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View Full Version : Air Conditioning - whats your Temp?


aviatordave
08-01-2008, 02:05 PM
My wife and I are battling over what we think the temperature should be in the house with the AC on. I'm kind of a tight wad and like to save money, so I keep it at about 80 degrees. My wife thinks it should be in the mid 70's.

What temperature do you all keep yours set at?

Grasshopper
08-01-2008, 02:26 PM
My wife and I are on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to temperature. I prefer it to be 72 degrees or colder and she prefers it to be 76 or warmer. But then again, I wear shorts, T shirt and flip flops year round in the house while she's wrapped up with a wool blanket most of the time.

Liquidity
08-01-2008, 02:33 PM
I used to keep mine at 70 last year. This year I raised it to 72. Then my AC broke. Luckily I have a good friend that came over and fixed it. After seeing a retarded electric bill, I know keep it at 74 during the morning and afternoon, 73 in the evening, and 72 at night.

It has to be cool for me to fall asleep

Liquidity
08-01-2008, 02:34 PM
When my ac was broken, it would get up to 80 in the early evening. It is absolutely misearble. I am sure the dense humid air did not help much either.

pd1
08-01-2008, 02:36 PM
My AC is set for 72, but the house stays around 74 to 75.
Warmer in the daytime and I too like it cool for sleeping.

Paul

1320fastback
08-01-2008, 02:38 PM
No A/C for me, just the cool ocean breeze :tc:

firemanbill
08-01-2008, 06:21 PM
I chose 74 as an average. We have a programmable thermostat that takes it up to 78 during the day while we are all at school or at work. Then down to 73 for the evenings and back up to 76 while we are sleeping.

That coupled with the new system we have has kept my electric bill (no gas) to a max of $160 even during the most extreme months. Usually it is around $115.

Tinman
08-01-2008, 06:55 PM
Wow I guess I'm on the cool side, 71 for me.

But if it was up to my wallet it would be 78.....

adhoc
08-01-2008, 08:22 PM
Many houses in the Pacific Northwest don't have AC at all. As a transplanted East Coaster, I'm still getting used to this. Admittedly, there are relatively few days that get really hot, and most of the year it is quite pleasant (winters get too cold for my tastes).

We've been in the 60s and 70s for the most part lately. Might get into the 80s next week...

So this poll doesn't have the answer I would give: "Don't have it, don't need it."

(My wife and I do joust over the heating settings, and she's the tightwad there...)

rcers
08-01-2008, 08:51 PM
78 day 76 night....

Here in our land - 103 today with a heat index of 110+ if you do 70 you pay serious bucks. Our July or August bill with those settings are generally about $550 yow!:eek:

Mike

aviatordave
08-01-2008, 09:03 PM
$550 a month? WOW is right. And here I am fussing over $125 a month electric bill with AC.

But in the winter, our gas bill goes up to about $150 a month for heat while during the summer its about $30 a month (water heater only)

Liquidity
08-01-2008, 09:12 PM
My house is all electric. Our typical bill in the summer time is $130-140. Last month with my broken ac it was $200.

From the late fall until early spring our bill is around $90

I love not having a monthly gas bill. I do have a large propane tank out back to power our fireplace, but that is all. It was filled once 2 years ago, never since then

Rabbitcreekok
08-01-2008, 09:46 PM
Wow I guess I'm on the cool side, 71 for me.

But if it was up to my wallet it would be 78.....

Hey Tinman, where have you been. Still boring holes in the sky with students?

I keep my thermostat set on 70 because my office gets a little warm if I raise the thermostat any. I am not inclined to sweat while at work, unless I am out in the field. Of course my three computers generate a lot of heat, which does not help.

We have a heat pump and average out electric bills over the year so it is all about the same. Don't have gas, well natural gas, well, out of the ground.:tc:

Pudknocker71
08-01-2008, 09:51 PM
80 during the day and 74 at night. Ceiling fan on high in the MB. '02 house and bills still $170 average.

birdDog
08-02-2008, 12:41 AM
:oWOW! I guess I take the El'cheapo award! I leave the house closed up and set at 84ish when I leave for work. Just the dog is here. I like to keep it on during the day just to keep the darn humidity down. When I come home I set it down a few degrees and it usually does not run for long. Just to keep it decent for sleeping with the ceiling fan running.

I spend more time in the basement in the summer since I dont think I have seen it exceed 71 degrees.

$55 electric bill last month, Still paying down the last plane I had fly away:(

gfdengine204
08-02-2008, 01:30 AM
I keep A/C at 70 24/7. My wife's asthma pretty much dictates the need for dehumidified air. Her mom lives with us, otherwise I would kick it up to 78-80 (programmable thermostat).

In the winter, I set the thermostat 68 day/60-62 nite.

rcproptester
08-02-2008, 10:56 AM
I usually keep mine at 75 during the day.... set back to 77 at night....
With 3 kids and 95+ deg outside..... My elec bill runs about 300-350 in the summer...

yank51
08-02-2008, 04:34 PM
Dang Jeff, how big is your house?? Maybe a little insulation is in order? We've got a 1750 sq.ft. house, and with total electric our highest bill I've ever seen was up to $200 for the month. That was a year or so ago, when they added "fuel surcharges" to everyones bills, remember? Our bill last month was $155 or so, which is not bad considering the heat around here. We keep our summer setting at 78 unless we have company, and our winter settings vary between 68 at night and when no one is home, to 70 when we are there..... Just having it dry in here is nice compared to the humidity out there (brutal out there already. Bryan is right, build in the summer, fly in the winter...:rolleyes:)

aviatordave
08-02-2008, 04:59 PM
Windows open today with fans on. Its only going to be in the 80's, not so humid. The nice thing is at night it cools down to about 55-60

yank51
08-02-2008, 05:22 PM
Good flying weather, unless the wind is too strong...:roll:

clockworks
08-02-2008, 05:28 PM
Not much call for domestic aircon here in the UK - just as well with the price we pay for electricity (around 0.35 USD per kwh).

