Wattflyer RC Network: RC Universe :: RCU Magazine :: RCU Forums :: RCU Classifieds :: RCU User Reviews :: RCU YouTube
Home Who's Online Calendar Today's Posts RealTime Post Spy Mark Forums Read
Go Back   WattFlyer RC Electric Flight Forums - Discuss radio control eflight > Electric R/C Airplanes > Beginners
Register Members List Wattflyer Extras Articles Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Social Groups

Beginners New to e-power flying? Get the low down in here from experienced e-power RC pilots!

Thank you for your support (hide ads)
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-26-2013, 01:55 PM   #1
BaronBernie
Baron Bernie
 
BaronBernie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: New York
Posts: 43
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Club: Western New York Sailplane And Electrical Plane Flying Club
Send a message via Yahoo to BaronBernie
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default Safety First

What does flying e-planes, cooking, and operating machinary have in commom? The answer is personal safety. We all know that when in a hurry we do not think about what we are doing, and thats when accidents happen. It may be wise to adopt the full scale protocall in having a checklist before continuing. There are engine checlist, preflight checklist just to mention a few. It seems wise to take a moment even if it takes just a few seconds,to think about what is being done. Be safe in what is being done and leave with no injurues.
Safety first is not just a good idea but in general a good way in life.
BaronBernie is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 03:50 PM   #2
dahawk
Super Contributor
 
dahawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Keller, TX
Posts: 3,496
View dahawk's Gallery6
Thanked 217 Times in 213 Posts
Club: 114th RC Aero Squadron
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (19)
Default

Baron,

+1 on your comments. Safety is a habit.
dahawk is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 05:41 PM   #3
BaronBernie
Baron Bernie
 
BaronBernie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: New York
Posts: 43
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Club: Western New York Sailplane And Electrical Plane Flying Club
Send a message via Yahoo to BaronBernie
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Does any one else have a safety story to contribute? What safety tips do you have to share? Feel free to contribute your story to help others stay safe.
BaronBernie is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 07:40 PM   #4
LowThudd
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 218
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

This may only apply to the Turnigy 9x and Open9x software, but...Be very carefull when first using a downloaded template. I recently was trying to get a micro heli template to work on my T-Rex 100 and ended up with a runaway! Something got screwed up somewhere(I dunno what), and while I was fideling with the programming on the Tx it suddenly went full throttle. Would not stop even with the throttle cut, or even turning off the Tx. I just had to grab it and yank the battery. Thank God it wasn't a larger heli.

I believe my problem occured from converting a Er9x eepe to a Open9x hex program. So it was probably a fluke, and possibly something I screwed up in the conversion and transfer/flash.

Lesson is, make sure you test any new setting that you have downloaded, or programmed on the computer VERY carefully. Also, be very aware what changes you are making on the Tx, and UNPLUG the batt during any major changes.
LowThudd is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 08:05 PM   #5
Chucksolo69
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 262
Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

One of the best things to add to an electric system is the safety system where you have to plug in a "Dean's" type connector between the ESC and motor to comlete the circuit that arms the motor. This certainly helps to prevent the motor/prop turning until you want it to. Always remove the prop when you are working on your aircraft. I am slowly but surely replacing the ESCs in my planes to the Hobbico type, where you have to physically ARM the motor before the prop will turn. This just takes putting the throttle stick to it's highest position, waiting for the single beep, and then lowering the throttle stick all the way down and waiting for 2 beeps. This is a very, very safe system.
Chucksolo69 is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2013, 11:53 AM   #6
BaronBernie
Baron Bernie
 
BaronBernie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: New York
Posts: 43
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Club: Western New York Sailplane And Electrical Plane Flying Club
Send a message via Yahoo to BaronBernie
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Great! Thanx for sharing LowThudd and Chucksolo69!
BaronBernie is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 10:40 AM   #7
fhhuber
Super Contributor
 
fhhuber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2,325
Thanked 232 Times in 223 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

A general safety rule that is rarely discussed but needs attention:

Aircraft are replaceable. People are not. If there is a possibility of endangering a person's safety then the aircraft should be sacrificed to protect the person.

In keeping with that... Failsafes should be set if your radio has that capability .
0 throttle (stop the circular saw on the nose of the aircraft) Full rudder, full elevator, full aileron.
This will result in a spin. The aircraft will go almost straight down and impact will be at relatively low speed (especially compared to a full power dive)
Failsafe is to protect PEOPLE, not the model.

