pat my head at the same time. The next video up on YouTube was this one


That's what I want to be when I grow up, or at least be able to fly RC in that graceful, unhurried way, with perfect control. Maybe having someone play music like that when I fly would help.
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Old 03-20-2008, 10:55 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by Led Zeppelin View Post
Dear participants in the forum, first of all I would like to thank you for sharing your experience with unskilled pilots like me. I’ve been reading your tips for few weeks now and they have been really helpful when I fly my Super Cub. I have five questions drawn from my recent experience and I’ll be very thankful if you could give me some tips:

1) After hand-launching, my Cub tends to fly in clockwise circles without any input on my behalf. This continues even after trimming it (sliding the trim all the way to the left). How can I correct this if the trimming does not help? Does this happen because of strong side-winds or because the vertical stabilizer needs to be fixed (though it looks perfectly vertical to me)?

2) Sometimes when hand-launching the plane into the wind it tends to climb in a very steep almost ‘unnatural” trajectory as if it is going to make a loop by itself. I suppose this extreme lift is caused by gusts of front wind. Should I live the Cub to climb at this steep rate or should I rather limit its angle of climbing by reducing the throttle a notch or slightly pointing down its nose?

3) How to approach a situation where I launch the plane thinking that the wind conditions are calm (they look so on the ground) but it turns out that the weather up there is rather windy? So far I have been launching my Cub only above frozen lakes in Northern Canada. I've read Ed's recommendation to try to point down a bit the plane's nose against the wind to gain speed. But what should I do to land it safely after it gained speed?

4) Last week, I had a great time watching how my SuperCub glided freely as a bird for couple of minutes when his power was automatically cut off due to low battery. I even landed it safely without reengaging the motor! My questions is: isn’t it more safe for the plane to land it with a cut motor (this was my experience) as opposed to trying to ‘flare’ it with engaging the motor, which in most of the cases is hard to execute correctly as usually this prolongs the landing approach as the nose of the plane goes up more than intented?

5) Finally, how do you select where to land the plane when flying over empty fields? In my case it is always at random. Where should one be positioned when landing the plane (behind it? the plane coming straight to me? The plane landing sude to me?) In general my question is where should I be when 1) I start executing a landing approach and 2) when landing the plane on the ground? I've noticed that for a newbie it is easier to be positioned behind the plane but I'm not sure if this is correct.

Thank you very much in advance. I'll be waiting for your tips before I go to fly my Cub again. I love this plane and I want to respect it and prevent it from crashes by flying it properly
Zeppelin, I finally stumbled upon a PF Cub that I must have, and I can appreciate your pleasure with this classic piece of aviation history. Literally decades passed in my life while I vainly attempted to promote modeling joy using Control-Line aircraft, all the while promising myself a four channel Cub some fine day. That day is today or tomorrow depending upon the deal I can get.

Okay, lets get to your questions that might need more discussion. With all of the trimming and adjusting done on my current planes, trimming my new Cub should be a pure pleasure. So, I am now pretending that your Cub is identical to mine as I do some checking and testing. I don't think gusts or side winds are our main problem. In my case since I love to soar windier weather aloft is really neat because of all the thermals that allow no/low power soaring.

First, check the c.g. position. Is it in tolerance fore and aft. In the beginning it is best to locate the c.g. slightly more forward. The side to side c.g. can be a problem also. Add weight to the opposite wing tip to minimize turning in the opposite direction when aerodynamic adjustments alone aren't working. I also check to see if the horizontal stabilizer and wing are not warped or out of alignment with each other. Just a very slight amount of washout or wash-in differential in the wing panels can make a frustrating difference in flight performance.

Because I enjoy light airplanes that can glide nicely and fly slowly, My Cub will start its "life" using light LiPo batteries. If I can do a reasonably nice job I will also remove some "dead wood" from the structure, use carbon fiber push rods, etc., so that I can improve my chances of enjoying comfortably hand launch gliding to check trim before powered flight..

