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-   -   Tech Tip - Servo Torque Illustration (https://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=78369)

ServoCity 02-21-2017 04:06 PM

Tech Tip - Servo Torque Illustration
 
You can look at servo torque all day on paper, but we thought we'd give you a visual understanding what some of those specs end up looking like compared to other servos side by side.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9I2Q7Z7mSC0&t=3s
http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f2...psfxxwhihw.jpg

HS-311 Servo https://www.servocity.com/hs-311-servo
HS-645MG Servo https://www.servocity.com/hs-645mg-servo
HSB-9380TH https://www.servocity.com/hsb-9380th-servo

birdDog 02-22-2017 12:10 AM

Fun video. I am assuming there is not, but is there a standard employed across different brands in length of moment for gauging these specs?

dereckbc 02-22-2017 12:40 AM

Well assuming you did not sleep through math and science classes, if you even bothered to take classes, use 12:1 to visualize.

Foot Pounds is easier to visualize. It takes 12 inch-ounces to equal 1 ft-lb. So if that servo arm is 1 foot long 12 inch pounds will lift 1 pound.

Cool video though.

birdDog 02-22-2017 01:03 AM


Originally Posted by dereckbc (Post 1003887)
Well assuming you did not sleep through math and science classes, if you even bothered to take classes, use 12:1 to visualize.

Foot Pounds is easier to visualize. It takes 12 inch-ounces to equal 1 ft-lb. So if that servo arm is 1 foot long 12 inch pounds will lift 1 pound.

Cool video though.

12 oz in is .0625 ft lbs

So lets say with 44oz-in servos I can expect 44oz at 1 inch from the rotational axis, perpendicular to the arm?

dereckbc 02-22-2017 02:09 AM


Originally Posted by birdDog (Post 1003888)
12 oz in is .0625 ft lbs

So lets say with 44oz-in servos I can expect 44oz at 1 inch from the rotational axis, perpendicular to the arm?

You are right, had a brain fart of inch pounds to foot pounds. Left a step out of factoring out 16 ounces. My bad. That is why I am an electrical engineer and not mechanical.

birdDog 02-22-2017 02:26 AM

Hell, I'm a journeyman machinist and just learned that. Don't tell my peers.

dereckbc 02-22-2017 03:21 AM


Originally Posted by birdDog (Post 1003892)
Hell, I'm a journeyman machinist and just learned that. Don't tell my peers.

Well heck lets make a deal. You delete your post, and I will delete my post.

birdDog 02-22-2017 10:58 AM


Originally Posted by dereckbc (Post 1003899)
Well heck lets make a deal. You delete your post, and I will delete my post.

lol nah, this post made my morning. [popcorn]


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