If the model went into failsafe you can easily assume that the condition will not cure itself. SOMETHING is seriously wrong.
If control comes back then land as quickly as possible. If there is any doubt about being able to safely land the plane then BURY IT in the dirt or a tree.

If you can't afford for the model to be destroyed when you have the choice of the model's safety vs a person's safety... you are in the wrong hobby.
fhhuber is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 02:02 PM   #8
tobydogs
love to build!
 
tobydogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: nj usa
Posts: 3,037
Thanked 202 Times in 199 Posts
Club: rcrcc rockland county,ny
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award 
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (17)
Default

when at the tables at the field,always face the prop away from folks sitting in chairs while running the motor up to tune or test ep. i saw a prop fly off a glow model over my head and another pilot while we sat way back. also don't let site see'ers distract you from your routine of setting up less they cause you to forgett something resulting in hazard to self or them.
keep visitors who you don't know away from the flight or theyll start asking questions like"how high is it,how fast,what is the motor made of,was it hard to build,and of coarse the final question...what happen,will you be able to repair it........ggrrrrrrrr.....answer...no!!!!

when running a model up in the workshop,make sure there are no loose items in the prop wash.

narrow is the place to land...wide is the space to crash....choose the narrow way!
tobydogs is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 03:10 PM   #9
BaronBernie
Baron Bernie
 
BaronBernie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: New York
Posts: 43
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Club: Western New York Sailplane And Electrical Plane Flying Club
Send a message via Yahoo to BaronBernie
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

For those who are not fermliar with the term "prop wash", it is not a chemical that is used to clean a propeller, but it is the wind produced by the rotating propeller.

Low and slow is the way to go!
BaronBernie is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 05:36 PM   #10
JetPlaneFlyer
Super Contributor
 
JetPlaneFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland
Posts: 4,511
Thanked 495 Times in 461 Posts
Awards Showcase

5kW  Outstanding Contributor Award  1kW 
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (8)
Default

Originally Posted by fhhuber View Post
If there is any doubt about being able to safely land the plane then BURY IT in the dirt or a tree.
I think that's a over the top. Taken literally you would have to stomp on your plane before you ever even took off, because there is a certain element of doubt (no matter how good you are) that you will bring your model home on any flight... Stuff happens sometimes.

I don't think there are any among us who would not try to land a plane if we had halfway decent control of it. Who hasn't landed a plane 'dead stick, even though a dead stick landing carries higher risk? In fact dead stick landing is a basic safety drill that learners have to be able to demonstrate to get their basic flying certificate

I landed a plane a couple of weeks ago with an aileron servo dead. Obviously in flight I didn't know for sure what was wrong other than the plane was responding 'funny' to aileron and something had gone wrong. I landed no problem, no damage, no-one hurt. Would deliberately crashing have been the 'safe' thing to do in your book?
JetPlaneFlyer is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 06:39 PM   #11
cyclops2
Super Contributor
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,956
Thanked 43 Times in 41 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default At 75

I do stupid things occasionally.

Age DOES MATTER.
cyclops2 is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 06:44 PM   #12
cyclops2
Super Contributor
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,956
Thanked 43 Times in 41 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Post #7 goes for a lot of sports.

But many people value their toy more than a person. Seen that many times at events & told the fliers that.

Most answered back.

It was not that close to hitting them at 45 mph with a + 20 pound plane.
cyclops2 is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 10:14 PM   #13
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,371
Thanked 722 Times in 704 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by BaronBernie View Post
What does flying e-planes, cooking, and operating machinary have in commom? The answer is personal safety. We all know that when in a hurry we do not think about what we are doing, and thats when accidents happen. It may be wise to adopt the full scale protocall in having a checklist before continuing. There are engine checlist, preflight checklist just to mention a few. It seems wise to take a moment even if it takes just a few seconds,to think about what is being done. Be safe in what is being done and leave with no injurues.
Safety first is not just a good idea but in general a good way in life.
Yeah
Especially with the larger models with perhaps with a 1KW motor or more up front. IMHO, these larger models absolutely need a positive battery disconnect, plus, a safety arming switch in the transmitter.

My Spektrum DX8 makes it very easy to use a second switch (I used the gear switch) that must be thrown before the throttle will command power to the motor.

The same can be done with the original DX7's, but it's a bit more work. I can provide details on how to do it from information found on the Internet.