My experience with hand launch gliding has proven to work very well with my motor powered gliders. I am going to be very disappointed if I am unable to enjoy at least limited success hand gliding my Cub. Assuming hand launch gliding is practical, I will adjust the neutral control surfaces positions so that the glide path will allow me to wag the wings, wiggle the tail, and enjoy a little up and down control before the craft settles in for a nice soft touch down. At this point I will nervously, with heart pounding, throat drying, terror, shove the throttle forward to full power and hope for the best! I will attempt to climb out at a reasonable angle that does not bleed off "too much" speed that could result in a stall, level out and throttle back at a "resonable" altitude and then experiment with the controls to get comfortable with flying characteristics. I will try to remember to start my landing sequence when the battery just starts to loose power so that I will have that little extra control that can be useful for landing. Untill now all of my R/C landings have been "dead stick."

The excitement of R/C flying and the exercise of not only walking back and forth to the car for battery replacement but also walking out after the airplane after landing in various places is great for keeping my weight down to healthier levels. So, other than always trying to land into the wind, I don't bother too much with where to land. That is probably not the most "politically correct" attitude to have but then I do tend to be a bit of a maverick, so you might take this with a "grain of salt." Any landing you can walk away from is a good landing! LOL!!!

HAVE FUN! I CAN'T WAIT TO GET MY NEW CUB!

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Old 03-25-2008, 11:50 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by hiflyer View Post
I started with an electric single channel foamie that was rudder only. This let me understand better the function of the rudder, and later on with a powered glider, with rudder and elevator together, I learned the functions of both, and how they relate or function together.
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hiflyer, do those "rudder only" planes actually fly? I understand the concept behind them, but can't imagine how they get any altitude.
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Old 03-26-2008, 12:26 AM   #105
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Many Moons ago when Buffalo still roamed the planes < just how they got on the planes I haven't a clue>..... We had single channel radio control basically it was an escapement that was either spring or rubber band powered and the radio would send out a signal and the escapement would allow turn *** In Only One Direction*** to move the rudder, you had to blip the stick to go from center to right to left back to center it was fun in those days.

Now those airplanes were modified Free Flight planes and they would climb by means of a little up elevator built into the plane and usally a bit of right or left rudder to slowly circle as it climbed out. When it ran out of fuel it would glide back to the ground, yes back then they built planes that actually were aerodynamically sound not flat pieces of foam or what have you. For the Free Flight models those they had timers or snuffer tubes to deploy a spoiler to cause it to come back down < you would like the snuffer tube in it you placed a piece of cotton cord that you lit with a match or lighter and it would burn down till it cut thru a rubber band holding the Spoiler down>.

Lift was achieved thru Airfoils that had a shape to them usually more akin to sail planes undercambered so that you had maximum lift and the wing loading was real low so with the forward thrust from the motor it would just naturally climb out. I would recommend that you google free flight planes or look at some Model magazines like Flying models or free flight <if it is still published> Model airplane news used to have some sections on free flight.

Yes back in those days they really built planes that could actually fly with little to no input from the Modeler...sigh I miss those days...sometimes....

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Old 03-26-2008, 01:30 AM   #106
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ok, Oimmuk, so I am assuming that this plane has a lift system built in already? So there is actually no need for an up/down control? Really the fan jet would take care of this by either cutting or applying the throttle?
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Old 03-26-2008, 06:24 AM   #107
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Originally Posted by Inspired_Art View Post
ok, Oimmuk, so I am assuming that this plane has a lift system built in already? So there is actually no need for an up/down control? Really the fan jet would take care of this by either cutting or applying the throttle?
This link should give you a bit more indepth information about model plane designs and what makes them fly, true you can take a flat board and with enough power make it fly, but not with grace and style.

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Old 03-28-2008, 03:17 AM   #108
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Default Flair Landing?

Zeppelin, now that I am also a proud Cub owner I must attempt to make amends for "not exactly providing the kind of positive information" you were looking for.

After I realized that I had a "real model airplane" coming in the mail it dawned on me that I had better get some flight sim time taking off and landing with real landing gear. It also dawned on me that except for extending the landing path the throttle is not used for landing. The "flair" is performed just before touch down to pull the nose up for a three point landing with "Light planes." Landing a jet on a carrier does not count!

