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Brushless Motor Construction Discuss design and construction of custom Brushless motors

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Old 09-25-2011, 09:20 PM   #1
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Question Fixing connectors to the motor help

Hey guys,
So i recently crashed my skyartec cessna 182 and now i need a replacement motor for it. I've been looking everywhere for one that is correct for my plane (as the website where i bought the plane from has sold out) and finally found one. It arrived a few days ago, the only problem is that the ends of the wires are bare and so i need to buy separate connecters and attach them to the end of the bare wires in order to connect them to the plane. The only problem: i have absolutely no idea how to do this or what I will need. Im a complete novice at soldering and the like although I've heard i may need something called heat shrink tubing. If anybody can guide me through what to buy and how i attach it on to the end of the motor that will be greatly appreciated.
Ps, i live in the UK so if you wish to post any links of products which i will need to buy, i would appreciate it if you can find companies which are UK based
Thanks for the help guys
Sam
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Old 09-25-2011, 09:51 PM   #2
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You need some male bullet connectors, they come in different sizes so without more info i cant say exactly what you need, most likely they will be 3.5mm, if you can measure the diameter of the male part of the connectors on your existing motor that will confirm.
One of the best places to get stuff in the UK is Giant Cod: http://www.giantcod.co.uk/gold-bulle...-p-405126.html
You can get heatshrink at Giant Cod too (5mm).

A good 'how to' guide for soldering bullet connectors is on this page: http://www.innov8tivedesigns.com/#PS
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Old 09-26-2011, 01:43 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by 2006040 View Post
Hey guys,
So i recently crashed my skyartec cessna 182 and now i need a replacement motor for it. I've been looking everywhere for one that is correct for my plane (as the website where i bought the plane from has sold out) and finally found one. It arrived a few days ago, the only problem is that the ends of the wires are bare and so i need to buy separate connecters and attach them to the end of the bare wires in order to connect them to the plane. The only problem: i have absolutely no idea how to do this or what I will need. Im a complete novice at soldering and the like although I've heard i may need something called heat shrink tubing. If anybody can guide me through what to buy and how i attach it on to the end of the motor that will be greatly appreciated.
Ps, i live in the UK so if you wish to post any links of products which i will need to buy, i would appreciate it if you can find companies which are UK based
Thanks for the help guys
Sam
If you're absolutely terrified on soldering, take a look at what we in the USA call "Wire Nuts", available at any local hardware store. Simple, cheap, looks ugly, but they work. Look for one of these with the internal metal coil spring for secure connections. Some of these are all plastic, and are only suitable for very small wires.


These items come in a wide variety of sizes, from very tiny to units that can connect wire sizes on the order of #10, (USA sizes).


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Old 09-26-2011, 04:01 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer View Post
A good 'how to' guide for soldering bullet connectors is on this page: http://www.innov8tivedesigns.com/#PS
This site is awesome and I am glad I came across this thread. I learned that I have been doing soldering the hard way. Thanks JetPlane

Happy flying may your crashes be limited and if they are not limited let them be cool.
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Old 09-26-2011, 04:02 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
If you're absolutely terrified on soldering, take a look at what we in the USA call "Wire Nuts", available at any local hardware store. Simple, cheap, looks ugly, but they work. Look for one of these with the internal metal coil spring for secure connections. Some of these are all plastic, and are only suitable for very small wires.


These items come in a wide variety of sizes, from very tiny to units that can connect wire sizes on the order of #10, (USA sizes).
I use these alot to ensure I have hooked everything up correctly before soldering. Not to mention everything in my house that I have wired have them

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Old 09-26-2011, 05:29 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Fishbonez View Post
I use these alot to ensure I have hooked everything up correctly before soldering. Not to mention everything in my house that I have wired have them

Sounds good!
FYI, one thing that a lot of people just starting out with doing soldering work have problems with, is using a poor quality soldering iron. Especially one that just "Plugs into the outlet". The temperature of the tip of those inexpensive soldering irons can increase to over 900 degrees just sitting on the bench. Then when a soldering attempt is made, that same tip drops below 450 degrees.