Last Friday, I was carrying my Kantana with its Hacker A50-12S motor back from the flight line, when my jacket hit the throttle, moving the rudder, and applying a bit of power to the motor. Nothing happened, the gear switch was in the motor "OFF" position.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 11:30 PM   #14
cc83
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 53
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

I second (third?) programming a throttle cut into the radio, on the dx8 it's a function available to air and heli programming (you can use a mix in other radios), I put it on the throttle hold switch and put a bright red rubber screw protector cap on it as a reminder and warning, also the switch is set to cut off pulled towards me as that is the position most protected and likely for the switch to be bumped into. I modified a dx6i a couple years ago by replacing the throttle cut button with a switch, it's fairly simple with a little soldering. like here : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bEGjjMDzR4

I found a switch in my parts bin I had from radio shack that required no case modification. There are also "locking" switches, that require the switch be pulled up to move it. I believe some graupner tray radios have this option. http://www.mouser.com/Search/Refine....+locking+lever
cc83 is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 02:03 AM   #15
xmech2k
Ya got any Beeman's?
 
xmech2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,799
View xmech2k's Gallery21
Thanked 265 Times in 263 Posts
Club: CVMRCC, SEFSD
Awards Showcase

Scratchbuilders Award  1kW  Outstanding Contributor Award 
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (8)
Default

A funny (Since no one was hurt) thing happened due to my safety consciousness. I was at a powered glider competition, and right after launch I was bringing my right hand down to the tx, and my fingers brushed the switches on the top right corner, of course hitting my throttle kill switch. My plane went from rocket to lawn dart before I could react. I didn't know to get the switch or get the elevator and pull out of the dive. (In the future, I'll be ready, but never considered this happening before.) Did a total lawn dart from I guess 15-20 feet, I don't know since it happened so fast. Lucky no one was where it hit. Amazingly, the plane came away undamaged! If I wasn't safety conscious with a throttle kill switch, it wouldn't have happened! Of course, I'm not getting rid of it, it's just weird how it happened. That would be like the argument of not wearing your seat belt because you might not be able to get out of your burning/sinking car if you have an accident.
xmech2k is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 02:45 AM   #16
robschonk
Member
 
robschonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

Originally Posted by BaronBernie View Post
For those who are not fermliar with the term "prop wash", it is not a chemical that is used to clean a propeller, but it is the wind produced by the rotating propeller.
When I was working as a line boy for Piedmont Aviation while in High School, we'd send all the newbies over to the parts department for a bucket of prop wash and a spool of flight line....
robschonk is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 02:48 AM   #17
robschonk
Member
 
robschonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (0)
Default

Here's a good example of what not to do.

http://youtu.be/CQfZTPLvPp0
robschonk is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 03:04 AM   #18
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,371
Thanked 722 Times in 704 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by cc83 View Post
I found a switch in my parts bin I had from radio shack that required no case modification. There are also "locking" switches, that require the switch be pulled up to move it. I believe some graupner tray radios have this option. http://www.mouser.com/Search/Refine....+locking+lever
Yeah
We used those "Locking" type of toggle switches at work a few years ago as a three phase "Ground Trip Blocking" switch on a high voltage substation breaker control.

These switches can not be moved, unless you grab the "Bat" handle, pull up on it, then swing it to the other position.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2013, 04:00 AM   #19
Beemerider
Member
 
Beemerider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Shenandoah Valley Of Virginia
Posts: 393
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Club: Augusta County RC Club
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Originally Posted by robschonk View Post
Here's a good example of what not to do.

http://youtu.be/CQfZTPLvPp0
I saw that a month or so ago. Incredible.

I was our company's safety manager and safety instructor for many years (communication tower construction). We took safety very seriously and as a result in over 25 yrs of fellas working at 300+ ft up we never had a serious injury much less a fall. Sadly the industry itself has not been that good. But no matter what you do whether it be work or play there is a question you must always ask yourself-- "What is the worst thing that could happen?" Once you answer that question you take the proper precautions to prevent that from happening.

Proper safety training is paramount.
Beemerider is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2013, 05:10 AM   #20
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,371
Thanked 722 Times in 704 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by Beemerider View Post
I saw that a month or so ago. Incredible.

I was our company's safety manager and safety instructor for many years (communication tower construction). We took safety very seriously and as a result in over 25 yrs of fellas working at 300+ ft up we never had a serious injury much less a fall. Sadly the industry itself has not been that good. But no matter what you do whether it be work or play there is a question you must always ask yourself-- "What is the worst thing that could happen?" Once you answer that question you take the proper precautions to prevent that from happening.

Proper safety training is paramount.
Wow, that guy was lucky to not be a part of that heli's rotor.