CrashKing, did I get the flair right? By the way I can still feel your composition pain. The only thing that makes me madder than web stuff that goes wrong is when I push the wrong button and lose work that has to be done over again. By following some of the above post's suggestions and a "few" tricks of my own, I finally have made "peace" with the web.

My new Cub is ready for its very first powered flight. With a 1.5 ounce Lipo battery The Cub can be hand launched for a gliding flight that is almost half as long as my motor powered gliders. Being totally inexperienced with using my left hand to operate the rudder I was unable to get my hand on the transmitter quick enough to test rudder and elevator/ailerons on the same flight. A few right hand launches demonstrated some rudder side slip behavior and the ability of the Cub to sustain some fairly hard "landings" (?). I need some training under power at altitude to get used to left handed rudder operation.

oimmuk, great post work! Love those LOL buffalos! My rudder only airplane was capable of turning right with "one blip" and left with "two blips." I lost my first polyhedral wing free flight airplane that climbed up into a thermal and flew away back in the late '50s.
I would stick around more but I gotta do some more stuff to my beautiful new Cub. Mainly I just have to look at it a lot.

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Old 04-01-2008, 05:25 PM   #109
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[FONT='Times New Roman','serif']Jeremy,[/FONT]
[FONT='Times New Roman','serif']We all have been where youíre starting and in many cases have had to rebuild or purchase parts or even worse, buy a new model. I read the comment from rcers and agree with him; you will go through many a plane unless you get proper training. One method that I used is purchasing a good flight simulator. I personally use the Great Planes simulator Real Flight and have had great success. At first you may say the simulator is expensive however, keep in mind the cost of replacing a plane or buying parts. They can cost far more in the long run than the original cost of a flight simulator. There are many other simulators on the market that cost less. Some of those require that you have a transmitter so they will cost less and thatís not a bad thing. Another good simulator is FS One; I have tried it and it works well. The other thing to keep in mind is, you can keep up the flying skills during the winter months when you cannot fly. And if you do crash, and you will, you press a button to rebuild the plane. A fun thing I do is keep track of the crashes and the cost of the destroyed plane. After awhile you will see the amount of money you have saved.[/FONT]
[FONT='Times New Roman','serif']Now having said all of that, I would strongly suggest that find a RC pilot who is willing help you learn to fly. Look for an AMA flying field and you should be able to find a pilot. Many AMA sites have training programs available. I think one of the most important things to do is going the AMA and this will include insurance. They now have a Park Flyer version that cheaper for those who want to fly at local parks. This a great program and having AMA membership is required at any AMA sanctioned filed. AMA stands for Academy of Model Aeronautics. Their web site is www.modelaircraft.org. the phone number is 1-800-I-fly-AMA (435-9262).[/FONT]
[FONT='Times New Roman','serif']The one thing I have been told over and over again is if the cost of this hobby drives you nuts then you should not be flying RC aircraft. However, when things go well you canít beat it for fun. I hope you enjoy it as much as others do.[/FONT]
Happy landings
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Old 04-04-2008, 12:16 AM   #110
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I've also found that time on a simulator makes a big difference, even though it's not really the same as flying a real model. Also, expensive Lipo batteries and brushless motors are not essential to have fun flying, especially when learning. Brushed motors, ESCs, and Ni-MH batteries are dirt cheap these days and still work as well as they did when they were The Latest Thing. I recently lost a brand new $60 Lipo battery when my plane spent 3 days 75 feet up in a tree. While jockying the throttle trying to dislodge it, I somehow got into programming mode and couldn't get it out. When the wind finally blew the plane down, the battery was junk; under 1V per cell. A Ni-MH battery would have been much cheaper and could have been recharged.
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Old 04-04-2008, 04:18 AM   #111
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CrashKing,

