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-   -   Wing Loading formula? (https://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66198)

philscho 03-22-2012 11:49 PM

Wing Loading formula?
 
Can anyone direct me where to find the formula for determing the wing loading of a special RC airplane?

Thanks Phil

JetPlaneFlyer 03-23-2012 12:23 AM

weight divided by wing area... pretty simple

NJSwede 03-23-2012 12:32 AM


Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer (Post 862436)
weight divided by wing area... pretty simple

The trick is usually to figure out the wing area...

JetPlaneFlyer 03-23-2012 12:57 AM


Originally Posted by NJSwede (Post 862437)
The trick is usually to figure out the wing area...

it's often quoted in the manufacturers specifications, failing that (for wings with straight taper or no taper): tip chord plus root chord x half of wing span

Larry3215 03-23-2012 09:56 AM


Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer (Post 862441)
it's often quoted in the manufacturers specifications, failing that (for wings with straight taper or no taper): tip chord plus root chord / half of wing span

I think you mis-typed that final operator. Shouldnt that be a X instead?

JetPlaneFlyer 03-23-2012 11:51 AM

Good catch Larry.. yes of course i meant x not /.. I'll correct it

Rodneh 04-08-2012 03:32 PM

A much better indicator for how well a model flys is its "wing volume loading" sometimes called "cubic wing loading". Lots of info on using that measurement in the forums if you do a search.

kyleservicetech 04-08-2012 07:52 PM


Originally Posted by Rodneh (Post 864634)
A much better indicator for how well a model flys is its "wing volume loading" sometimes called "cubic wing loading". Lots of info on using that measurement in the forums if you do a search.

Agreed: Wing cubic loading is much more useful. What would be a decent wing loading on a giant scale model would be so out of line in a back yard flyer, it would not get off the ground.

Rodneh 11-18-2012 02:53 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is a chart to see what the wing volume loading is along with wing loading.

FlyWheel 11-18-2012 03:47 PM

What is "cubic" wing loading? Is this a Bernoulli<Sp?> thing?

Posted via Mobile Device

JetPlaneFlyer 11-18-2012 06:01 PM


Originally Posted by FlyWheel (Post 889316)
What is "cubic" wing loading? Is this a Bernoulli<Sp?> thing?

Posted via Mobile Device

No, nothing to do with Bernoulli;)

Cubic loading takes into consideration the scale effect. 'Normal' wing loading can be confusing. For example a micro model with a wing loading of (say) 12oz/sq ft might fly like a lead brick, whereas a giant scale model with exactly the same wing loading would fly like a feather.

That's because our perception of flying speed is influenced by scale. A giant scale model flying at 20mph looks super slow, but a micro doing the same speed looks fast.

Cubic loading takes into account scale effect so it gives a number that is consistent for planes of any size. For instance if you have a cubic loading of 6 then you know that plane will be capable of slow sedate flying, regardless of size.

Bill G 12-05-2012 02:04 AM


Originally Posted by NJSwede (Post 862437)
The trick is usually to figure out the wing area...

...which is generally exaggerated with ARFs and RTFs. :Q
The AUWs often are understated also.

BBCorvette18 01-07-2013 08:40 PM


Originally Posted by Bill G (Post 891015)
...which is generally exaggerated with ARFs and RTFs. :Q
The AUWs often are understated also.

I'm noticing this now that Im looking into this.

For example the Fun Cub I'm building states that it has

Wingspan: 55 in.
Wing Area: 589 sq. in.
Wing Loading: 9.8 oz./sq. ft.
Fuselage Length: 39 in.
Weight (English): 40 oz.


Now when I measure the wing in real life it's 55x9 which would be 495 sq in. and I would think you would have to subtract the width of the fuselage in the wing area equation.

JetPlaneFlyer 01-07-2013 08:55 PM


Originally Posted by BBCorvette18 (Post 895143)
I would think you would have to subtract the width of the fuselage in the wing area equation.

No, convention is that you include the bit of the wing 'inside' of the fuselage. But you would have to make some deduction to allow for the rounding off of the tips on the cub.

BBCorvette18 01-07-2013 09:35 PM


Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer (Post 895145)
No, convention is that you include the bit of the wing 'inside' of the fuselage. But you would have to make some deduction to allow for the rounding off of the tips on the cub.

Thats the part I dont get on how multiplex is coming up with 589 cause I was using the widest part of the wing and the longest. so you would think the actual area would be less?

sometimes I think its better to not worry about all this stuff and just fly LOL

slipstick 01-07-2013 10:04 PM

It's always possible they're including the tailplane area as well as the wing.

I think there are still a few free flight classes that do that. I guess it's so you can't cheat by building tandem wings and claiming only one of them is the wing and the other doesn't count because it's the tailplane ;).

Steve

Stevephoon 01-08-2013 02:12 AM

I've just started down the path of wanting to understand more on aerodynamics as well. I've just come across this summary of wing loading.

http://www.eastbayrc.org/TimTips/Tim...ingLoading.htm

They go thru the numbers on some Slicks. From RC to real size.

Steve

BBCorvette18 01-08-2013 02:40 AM


Originally Posted by slipstick (Post 895151)
It's always possible they're including the tailplane area as well as the wing.

I think there are still a few free flight classes that do that. I guess it's so you can't cheat by building tandem wings and claiming only one of them is the wing and the other doesn't count because it's the tailplane ;).

Steve

That makes alittle sense will have to bust out the tape tomorrow and see if tye numbers add up.

solentlife 01-31-2013 03:05 PM

So think about this one then ...

Fairly simple on a Cessna / Cub etc. where you have wing + tail area as the total LIFTING SURFACE area supporting a weight ...

What do you do with such as the F16 which has a lifting surface called a FUSELAGE ? in addition to the wing / tail.

:D:D:D:D:D:D

Nigel

JetPlaneFlyer 01-31-2013 05:14 PM


Originally Posted by solentlife (Post 898979)
So think about this one then ...

Fairly simple on a Cessna / Cub etc. where you have wing + tail area as the total LIFTING SURFACE area supporting a weight ...

What do you do with such as the F16 which has a lifting surface called a FUSELAGE ? in addition to the wing / tail.

:D:D:D:D:D:D

Nigel

yeah nothing in life is ever that simple!

Also consider that when you talk about 'lifting area' the tail on a most conventional planes 'lifts' downward. So that's why you dont usually include it in the 'wing area' calc. Arguably in fact, as it has 'negative lift' you would be more correct to deduct it from wing area rather than add it;)

For planes like the F-16 the fact that you project the wings to the centre of the fuselage when working out area takes some account of the lifting area of the fuselage, but it's far from an exact science.

slipstick 01-31-2013 05:59 PM

Not really a problem....you design modern jet fighters using computational fluid dynamics. Crude measures like "wing loading" really don't come into it :).

Steve

kyleservicetech 01-31-2013 07:21 PM


Originally Posted by slipstick (Post 898991)
Not really a problem....you design modern jet fighters using computational fluid dynamics. Crude measures like "wing loading" really don't come into it :).

Steve

A while back, someone calculated the wing loading of a fully loaded full size jet fighter. The wing loading was something like making a frisbee out of a cast iron manhole cover!

BBCorvette18 01-31-2013 10:51 PM


Originally Posted by kyleservicetech (Post 899001)
A while back, someone calculated the wing loading of a fully loaded full size jet fighter. The wing loading was something like making a frisbee out of a cast iron manhole cover!

anything will "fly" if it has enough thrust


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