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Build Log - Avenger electric

Old 11-19-2017, 04:58 PM
  #26  
gramps2361
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Been following along the with your progress looking good. If it would help I could take a ride of over to your old place and check it out. If you can get in touch with the new owners, and let them know. Send me a pm don't want to clog up your build thread.
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Old 11-19-2017, 09:18 PM
  #27  
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Default Horizontal Stabilizer Assembly

Locate and remove the horizontal stabilizer parts from the 1/4" balsa sheet. There will be 2 leading edges, 2 trailing edges, 2 outer tips, and 1 center section. Position them over the plans (don't forget the wax paper!) and pin them into place, then apply CA to the joints.

Measure and cut pieces of 1/8" X 1/4" balsa to reinforce the parts. You don't have to be super careful about being too exact here, as you won't see them when done. Use CA to secure them. Remove the pins, and lightly sand both sides to make sure the reinforcement parts are even with the main framework.

Cut a piece of 1/32" X 6" wide balsa sheet to cover the width of the horizontal stabilizer. Apply a light coat of Sig Bond to the frame and reinforcement, and glue the balsa sheet in place. Use pins or weights to hold in place while the glue dries. When dry, remove the pins, flip the piece over, and carefully trim the excess balsa. Using a sharp X-Acto blade, cut out the "notch" in the center of the center piece through the sheeting. Repeat on the other side.

Locate and remove the two elevator halves from the 1/4" balsa sheet. Position them to locate the hinges (use 3 hinges each side.) Mark the centerline of the trailing edges of the stab, and leading edges of the elevators using your center marking tool. Cut the hinge slots where marked.

Sand the leading edge of the elevators to a rounded shape, and taper the trailing edges of the horizontal stab a bit (the stab is slightly thicker than the elevators). Round the leading edges and tips of the stab, and taper/round the trailing edges of the elevators. Install the hinges and elevators, add some CA, and flex to make sure they move freely.

With the elevators in place, you will now connect them. You have two options here:
Option #1 - bend a piece of 3/32" music wire to fit between the elevators, and use a control horn on one side with the pushrod exiting the side of the fuselage, or,
Option #2 - purchase a 3 1/4" 3/32" control horn from Brodak (part # BH-742). These are intended for C/L planes that use flaps. This will allow you to run your pushrod out the back of the fuselage for a cleaner look. You're going to have to first straighten the arms out. Use a torch to heat the wire at the bends red hot, then straighten the wire and cool by dousing it in water. Do both sides. Now, carefully measure where they will have to be bent to fit between the elevator halves, keeping the welded horn in the notch of the stab. Again, heat the wire with the torch and bend to shape. Make sure the wire ends are even. Check the fit between the elevators - a little wide is fine, as you can cut grooves into the elevators where the wire will sit. Cut the wires to the proper length.

With the elevators even and level, apply a small amount of epoxy to the control horn wire and slide it into position. Make sure no epoxy gets into the hinge gap. When cured, reinforce with Sig Aircraft Pinked Tape (SIGSH226). Cut two small strips and apply around the wire. Use CA to soak through the tape to secure it to the elevators. Again, check for free movement.
Attached Images
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DSC_2838 Horz Stab frame.jpg (606.2 KB, 109 views)
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DSC_2839 bottom sheet.jpg (693.3 KB, 106 views)
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DSC_2840 Horz Stab sheeted.jpg (531.9 KB, 106 views)
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DSC_2846 Control horn secured.jpg (870.9 KB, 111 views)
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Old 11-19-2017, 09:21 PM
  #28  
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Default Vertical Stabilizer Assembly and Joining Tail Feathers

Locate the vertical stabilizers parts A and B, and the rudder on the 1/4" balsa sheet. Pin parts A and B over the plans and glue together. Using a scrap bit of 1/4" balsa, cut the rudder bottom piece so the grain of the balsa runs the long way (horizontally when in place). This reinforces the rudder. NOTE: I cut the piece to the original plans. I have since modified the shape in CAD, because it would not clear the elevators at full up. Either you could not use rudder, or, it would jam up elevator if rudder was kicked in. (I didn't think either of those would end well.) The new shape alleviates that oversight.