The cost of LiPo batteries is one drawback to electric flying if you go above the 40 size motors. This is one reason that I have decided to stay in the 25 size motors. This is one reason that I make sure my batteries are charged stored correctly.
I agree with you regarding flight simulators. Before I returned back to RC flying I would have lost a great number of planes. The flight simulator helped me get the basics down and save money at the same time. When I see someone who is looking at a RC plane and I find out he doesn’t have any flying experience I recommend that he finds either a good instructor or and friend who has a flight simulator or better yet, find one that fits into their budget. I feel its money well spent.
A few weeks ago at the flying site I visit a flyer crashed an Ultastick and the battery pack was bent in half. The pack cost him around $150 and he said it would be awhile before he could purchase a new one. This is a great hobby, but can be an expensive one.
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Old 04-04-2008, 08:45 PM   #112
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Default CRITICAL TAKE OFF ROG INFO, etc.

Jeremy Z, as a self taught R/C'er I always recommend that beginners start their "aviation training program" with something like the "virtually indestructible Air Hogg's Aero Ace." The low price, high quality EXCEED-RC ACCIPITER BADIUS is my particular "weapon of choice" for the second plane, though now it has a lot of competition. All of my R/C airplanes are still flyable, many of which have been crashed and repaired a lot. My last two (2) ABs have never been crashed. Yes, it was time for me to move up to something a "little more stressful" to fly - enter the scale Cub with wheels.

Something that might be useful for other beginning flyers that I don't ever remember learning about is to be sure to allow at least a brief period of time "skimming over the runway" just as the plane lifts off before hauling the stick back. I blamed most of my crashes on take off to "side winds," lack of experience using my left thumb to control rudder, and an out-of-trim airplane. Although all of these factors surely played a part in my disasters, after careful "flight recorder data" examination I am now convinced that most of my recent trauma could have been avoided by simply disciplining myself to "skim over the grass" briefly to build up enough air speed to avoid any stall inducing circumstances before "gingerly" easing the stick back.

Using rudder instead of ailerons is vitally important when flying near stall speed. I got so spoiled flying with coupled aileron/rudder control on my modified motor powered gliders using right stick only, that it is taking time for me to "unlearn" an otherwise instinctive reaction that can destroy.

An unintended benefit from all the above adventures was to gain experience in structural reinforcement improvements that helps provide a greater level of confidence against the increasingly unlikely event of a crash as a result continuous flight training. Confidence based on solid facts eventually pays off in valuable flying practice that builds even more confidence which, in turn, provides motivation for continuing experimentation and growth.

Although I still have one "400 speed" size airplane that is "very happy" using NiMH batteries and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, All of my other planes have demonstrated a very noticeable improvement that is well worth the $20 price of the "new generation" LiPo batteries. I enjoy the slower flight characteristics possible with the lighter wing loadings, as well as the tendency to sustain less damage when attempting to fly "outside the envelope."

One of my main reasons for using LiPos has been to see just how much aerobatics performance I can "squeeze" out of airplanes that are otherwise mainly intended for beginning pilots. Because LiPos have so much power capacity that, in addition to astonishment at daring unusual maneuvers, spectators tend to also be surprised at how long your flights are.

Modeling really is the ultimate way to excite scientific activity. Once science rather than the "religious defense of the status quo" becomes the emphasis in culture, modeling is going to really take off!

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Old 05-17-2008, 06:11 PM   #113
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I'm just learning to fly r/c, but I can't think of any rules that I can foresee being more important than what I learned right off the bat from an Air Force instructor: There's NOTHING more useless than the sky ABOVE you, the runway BEHIND you, or 5 seconds AGO! (Hmmm...seems like that rule would apply to life its ownself... )
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Old 05-19-2008, 09:17 AM   #114
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Default Welcome to R/C Flying

Originally Posted by matador527 View Post
I'm just learning to fly r/c, but I can't think of any rules that I can foresee being more important than what I learned right off the bat from an Air Force instructor: There's NOTHING more useless than the sky ABOVE you, the runway BEHIND you, or 5 seconds AGO! (Hmmm...seems like that rule would apply to life its ownself... )
Hi Mat,

Welcome to R/C flying. We fly in the sky above us, often land on the runways behind us, and wish we had sight of the plane we started with 5 seconds ago.