Where I live, the outside temperature rarely goes over 80, or falls below freezing. My house, built before 1850, has thick stone walls, so it stays cool during the day in summer and gives out heat at night. No need for heating or cooling between June and September.
I do need to run a dehumidifier, though. The house was built without a damp course. Most of it has now been "tanked", but one room still needs the floor re-laying and the walls sealing.

Liquidity
08-02-2008, 05:30 PM
WOW! I wish I had a home that was built before 1850. That is incredible. My 2006 home just does not compare

clockworks
08-02-2008, 08:02 PM
WOW! I wish I had a home that was built before 1850. That is incredible. My 2006 home just does not compare

That kind of thing tickles me. I remember hearing a story (probably apocryphal) about an American lady asking if a house she was visiting in England was pre WW2. The owner replied that it was pre America!
Not exactly sure how old my house is, but I've got copies of the title deeds going back to about 1840.

A lot of houses in this area were built in the 19th century. Many were built to house farm or mine workers, often by the land/mine owners - an early form of social housing. I believe that the majority of the UK's housing stock is pre WW2.
When my parents were looking to move house about 10 years ago, they went to view a large farm house in a small village on the wilds of Bodmin Moor (near Jamaica Inn and other places made famous by the books of Daphne du Maurier). Parts of that house were built in the 14th century.

Living in an old house does have certain benefits. The rooms tend to be larger, and they have "character". The downsides are draughts, damp and bad plumbing. Pre WW2, most British houses still had outside toilets, no bath and no plumbed hot water. Of course, they've been updated, but the work was often done badly.
Old houses have also been the subject of "modernisation" over the years. Again, this work was often bodged.
I've lived in my house for 10 years. Each room has been gutted and rebuilt. Just one left to do now.

Seeing some of the houses in the US suburbs, I'd trade.

FlyWheel
08-02-2008, 08:49 PM
78, but that's because my roommate is part polar bear, if he had his way it would be 65 year round. I would be more comfortable at 80 myself.

aviatordave
08-02-2008, 10:42 PM
Not much call for domestic aircon here in the UK - just as well with the price we pay for electricity (around 0.35 USD per kwh).

Where I live, the outside temperature rarely goes over 80, or falls below freezing. My house, built before 1850, has thick stone walls, so it stays cool during the day in summer and gives out heat at night. No need for heating or cooling between June and September.
I do need to run a dehumidifier, though. The house was built without a damp course. Most of it has now been "tanked", but one room still needs the floor re-laying and the walls sealing.

Any ghosts lurking around at night?

We got some 1800 era houses here in Iowa still standing, mainly connected to farmland that has been passed down from generation to generation. Some are really taken care of and updated with central air, permanent siding, modern wiring and plumbing.

My house was built in 1983.....its boring.

Tinman
08-02-2008, 11:18 PM
My house was built in 1902, thank goodness its been modernized.

Hows the corn treating you Dave? almost time to chop it down? :D

clockworks
08-03-2008, 09:05 AM
Any ghosts lurking around at night?

We got some 1800 era houses here in Iowa still standing, mainly connected to farmland that has been passed down from generation to generation. Some are really taken care of and updated with central air, permanent siding, modern wiring and plumbing.

My house was built in 1983.....its boring.

No ghosts, but I know for sure that at least one person has died in the house as there's "coffin drop". Old rural houses had very narrow, steep, staircases, often with doors at the lower level. This made bringing a coffin down the stairs almost impossible.

It was common practice to cut a hole through the floorboards and lower the coffin on ropes. There's evidence of this in my house.

I think "siding" is what we call cladding - an external covering designed to weatherproof a building. I assume that most of your old houses are timber framed, originally covered with planking?

Most of the houses in this area are built from granite, as there's no brickworks for miles (no clay to make the bricks). The more up-market houses are made from cut granite blocks, while the "working man's" houses are made from rough granite rocks, infilled with rubble and mud. No cement was used in the basic construction.

chuck
08-03-2008, 05:54 PM
78 full-time with ceiling fans in every room except the guest B/R(don't want 'em to get too comfy). The fans seem to add another 2-3 degrees of cooling with the air movement.

How many of you run the A/C fan full time instead of on auto? Some people tell me they think that helps cool the house.


Chuck

Liquidity
08-03-2008, 06:20 PM
When I was having problems with my allergies, I ran the fan all the time for 1 week straight to try to force the hopuse air through the filters.

Other than that, I leave it on auto.

rcproptester
08-04-2008, 09:53 AM
Dang Jeff, how big is your house?? Maybe a little insulation is in order? We've got a 1750 sq.ft. house, and with total electric our highest bill I've ever seen was up to $200 for the month. That was a year or so ago, when they added "fuel surcharges" to everyones bills, remember? Our bill last month was $155 or so, which is not bad considering the heat around here. We keep our summer setting at 78 unless we have company, and our winter settings vary between 68 at night and when no one is home, to 70 when we are there..... Just having it dry in here is nice compared to the humidity out there (brutal out there already. Bryan is right, build in the summer, fly in the winter...:rolleyes:)
My unit is undersized, therefore it runs all the time.
I have plans to add on to the house and upgrade the entire system, but will have to suffer till then....
The $300 elec bill is already in the budget, so lowering that by 1/2 will be like getting new money;-)