Center mark the trailing edge of the vertical stab, and leading edge of the rudder. Mark where you will put your 3 hinges and create slots for them. Sand the LE of the rudder rounded, and install the hinges and rudder, check for free movement, and if okay, apply CA to the hinges.

Join the horizontal and vertical stabilizers by inserting the tab on the bottom of the vert stab into the slot of the horz stab. Check for squareness using a square, and make sure the bottom of the front part of the vert stab is flush with the horz stab. Use CA to glue into place. NOTE: do not glue on the vertical stab top piece yet! It's a lot easier to put that on after you cover the vertical stab.
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DSC_2843 Rudder hinged.jpg (1.52 MB, 109 views)
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DSC_2847 Tail feathers joined.jpg (834.8 KB, 104 views)
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Old 11-20-2017, 12:21 AM
  #29  
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LQQKING GREAT Subscribed

Just a Thought, maybe a cowl from a Kaos might fit your build, that will save a lot of Hassle

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXFMBT&P=7

and maybe a canopy from Tower Hobbies trimmed to fit may save some time and trouble, thats what I do when doing a scratch build, Take care and have fun, Chellie

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXJ934&P=7

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXPMZ7&P=7

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXEBJ9&P=ML
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Old 11-20-2017, 01:20 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by CHELLIE View Post
LQQKING GREAT Subscribed

Just a Thought, maybe a cowl from a Kaos might fit your build, that will save a lot of Hassle

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXFMBT&P=7

and maybe a canopy from Tower Hobbies trimmed to fit may save some time and trouble, thats what I do when doing a scratch build, Take care and have fun, Chellie

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXJ934&P=7

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXPMZ7&P=7

https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXEBJ9&P=ML
The canopy is a cut down SIG canopy, as per the original plans, so I've got that covered (I even ordered two, just in case....)

The cowling shouldn't be too difficult, as it's not too large. I just have to start keeping my eyes open for that right sized bottle. A 2-liter is too big, and a 16oz is too small. I think one of the liter sized bottles that the fancy waters come in will work.
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Old 11-20-2017, 04:11 PM
  #31  
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Default Fuselage Construction

Locate and remove the two fuselage sides (1/8" balsa) and fuselage doublers (lite ply).

Place the two fuselage sides with the upper edges facing each other, and line up the doublers - NO GLUE. Mark what side of each fuselage the doublers will be glued to. This way, you will be assured that you won't make the (irreversible) mistake of making two right, or two left fuselage sides! (Don't laugh, it's happened to the most experienced builders - or so I tell myself )

Locate and remove F2 (ply) and the battery tray (lite ply). Note that the battery tray has one end (which goes towards the front) with two 3mm (1/8") tabs, while the other end (towards the rear) has two 6mm (1/4") tabs. Test fit the tabs of F2 and the rear tab of the battery tray into their slots of the doublers and fuselage (they go through the doublers and into the slots in the fuselage side.) When satisfied, apply a thin coat of 30 minute epoxy to the side of the doubler that goes to the fuselage (remember, one left and one right!) and using the tabs of F2 and the rear tab of the tray, locate the doublers to the fuse. Apply weights to hold the doublers flat in place and remove F2 and the tray (at this time, you are only using them to accurately position the doublers.) Repeat the process to make the opposite fuselage side.

Ready the wing mount blocks (1/8" ply) by gluing one shorter section to one longer section (make two). Use 15/64" drill bits (smooth end) to align the holes accurately, clamp the two pieces together, and remove the drill bits. When the glue is dry, remove the clamps and install 1/4"-20 blind nuts. You will have to drill out the holes to do this. Again, I buy these things in bulk (RTL Fasteners product #610) and prefer these because they have a 1/4" shank and fit the parts nicely without protruding. If you are using this nut, drill out the holes to 19/64" and press the blind nuts in from the side with the longer mount. (If not using that brand blind nut, you'll have to drill an appropriate sized hole. If the blind nut shank is longer than 1/4", you'll have to file the protruding end of the shank down even with the top of the mount.)