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Old 05-19-2008, 09:22 AM   #115
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ah i remember the first time i flew/crashed an rc plane.... now if i can just stop crashing heli's i will stop spending so much money... oh wait nvm i just need to learn the heli stuff... the money is spent anyways

what goes up, must come down! *looks around* sometimes they come down harder than we intend
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Old 05-19-2008, 09:37 PM   #116
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Default Orientation Tip

matador, your statement of wisdom would make a fun post signature. Welcome to the emerging new edifying approach to enjoying modeling. Virtually everyone associated with this web site is loaded with helpful ideas and encouragement for new modeling enthusiasts.

The only thing I can think of that you might find useful that tends not to be discussed much is a problem I am still having with certain airplanes.. ORIENTATION (brain thinks plane is in a different orientation than it is) - although flying experience eventually helps, some ideas that might help prevent some "anguish of spirit" include the usual admonitions for beginners to fly slower airplanes with adequate power to weight ratios in order to gain "life saving altitude" fairly quickly. Some of the newer motor powered sail planes fit the bill very nicely and they can easily be aesthetically modified to provide a different enough color on one wing to minimize orientation difficulties.

I haven't actually crashed my newest warbird yet but the increased speed, lower stability, etc, of this machine really makes me nervous. I really hate getting disoriented with it. Naturally, I wouldn't dare mess with it's impressive aesthetics so I am stuck with trying to overcome orientation problems with sheer will power.

The "joy" of overcoming challenges is what makes modeling so priceless (I have to remind myself of this when things don't go quite as well as I think they ought.
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Old 08-09-2008, 05:40 AM   #117
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Default Practice makes perfect - no more disorientation!

THIS IS REALLY IT!

TRIANGLE LOOP WITH ROLLS ON THE STRAIGHT SIDES AND A "REAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT VERTICAL FIGURE EIGHT" WERE FINALLY ACCOMPLISHED TODAY! (8/8/08)

Temperature was in the mid '70's at near sea level air density, airplane weight was 22.5 ounces with a 2.5 ounce 11.1 volt LiPo battery during these two final maneuvers that "needed" to be performed by my ParkZone Spitfire.

The vertical eight is flown by diving at full throttle into an outside loop that begins the figure eight at the bottom of the loop which forms the intersection of the eight. Power is chopped at the top of the outside loop and the Spit performs the rest of the maneuver dead stick. Just as the bottom inside loop is completed at the intersection with the plane inverted, approximately 2/3 throttle is applied and either an inside or an outside barrel roll can be used to bring the craft back to normal level flight.

After climbing to a maximum comfortable cruising altitude from launch this vertical figure eight maneuver will start my "air show performance." Next, a horizontal figure eight with first an inside loop and then an outside loop, are both flown at approximately 2/3 throttle. I find it amazing that this is possible.

At some point near the beginning of the flight while the battery is still at peak power, our "P-38 flying demo triangle with rolls on the straight sides" can be attempted. From about 600 feet altitude gain some speed in a shallow dive at full throttle and perform the maneuver - my final crowning glory with the Spitfire. I am so happy with this airplane words fail me!

I always like to throw in a square loop just for fun before I slack off to 2/3 throttle for all the rest of the maneuvers except consecutive aileron only victory rolls that are performed while climbing and require extra power. Five to fifteen mph winds today had me making a few extra attempts in order to make some of the rest of the maneuvers recognizable.

A HEARTY "TALLY-HO" TO ALL!!!