I've actually had a soldering iron get so hot, that it would ignite a paper towel after heating up for 5 or 10 minutes. Makes it really hard to do a reliable solder joint, especially when doing several heavy wire connections in a row. One side effect of these irons running so hot, they tend to burn the solder flux into a black varnish on the soldering iron tip. And that burnt flux make it really hard to do a good solder job, unless its cleaned off the tip before soldering.

What really works well is a temperature regulated soldering iron, with about a 40 watt rating. These type irons generally have a variety of tips available for them. Don't know what you have available on the other side of the big pond, but over here, Weller makes good stuff.

I also have a 100 watt temperature regulated iron, with a variety of tips that can handle just about any type of electrical soldering required. Also note the Weller 60P irons that allow the use of smaller diameter tips. (W60P and W100PG)
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=59884

http://www.mouser.com/catalog/catalogUSD/644/2253.pdf

Don't even think of trying one of those soldering "Guns" on electrical work. The temperature of the tips on these things can and will vary all over the map. (I've got three of those soldering guns, from 100 watts to 350 watts. That Weller 100 watt temperature regulated iron far outperforms the 350 watt "Gun") Also have a variety of smaller soldering irons, from a cheap 15 watt pencil iron to an unregulated 60 watt iron. 99% of my soldering work is done with either the 40 watt or 100 watt temperature regulated irons.

Yes, those temperature regulated soldering irons are not cheap. But because they are temperature regulated, they don't overheat to the point where their life is shortened. Before retiring, We'd keep our Weller 40 watt temp regulated irons plugged in 8 hours a day. And they would last for several years. At any given time, our shop would have perhaps 40-50 or more of these irons in service. And we did have several custom built 850 watt temperature regulated soldering irons in the shop! These monsters had 3 inch wide tips on them, and were used to solder solenoid coils wound with 3 inch wide by 0.040 inch thick copper sheeting.

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Old 09-26-2011, 04:51 PM   #7
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thanks for that, I'm confident that i can do this soldering now. Only problem is, I'm not quite sure if it matters what solder i use and if it does, what type should i buy?
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Old 09-26-2011, 04:57 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by 2006040 View Post
thanks for that, I'm confident that i can do this soldering now. Only problem is, I'm not quite sure if it matters what solder i use and if it does, what type should i buy?
Any sort of solder designed for electrical work will do the job. They might have the terminology "60/40" or similar where that number represents the tin/lead ratio.

All solder designed for electrical work uses rosin core solder.

The other main type of solder with built in flux is acid core solder. Acid core solder is designed for plumbing work and similar type uses. Acid core solder must NEVER be used for any electrical work. After several months or years, that acid will eventually corrode what ever wiring was soldered with it.

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Old 09-26-2011, 05:12 PM   #9
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thank you for that. the only other thing I'm wondering is that i might have blown the ESC during my pevious attempt at repairing this motor. Can you tell me if there is any way to know if i have in fact done this or will i need to wait until i connect the motor and see if it works?
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Old 09-26-2011, 08:14 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by 2006040 View Post
thank you for that. the only other thing I'm wondering is that i might have blown the ESC during my pevious attempt at repairing this motor. Can you tell me if there is any way to know if i have in fact done this or will i need to wait until i connect the motor and see if it works?
There is no easy way to see if an ESC functions, without connecting it to a brushless motor and powering it up.

You might consider putting a temporary small instrument fast blow fuse in line with the battery during testing the motor. Be sure to remove the prop, the extra load will blow the motor fuse.

Wind the motor up slowly, if you just crank up the speed, the high current pulled by the motor during winding up could still blow your temporary fuse.

For motors below about 20 Amps rating, a fast blow fuse of about 5-10 Amps will work. For motors below about 60 Amp rating, a fast blow fuse of about 15-20 Amps will work. Be sure to use those round fuses available at Radio Shack and many other places. In England, that would be the 5mm by 20mm fast blow fuses. Don't use those blade type automotive fuses, they are generally very slow blow types.