Locate and remove the Radio Plate and F3 from the lite ply sheet. Test fit them into their slots in the fuselage doublers. F3 should fit flush to the rear of the battery tray. Now, PRACTICE THIS STEP without glue. (Being an octopus, or having a spare set of hands helps here.) Fit the Radio Tray, F2, wing mounts (flange side down), and battery tray into one fuselage side. Now, carefully line everything up on the other half of the fuselage. I start at the Radio Plate and work my way back. When you can accomplish this with everything fitting tightly into place, take it all apart, and do it again - this time with glue (Sig Bond.) The battery tray will keep things square provided it is fully seated. Use rubber bands to hold things together. F3 can now be glued into place (it slides in from the rear.) Apply a little glue to the joint between F3 and the rear of the battery tray. Put the fuselage UPSIDE DOWN on your building board - it's been designed so the upper edges are flat to assure no warps in the fuselage. Let everything dry completely.

P.S: if you're wondering about my magnetic build board (which I use only for fuselage assembly) it's nothing more than a metal shelf from IKEA, with holders made from 1/4" plywood, laser cut in two pieces and glued together with 4 strong magnets in each base. Designed those myself, had National Balsa make them up for me.

Last edited by Stay Quiet; 11-21-2017 at 04:10 AM.
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Old 11-20-2017, 06:48 PM
  #32  
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Default Fuselage - nose parts

Locate and remove from the 1/8" ply sheet the Nose Gear Rear and Front, F1A and F1B, and the Hatch Hold Down. Test fit F1B and Nose Gear Rear into the slots in the fuselage and doublers. They must fit flush. If any epoxy got into the slots, clean it out, or lightly sand the parts to clear the epoxy blob.

Using 1/8" drill bits through two of the motor mounting holes for alignment, glue F1A and F1B together and clamp. Remove the drill bits after clamping. Do the same with Nose Gear Front and Rear.

When dry, drill the four motor mount holes in F1A/F1B with a 15/64" drill. Press in four 10-32 blind nuts (Great Planes GPMQ3330) from the F1B side. NOTE: the blind nut shanks are 5/16" long, so they will protrude 1/16" from the face of F1A. Make certain the blind nuts fully seat.

Drill out the four Nose Gear Front/Rear assembly holes (the smaller ones in the center) with a 5/32" drill. Install four 4-40 blind nuts (Dubro #606) from the Nose Gear Rear side. Drill the holes in the Hatch Hold Down with the same bit, and install two 4-40 blind nuts (as long as they are pressed in from the same side, it doesn't matter.)

Glue the Hatch Hold Down (tapered end faces forward), Nose Gear assembly (Front towards front) and F1A/B (F1A forward) into their slots in the fuselage and doublers. MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS FULLY SEATED, and use a LOT of rubber bands to hold everything together while the glue dries.

Tape one of the Main LG mounts (1/8" ply) over the Main Landing Gear (Great Planes GPMQ1830 Small 60 Dural Landing Gear) and mark where the holes will be drilled in the gear. Use a 9/64" drill bit and drill the holes. Glue the two Main LG mounts together with Sig Bond, and press in four 6-32 blind nuts (again, sorry, no part number here, I buy in bulk.) The holes in the mounts should be the correct size. If not, drill out as needed to fit the blind nuts. The blind nut shanks should not protrude past the wood of the mounts. If they do, file down flush.
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DSC_2856 marking main LG.jpg (995.7 KB, 94 views)
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Old 11-20-2017, 09:01 PM
  #33  
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Default And then, things went south.....

Had to happen. I went to install the cowl mounting plate to the very nose of the fuselage. Should be simple, tabs fit into cutouts on the fuselage sides.

Oops.

The cowl mount is way to narrow to fit. Hmmm. Checked the CAD file, it was cut properly. Check the original plans, seems to be the correct size. But, the wood just doesn't bend as much at the nose as it's shown on the original plans (which I took my measurements from when drawing in CAD.)

Back to the drawing board, as they say.