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Old 08-30-2008, 12:27 PM   #118
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I am having a problem with the third Parkzone P-51 I have bought. (Cheap enough on e-bay thank god) anyway the first one was a diaster crashed and burned several times before I got the hang of it. The second one was much better however the landings are rough for me and it seems thats where I alway run into a problem. The present problem however is very different and I have it on a couple of my planes. When I hand launch the plane it tends to roll to the left and flip over How do I prevent this from happening It does this on my jet also. I have been in this sport or hobby now since March 2008 and have spent many many , many hours on the flight sim with different models. I have bought many , many , many planes and have around 20 in my hangar. Most are park flyers but one is a 60 scale. I am great at building the things and repairing the crash damage but flying them is another story. I have a hobby zone cub that flys really great and have been training on it for a while now and have just recently put a brushless motor in it. WOW!!!! what a difference. Was a little hard to control at first but one I got it trimed out it did just great. Still have a landing problem with this one tho. Landing is not kind to me most of the time.Any way my point is the roll over how do I stop this action on the planes??? I have planes in my hangar that I have not flown yet because I don't want to crash them and I know that I do not have the experience to fly them yet but boy it is hard to stay away from flying them. We don't have a lot of flyers where I live and I usally fly in a old corn field. Very rural where I am so experienced flyers are real hard to find let alone a flying field. Any help would be great .
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Old 08-30-2008, 06:59 PM   #119
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Default Cub's & Mustangs

Eagle, this is what exciting modeling is all about! First you must tell me about your HZ Cub. I have added larger front wheels on mine and can keep from flipping over more than 50% of the time landing on short grass. I plan to add still larger, lighter hollowed out streamlined carbon fiber reinforced balsa wheels with skinny rubber washer tires when I have time get serious about really making it talk to me.
Please tell me what I need to know about your brushless motor and what must be done to the Cub to make it work without burning anything up inside the plane. I use 1.5 - 2 ounce LiPos in my Cub and if I land before running out of power I can usually do a fair job of touching down on landing. I kill the power immediately to prevent burning out the ESC in case the grass is to high and flips me over.

Okay, while you are doing that I will look up the urls for the lighter batteries you need to get the weight down on your Mustang. With 2.5 ounce 11.1 volt LiPos you should be able to launch the P-51 successfully at 2/3 - 3/4 power. Also dial in a little right trim just for the launch phase of the flight, then trim to neutral as you are safely climbing out.

Okay, let me get back to you with some url's for possible use that should help solve all of your challenges.

madwebtvscientist

p.s. My Cub is a FlyZone not a HobbyZone Cub. Sorry about the mistake, I hope you did not go to too much trouble. As excited as I get it's a good thing models not full scale is involved here.
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Old 08-30-2008, 09:31 PM   #120
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Smile Fighter batteries/ launch and landings

Eagle, below are urls for batteries that will help make hand launches easier. It is important to launch straight ahead rather than at a climbing angle that can allow torque to stall out that left wing panel. Another adjustment that can help is to trim both ailerons deflected slightly up. This minimizes "aileron reversal" at slow speed due to tip stalling.

My planes are so light that I don't even take a step during launch, but it is a very good idea to take a couple of steps and put on some serious "oomph" in order to get safely above stalling speed on launch. If it is practical as you face upwind always launch slightly to the right of the wind direction.

Landings should always be into the wind as much as is practical. Due to "trauma induced neurotic responses" from previous aeronautical disasters I often find it necessary to look over my shoulder in order to maintain good control on landing approaches. Using a little power just before touchdown can help the plane fly slower and land more softly than straight dead stick landings. Watch out about applying power too quickly at slow speed, torque can kill. I am not very good at landings myself. Flying is my thing, any landing I can walk away from is a good landing. (LOL).

Here are some killer battery possibilities.

I have two of these and really like them. I added "deans" high current plugs in the place of the little ones that came with the batteries.
http://www.raidentech.com/119015cercfu.html

This battery requires a charge connector adaptor or a connector substitution in order to work with the same chargers as all the other batteries do... I also had to use my Monokote iron to elongate the battery holder on my Spitfire in order for the battery to fit.
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXRVP8&P=6


Here are some interesting choices. I really like the 1500mAh size for long flights.
http://www.raidentech.com/high-perfo...-rc-plane.html

Here is a battery I may try in the future.
http://www.all-battery.com/index.asp...OD&ProdID=2259

Hope all this helps. We have some fun flyers posting over on the HZ Cub and Spitfire threads on the RCU forum who would enjoy reading about your adventures. Drop by and say Hi if you can. The FZ Cub thread would enjoy your experiences also.