That way, should your ESC be fried, it would blow the fuse before it takes your battery, or motor with it. And, if you've got shorted windings in the motor, hopefully the fuse will blow before it takes the ESC with it.

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Old 09-27-2011, 05:09 PM   #11
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that all sounds great in theory, but being a complete tech newbie, I'm afraid id have no idea how to go about doing it. Ill see if i can give it a try though so thanks for the advice. I know my motor definitely works fine, so if it doesn't work when i get it hooked up, the only reason i can think of is that the esc is blown. Although like you said, if it ruins the battery and motor ill be in a spot of bother!
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Old 09-30-2011, 04:44 PM   #12
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Just in case, to further Dennis' tip on the wire nuts. In case you may have missed the point. Snip the leads off the old motor, strip a small section of insulation off of each. Then use the wire nuts to connect them to your new motor's leads.

Keep em as close to the same length as possible. This way you can use the connectors already in place, to hook up to your esc.


And you might as well learn to solder if you are flying electrics. Just like learning to fly, it takes practice. But won't take as long and soon you'll be a soldering fool.

When I die, I want to go like my Grandfather did, in his sleep...... Not screaming like the passengers in his plane.
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Old 09-30-2011, 08:47 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Glacier Girl View Post
Just in case, to further Dennis' tip on the wire nuts. In case you may have missed the point. Snip the leads off the old motor, strip a small section of insulation off of each. Then use the wire nuts to connect them to your new motor's leads.
FYI, a few motors use the actual magnet wire itself as the lead out wire for the motor. Motors such as the Hacker line use many strands of this stuff. Problem is, this magnet wire is coated with a very thin very difficult to remove coating of varnish.

So, if you've got a motor like this, would be best to unsolder the connector first, and then solder the new connector to the motor leads.

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Old 10-08-2011, 11:54 AM   #14
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well I've got the motor, the bullet connectors and the heat shrink and I'm all ready to solder theres only one other thing, I'm considering buying a new esc just in case the other one doesn't work and my motor fries as soon as i try to use it. The ESC that is advertised on the website where i bought the plane is a 20A brushless ESC. However, on the website where i buy my spares from, i can only seem to find 30A ESC's. My question is, since my motor is different to the motor i originally had (the new motor is a 1530KV Brushless motor, I'm not quite sure what the original was but i can find out if it is important) will that mean that i will need a different ESC? Or will i still need to get a 20A one? And if this is so, will any 20A ESC be suitable or will it have to be a specific one such as the one i originally got with the plane? Thanks for the help guys
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Old 10-08-2011, 04:06 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by 2006040 View Post
well I've got the motor, the bullet connectors and the heat shrink and I'm all ready to solder theres only one other thing, I'm considering buying a new esc just in case the other one doesn't work and my motor fries as soon as i try to use it. The ESC that is advertised on the website where i bought the plane is a 20A brushless ESC. However, on the website where i buy my spares from, i can only seem to find 30A ESC's. My question is, since my motor is different to the motor i originally had (the new motor is a 1530KV Brushless motor, I'm not quite sure what the original was but i can find out if it is important) will that mean that i will need a different ESC? Or will i still need to get a 20A one? And if this is so, will any 20A ESC be suitable or will it have to be a specific one such as the one i originally got with the plane? Thanks for the help guys
Generally, if you go from a "20 Amp" ESC to a larger unit, it won't be a problem as far as running the motor and prop. The larger unit will weigh more, and perhaps cost more.

Just a note, the current pulled by the motor out of the battery through the ESC is determined by the motor and the size prop on that motor. With no prop at all, the motor will pull what's called its no load current. Putting a small prop on the motor, it will pull somewhat more. With the proper size prop, the motor will pull its rated current.

And putting a 150% "to large" of a prop on that motor will allow the motor to pull far to much current, burning up the motor, and possibly the ESC and battery.

That's why those wattmeters are so important. These motors are DUMB.
They will happily turn over props that are way to big, until the magic smoke comes out of the motor windings.

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