After measuring the actual width of the fuselage at the nose, the cowl mount was redrawn in CAD and a full size template printed, cut, and checked for fit. Then, using some 3M Super 77 spray, that template was stuck to a piece of scrap 1/8" ply, and a hand cut part was made. Not too shabbily, either, if I say so myself! That was glued into place (NOTE: updated part will be included in the CAD files at the end - the arched part goes to the top of the fuselage.)

Time to transfer the new dimensions to the vertical view of the plans.

Oops #2.

Now the hatch cover is the wrong shape. Have to redraw that, and I'll be cutting one out by hand when the time comes.

Ah, the beauty of the "live" build progress. You get to see all my mistakes!
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:34 PM
  #34  
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Default Continuing on

The new cowl mount plate is cut and installed. The arc is mounted to the top of the fuselage. Use lots of rubber bands to hold in place until the glue dries.

Reinforcements are added to the rear of the motor mount (F1A/B) and Nose Gear mount (Front/Rear). Use 1/4" balsa triangle stock. Sand the square edge slightly to fit (these are not right angles with the nose pulled in) and glue into place.

With the fuselage right side up, locate F4, F5, and F6 on the lite ply sheet. Use Sig Bond to glue them into their respective slots in the fuselage. Build over the plans to assure there is no warp in the sides.
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DSC_2858 New Cowl Mount.jpg (453.4 KB, 97 views)
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Old 11-21-2017, 07:14 PM
  #35  
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Default Hatch and Canopy

Check the fit of the main landing gear blocks to the doublers. They should fit flush into the slots. Use epoxy to glue them in place.

Measure and cut two sections of 3/8” square basswood to form the servo mounting rails. Glue one into the notches in the fuselage doublers. Temporarily set in your elevator and rudder servos to check the distance, and mark where the second rail will go (it sits on top of the flat area of the doublers, forward of the notch.) Remove the servos and glue the second rail into place. NOTE: design error here. :-( The position of the forward servo mount is directly under the wing mount, which makes it almost impossible to install the servo mount screws. A design correction will be included in the updated CAD files. Meanwhile, I'll figure something out for myself.

Glue the main and sub hatch pieces together. When dry, glue the center hatch spine (1/8” ply) to the hatch (epoxy is preferred for this joint.) The parts are designed to be joined flat on your building board. Make sure the spine is straight up and down, and square to the rear of the hatch.

When dry, drill out the two holes in the hatch to the size of the head of a 4-40 X ½” cap screw. Install two screws into the holes, and use them to locate the hatch reinforcement plate. When the hatch is completed and installed, the heads of the screws will be recessed into the hatch for a clean look.

Locate C1 (1/8” lite ply) and the canopy mount (1/8” balsa.) Glue C1 flush and square to the center spine. Glue the canopy mount to the front of C1. Allow to dry.

The canopy is made from a Sig Bubble Canopy (SIGCS011). Measure 8” from the REAR (pointy end) of the canopy and mark a line straight up and down (use a square to help with the measurement). Cut the canopy at that point – you will use the back portion. Trim 6mm (1/4”) from the bottom edge. (Hint: mark with tape – score with a sharp X-Acto blade, then bend and snap.) Check fit and trim again if needed.

Last edited by Stay Quiet; 11-24-2017 at 12:29 AM.
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Old 11-21-2017, 08:07 PM
  #36  
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Position the canopy on the hatch, making sure it’s straight. Mark the outline of the base of the canopy with a pencil. Temporarily install the hatch/spine assembly and use two 4-40 X ½” cap screws to hold in place.

Round off the side edges of the hatch with a sanding block. Taper the nose down to match the contour of the cowl mount plate. Be careful not to sand the area the cockpit.

Still working out the details of the cockpit interior in my head. I’m using a Freewing F-22 Pilot Figure (Item # FP12420 from Motion RC) and downloaded and printed a set of instruments off the internet. I’ve never done a semi-detailed cockpit interior before, so suggestions on how to carve the seat back and front console are appreciated.
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DSC_2869 Hatch Nose Shaping.jpg (639.0 KB, 92 views)
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DSC_2870 pilot figure.jpg (621.6 KB, 93 views)
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Old 11-22-2017, 04:21 PM
  #37  
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Locate C2 and C3 on the lite ply sheet. Glue them into place on the center spine. Make sure C3 seats fully flush against the spine, and is square to it. Measure and cut 1/16” balsa sheets to fit the upper portion of the spine, C1, C2, and C3. Glue into place.