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Old 08-31-2008, 05:47 AM   #121
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The battery that I am using is a 1300 mAh 18 c li poly. How much it weights is a guess at "Oh"... 2.5 oz's or less. The motor is a brushless 3550 KV and weight is about 1 1/2 oz but the thrust is out of this world. I am clocking the cub at about 40 mph right now at 1/2 to 2/3 throddle. I am using different servo's that are 9g with 17 oz of tor. one for the rudder and one for the elev. I use the JR synth 790 rx because My TX is the JR Xp 7202 and can hold up to 20 models including heli's. I have 14 models on it now. The Cub was OK with the stock 400 motor that came with it but as I was collecting planes I was also collecting a lot of transmitters to go with them and room became a problem not to mention all the AAA batteries. So I broke down and bought the JR transmitter on E-Bay for 25 bucks. Got a good deal if I do say so myself. Also get all my recievers on E-Bay as well as ESC's and motors. I rarely go to the hobby shop for a part as it cost to much for anything. I can usally pick up a 100 amp ESC for about 40 dollars and 30 amp's for as little as 5 bucks and the motors are pretty cost effective also. Everything else on the Cub is pure stock. I live in a very rural area but there is a very large park 1/2 block from me and a paved road runs right next to it and it is perfect for a runway as very little traffic comes down this way. I like to think of it as my own private little airport runway. It does come in very handy. I made a perfect thre point landing tonight and was just thrilled to the max about it. I use the Cub as my practice plane and it is the first one that I fly each tim eI go out to fly. I figure that If I can fly the Cub I can fly my other warbirds. I have the Parkzone P-51 and FW -190 as well as the Spitfire as I said and they are all great to fly the Spitfire is outragious as I also put a 4000 brushless motor on it. It was wild at first trying to handle it as it was all over the place and trimming it was a bear because it just refused to go slow. I finally got it trimmed out alright and just love to fly it because it handles better than the P-51 and the FW 190. I also have a P-40 warhawk (balsa) anothe rP-51 (balsa) an F4U (balsa) and another spitfire also balsa. I just finished a .60 scale Zero that is fiberglass and balsa but I haver not flown any of the balsa planes yet. They are so pretty and I don't want to crash any of them so I figure once I get good enough on the foam planes I will then got to the wood planes. I also have the Diablo jet that I am training on for ducted fan jet flight and it is my second one. It is not a bad plane but the motors on the dual jet overheat and you lose power after about 200 yards. Guess it is time to change those motors out also. I also have an foam F-18 Hornet jet (the nose has disapeared due to many crashes) that I am using as jet training. Not very good on this one yet. I have one slow flyer the S.E.A 15 bi plane but I can not seem to get it off the ground. I also have a P-40 thunderbolt that has gotten up twice but is a real bear because I bought it as a lot item and got two of them but the motor mounts are awful and the motor kept falling off so I had to try and make my own and so far it has not turned out the way I would like. I have a F-22 raptor waiting to be flown but that will be after I am much better with the jets. I also have the Sapac Griffin JAS 39 that is my next build. I have an F-15 and a Mirage waiting to be built also as well as a Folkker red baron tri plane. Those are my winter projects. My favorate plane is the E-flite P-38 with counter rotating props. What a plane !!!!!!! Takes off smooth as you could want and with the brushless motors it just zips across the sky the way you see them do in the video's. I can do rolls and flips and even fly inverted with that plane and the landings are a dream come true...... so easy. I should have bought this plane first. I am looking to buy a balsa and plywood P-38 but that is down the road. I figure that if I get the Mitchell B-25 or the B-17 for christmas I will be one happy man and my hangar will be complete. Oh I almost forgot also have a Yak 360 that need to be built but I have that on the back burner as I really like the warplanes mosts of all. I guess you can tell that I really have gotten into this hobby since my son got me the little heli last christmas. I have planes all over the garage and the wife just shakes her head and smiles when I talk about them. She's actually happy that I have finally found a hobby that I can throw myself into. I just like all the aspects of this hobby. Building , repairing , upgrading and most of all the flying. I do have a friend who I told about my hobby and he went out and bought a foam A-10 warthog which he left in the box for four months until he finally brought it over to me and I put it together. It's still in the garage as he has not come to get it yet. Ok I am rambling on now. I do prefer to have wheels and roll into the sky rather than hand launch as I feel that I have better control if I can guide it down the runway and get it up. I will take your tips and apply them and see what happens and keep you informed. I will try and get a look at the other threads you mentioned also. As I said I am still fairly new at this hobby about four or five months on the planes so I look to get better with the years and the experience as well as tips from all the nice people here. It's nice to meet you and I am glade we had time to have a little chat.