As for climbing towers and such, years ago, we had a neighbor that owned a business climbing radio towers, power plant smoke stacks, anything that was over 100 feet from the ground.

The poor SOB died in a fall, leaving a wife and two teenagers. He fell off his single story garage roof.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2013, 11:24 AM   #21
BaronBernie
Baron Bernie
 
BaronBernie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: New York
Posts: 43
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Club: Western New York Sailplane And Electrical Plane Flying Club
Send a message via Yahoo to BaronBernie
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Just like many of you, I too worked in a modern up to date job using a scientific press. With all the ISO traing, OSHA regulations and safety traing preached at our monthy safety meetings, someone still got hurt. Safety is a personal thing that requires you to stop and think. If what you are doing is to large or to heavy, STOP, and get someone to help you. Body parts are not replaceable, but plane parts are.

Low and slow is the way to go!
BaronBernie is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2013, 11:56 PM   #22
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,371
Thanked 722 Times in 704 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by BaronBernie View Post
Just like many of you, I too worked in a modern up to date job using a scientific press. With all the ISO traing, OSHA regulations and safety traing preached at our monthy safety meetings, someone still got hurt. Safety is a personal thing that requires you to stop and think. If what you are doing is to large or to heavy, STOP, and get someone to help you. Body parts are not replaceable, but plane parts are.
Reminds me of about 10 years ago, where the company I worked at got bought out by a much larger company. The top management of that company took a walk through our shop, and had major fits when he saw employees using manual screwdrivers on the assembly lines.

"Haven't you heard of Carpal Tunnel Problems"? Two weeks later every employee that used screwdrivers in the shop had power screwdrivers.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 12:35 AM   #23
fhhuber
Super Contributor
 
fhhuber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2,325
Thanked 232 Times in 223 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

Electric screwdrivers are faster too... and some can be adjusted to give the same torque every time.
fhhuber is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 12:51 AM   #24
BaronBernie
Baron Bernie
 
BaronBernie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: New York
Posts: 43
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Club: Western New York Sailplane And Electrical Plane Flying Club
Send a message via Yahoo to BaronBernie
iTrader: (0)
Friends: (1)
Default

LOL, good idea!

Low and slow is the way to go!
BaronBernie is offline  
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 03:11 AM   #25
kyleservicetech
Dennis V
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,371
Thanked 722 Times in 704 Posts
Club: www.racinercclub.com (I'm the newsletter editor)
Awards Showcase

Outstanding Contributor Award  3kW  2kW  100mph Speed Demon 
iTrader: (1)
Friends: (20)
Default

Originally Posted by xmech2k View Post
A funny (Since no one was hurt) thing happened due to my safety consciousness. I was at a powered glider competition, and right after launch I was bringing my right hand down to the tx, and my fingers brushed the switches on the top right corner, of course hitting my throttle kill switch. My plane went from rocket to lawn dart before I could react. I didn't know to get the switch or get the elevator and pull out of the dive. (In the future, I'll be ready, but never considered this happening before.) Did a total lawn dart from I guess 15-20 feet, I don't know since it happened so fast. Lucky no one was where it hit. Amazingly, the plane came away undamaged! If I wasn't safety conscious with a throttle kill switch, it wouldn't have happened! Of course, I'm not getting rid of it, it's just weird how it happened. That would be like the argument of not wearing your seat belt because you might not be able to get out of your burning/sinking car if you have an accident.
One reason I used the "Gear Switch" on the other side of the transmitter for the throttle kill function. Nowhere near the aileron/elevator stick.

DennyV
Retired and the days are just too short, busier than ever!
kyleservicetech is online now  
  Reply With Quote
Reply

  WattFlyer RC Electric Flight Forums - Discuss radio control eflight > Electric R/C Airplanes > Beginners

« Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Safety Plane tr4252 General Electric Discussions 3 09-16-2012 07:36 PM
Throttle & Spoilers on same stick & motor safety swich Rajah Hi-Performance and Sailplanes 0 06-20-2012 07:05 AM
Spektrum DX8 Safety Warning! z-8 RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros 53 03-20-2011 04:10 AM
Cell pro 10s safety code 96 Jlbrad1 FMA Direct 3 02-11-2011 11:17 PM
El Cheapo Battery Safety NJSwede Batteries & Chargers 2 01-31-2011 05:38 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:39 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2005 WattfFlyer.com
RCU Eflight HQ

Charities we support Select: Yorkie Rescue  ::  Crohn's & Colitis Foundation



Page generated in 0.30064 seconds with 67 queries