Lacking any feedback on interiors , I just carved out a console and seat back from blocks of balsa. After gluing into place, I masked off the area outside the canopy and used Aerogloss Balsa Fillercoat to seal all the wood under the canopy. Two coats were applied, with light sanding with fine grit sandpaper after each coat dried. A flat gray paint/primer from a rattle can was used to paint the interior (again, two light coats.) A small “heads up display” screen was cut from a discarded clear plastic container, and installed in a slot cut into the console.

While the paint was drying, I went ahead and finished off the tail of the fuselage by installing a section of ¼” square balsa, sanded to shape, between the trailing edges of the fuselage. Pinch them together with the balsa spacer between them, assure they are true, and apply a few drops of CA. Then, top off the surface with a 1/16” balsa piece cut from scrap, and sand the edges round. Don’t worry, if you opt for the Brodak control horn option, you’ll still be able to access the horn from underneath, as that part of the fuselage does not get sheeted later on.
Attached Images
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DSC_2871 interior paint.jpg (1.01 MB, 85 views)
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DSC_2872 Cockpit detail.jpg (745.8 KB, 88 views)
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DSC_2873 C2 C3 top sheeting.jpg (764.0 KB, 82 views)
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DSC_2874 fuselage tail.jpg (924.1 KB, 87 views)
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Old 11-22-2017, 06:03 PM
  #38  
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Locate F3A on the lite ply sheet. Measure, cut, and glue a length of 1/8” X 3/8” balsa cut from scrap to the bottom of F3A. Use a section of ¼” square balsa to reinforce the joint.

Four Great Planes ¼ - 20 X 2” wing mount bolts (GPMQ4402) are cut down to ¾” long on the threads. I thread the bolts into a ¼-20 nut (blind nut is fine) to mark the distance, then cut and unthread the bolt, which cleans up the threads near the cut.

Use the wing bolts to temporarily set the wing assembly onto the fuselage. Mount the hatch and spine into position using 4-40 X ½” cap screws. Check the fit over the wing and sand down the spine if needed.

Slide F3A onto the rear of C3 and the tab on the spine, which holds in the rear of the canopy/cover assembly. The bottom of F3A should be even with the top of the fuselage sides. Measure and cut a length of 1/8” X ¼” balsa to run between the top notches of F3A, F4, and F5. Slide it into the notches which will hold F3A to the proper angle. When satisfied with the fit and position, CAREFULLY apply a drop of CA to each joint between the balsa and fuselage sides, and each of the joints of the top runner at F3A, F4, and F5. Remove the hatch and spine and wing assembly.

Going to take a bit of a break for the Thanksgiving holiday, and will pick up the build after. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!
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Old 11-24-2017, 03:38 PM
  #39  
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Default Tail Feathers, servos, control rods

Set the tail feather assembly (horizontal & vertical stabilizers, elevators, rudder) onto the fuselage. First, check that they sit perfectly horizontally and vertically. Then, measure from the top corners of F2 (front of the wing mount) to the outer tips of the horizontal stabilizer. Adjust so the distance on each side is equal, then carefully mark the position of the horizontal stabilizer by tracing the outline of the fuselage to the bottom of the horizontal stabilizer. Double check your measurements. If okay, apply 30 minute epoxy to the fuselage where the stabilizer sits, and the rear of F5 where it contacts the assembly. Set the tail feathers in place, checking your position marks, and again check your measurement and adjust if needed before the epoxy sets. Allow the epoxy to cure fully.

Install the Futaba S3004 servos to the mounting rails using servo mounting screws. Make sure the arms clear the inside of the fuselage sides and doublers.