Darrell D. King
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Old 08-31-2008, 01:54 PM   #122
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The p-51 Model flies like the real thing. You drop the power on landing and it will drop like a rock. Then most people try to power out to hard and it will roll over the same dir as the prop. the same is on take off and to much power it will roll over. you have to build up air speed and power slowly or she will roll over. I have flown both the real thing and the model. Max
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Old 09-02-2008, 12:10 AM   #123
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Default Thanks and torque?

Eagle, thanks for all the information. I got especially excited about your report on the P-38. Please let us know how your P-51, etc., end up flying for you.

With all your enthusiasm, I hope you won't burn out. Your success in such a short time is pretty spectacular! Please try to not get too stressed about anything, modelers like yourself are just too neat to lose.

Air, your experience as a full scale P-51 pilot is priceless. Could you tell us some more about your experiences and your impressions about the P-51?

I do have a question though. I noticed that the torque phenomena on my practice landing approaches always seems to try to force the plane to roll in the opposite direction from the propeller rotation as opposed to the "same dir as the prop" indicated in your post. Could you enlighten me a little more about this matter,"

Thank you very much for your information. My need for a P-51 will probably be delayed until I start learning something a little more positive about it's flying performance qualities. I am really addicted to my PZ Spitfire.

Originally Posted by Air Trucker View Post
The p-51 Model flies like the real thing. You drop the power on landing and it will drop like a rock. Then most people try to power out to hard and it will roll over the same dir as the prop. the same is on take off and to much power it will roll over. you have to build up air speed and power slowly or she will roll over. I have flown both the real thing and the model. Max
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Old 10-04-2008, 02:42 PM   #124
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Originally Posted by madwebtvscientist View Post
Eagle, thanks for all the information. I got especially excited about your report on the P-38. Please let us know how your P-51, etc., end up flying for you.

With all your enthusiasm, I hope you won't burn out. Your success in such a short time is pretty spectacular! Please try to not get too stressed about anything, modelers like yourself are just too neat to lose.

Air, your experience as a full scale P-51 pilot is priceless. Could you tell us some more about your experiences and your impressions about the P-51?

I do have a question though. I noticed that the torque phenomena on my practice landing approaches always seems to try to force the plane to roll in the opposite direction from the propeller rotation as opposed to the "same dir as the prop" indicated in your post. Could you enlighten me a little more about this matter,"

Thank you very much for your information. My need for a P-51 will probably be delayed until I start learning something a little more positive about it's flying performance qualities. I am really addicted to my PZ Spitfire.



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Think he means the opposite of the direction of the prop. It will try to go in a left bank if you apply too much throttle quickly. And im talking about the real one too.

...Keith...
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Old 11-21-2008, 06:32 AM   #125
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Yes, I suspected as much, but I was hoping to make friends with a real Mustang pilot. I am really impressed with the "scale like speed" and with careful stick inputs, "scale like maneuvers" possible with ParkZone WWII warbirds as well as other historic fighters. My Nitro Models F-15 Eagle is actually easier to fly than the WWII fighters and seems to be even easier to fly and maneuver realistically.

It seems a bit strange how difficult it is on this thread to keep a growing conversation going with possible new flying friends. Hopefully the situation will change as modeling takes on a more culturally relevant roll.


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