Thread one of the 2-56 stub rods into one end of the yellow inner sleeve of a Sullivan semi flexible (blue) Gold-N-Rod (#505). HINT: the easiest way I’ve found to do this is to chuck the rod into a drill, and use the drill to wind it into the sleeve. If you used the Brodak control horn, assemble a Dubro 2-56 Swivel Ball Link (#367) to the stub rod. Route the outer sleeve through the slot in the middle of F6, into the notch cut out near the upper inside of F3, and to the outer end of the servo arm. Mark the needed length and cut. Next, guide the inner sleeve into the outer sleeve with the swivel ball end connected to the outermost hole in the Brodak horn (some trimming of the 2-56 cap screw is required – use a Dremel cut off wheel, and wear your safety glasses!) Thread one of the links partway onto a stub rod, allowing some adjustability. Clip the link into the second hole from the outermost hole in the servo arm, measure the inner sleeve, and cut to length. Insert the 2-56 stub rod into the inner sleeve and reinstall the clip link.

When connected the swivel ball link to the control horn, use a drop of thread lock on the nut. Use a scrap piece of lite ply to secure the outer sleeve into the notch of F3, and two pieces of scrap balsa to secure it to F6. Use a hot glue gun, or epoxy, to hold the outer sleeve in place at these places.

NOTE: If you are using a regular control horn, you’ll have to determine where the control rod will exit the side of the fuselage after installing the horn, and make similar measurements. You can use a Z-bend on the servo arm, and the clip link on the stub rod for fine adjustment later on.

Use some scrap lite ply and balsa to secure the control rod sleeves at F3, F4, and F6 to prevent excessive flexing.
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DSC_2887 retainers at F4.jpg (720.4 KB, 70 views)
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DSC_2888 retainers at F6.jpg (712.5 KB, 66 views)

Last edited by Stay Quiet; 11-25-2017 at 02:12 PM.
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Old 11-24-2017, 03:41 PM
  #40  
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Default Canopy and hatch turtledeck

Use the cut down canopy to trace the cutout you will need on the hatch covering. Just trace it onto a piece of paper. Then, you can install the pilot figure (epoxy) and canopy (Pacer Formula ‘560’ canopy cement.) Use some masking tape to hold the canopy in place while the cement dries.

Fit the wing assembly to the fuselage, and install the canopy/hatch assembly. You’re going to have to make your own templates for the lower sides of the hatch turtledeck. (I had to make a slight dimensional change to C3/F3A when it was discovered they didn’t fit as well as I had intended them to. Therefore, the lower hatch turtledeck parts I had cut in CAD didn’t fit, either. If someone builds one of these in the future, and comes up with a template that works well, kindly send it to me and I’ll measure and transfer to CAD.)

When happy with the fit, cut 1/16” balsa sheets for the two lower sides. Glue them to C1, C2, and C3. Use a thin (1/2” wide) strip of Sig pinking tape, held in with CA, to reinforce the joint seam from the inside. Add some 1/8” X ¼” balsa strips to reinforce the lower edges. Add balsa filler to the outside of the joints if needed, and sand smooth.
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Old 11-24-2017, 03:42 PM
  #41  
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Default Cowling plug

Glue a piece of ¼” X 3” wide balsa to one long side of a block of 3” X 3” X 6” balsa (I got mine from SIG.) Carefully and accurately cut a section 1 ¼” long from the block. I used a powered miter saw to accomplish this. Locate the templates for the cowling on the 1/8” ply sheet. Glue the rear template to one end of the block (it should fit almost perfectly – the horizontal is the wider dimension, hence the need to glue on the extra balsa.) Allow to dry, then drill a ¼” diameter hole through the block using the center hole in the template. Again, I used a drill press to assure the hole was drilled straight. Use a piece of ¼” dowel through the block and slide the front template (round) over the dowel, and glue to the opposite end of the block. Let dry.

Carve, saw, and sand the block to form the plug for the cowling. You want to keep the tapers smooth, and transition from the rectangular rear template to the circular front. Sand the finished result as smooth as you can using fine grit sandpaper.
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Old 11-25-2017, 02:06 PM
  #42  
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Default Making the cowling

I made my cowl from a 1 ½ liter bottle of Fuji water. (NOTE: on the updated version, which uses a longer cowl, a 2 liter Pepsi bottle was used.) Remove the labels first, using a heat gun – do this while the bottle is full, so the plastic doesn’t shrink yet! Then, empty the bottle and cut at the bottom. There are ‘ridges’ along the bottom – cut at the lower end of the topmost ridge.

Insert the plug you made earlier. It’s a very tight fit! The wider end (rectangular) will fit into the wider ridge if you start at an angle, and then straighten the plug out. Cut about an inch above the top of the plug (circular end) and clamp the dowel in a vise.

This is the first time I’ve tried forming a “soda bottle” cowl. It’s not difficult, especially when the bottle fits the plug almost perfectly to begin with. But, when shrinking the bottle with your heat gun, make sure you have plenty of heat, and stay on one area until it shrinks over the plug. I found that once the plastic bottle shrinks a bit, it doesn’t like to shrink again. When done, trim the front and rear of the bottle flush to the front and rear of the plug. Use a small hammer to tap on the front end of the plug to free the plastic cowl.

Locate the nose ring (1/8” ply) and using the canopy cement, glue it into the nose of the cowl.
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Last edited by Stay Quiet; 01-02-2018 at 02:27 PM.
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Old 11-25-2017, 02:08 PM
  #43  
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Default Lower rear fuselage covering

Measure and cut two sections of ½” triangle stock from the rear “cutout” of the fuselage to the middle of the main landing gear block. Trim the inner edges of the stock around the landing gear blocks and fuselage doubler tabs. NOTE: Yes, I know the stock sticks out too far on the side and bottom. It’s supposed to. You’re going to be sanding a whole bunch of it off to make nice, rounded corners later on.

Starting from the landing gear block, tack in the triangle stock with a drop or two of CA. Allow to set, then work your way back, tacking in place as you go. When you get to the end (past F6) glue the rear of the stock even with the inside edge of the fuselage side. Go over all joints and seams with either CA or Sig-Bond and let dry.

Lay a piece of 1/16” X 4” X 36” balsa on the building board, and position the bottom of the fuselage over it with the rear of the landing gear block even with the front edge of the balsa sheet. Use a sharp pencil and trace along the inside edge of the triangle stock as far as you can. Mark the rear of the fuselage at the inside edge of the fuselage sides to provide a reference point to continue the line where you can’t get the pencil in under the tail.

Remove the fuselage and extend the lines from where F6 was to the rear reference marks you made, then carefully cut out the fuselage bottom along the lines you drew. Check the fit inside the triangle stock, marking where the triangle stock ends at the rear of the fuselage (the covering ends at that point, so cut the sheet off at that point.) Sand as needed for a good fit.

I highly recommend using both Velcro strips and a Velcro strap to hold in the two 3s battery packs that will power this bird. Sorry, no part number on the strap as I have a few of them lying around, and none of them have any markings on them, but they are available online (a lot of RC cars and trucks use them.) Slide the strap through the side slits of the battery tray, making sure the strap is the correct way to allow you to strap in the batteries. If you don’t do this now, good luck trying to get it into place once the bottom is sheeted! You’ve been warned!

Measure and cut a piece of ¼” square balsa to fit behind the landing gear block, and glue it to the rear of the block and sides of the fuselage. It should be flush to the landing gear block and provides a place for the front of the covering to be glued to. Use a piece of 1/8” X ¼” balsa across the rear of the fuselage where the covering ends and glue into place. Apply Sig-Bond to the bottom of the strips you just installed, as well as the bottom of F3, F4, and F6. Install the fuselage bottom and make sure it sits up against the formers and strips. Use a drop of CA along the edges of the triangle stock and bottom sheet. Use some 1/8” X ¼” balsa to make additional reinforcements across the bottom sheeting on the inside of the fuselage, and glue into place.
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Old 11-25-2017, 02:10 PM
  #44  
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Default Covering top turtledeck

There are no laser cut parts for the rear turtledeck sheeting. Each piece is measured and cut from 1/16” balsa sheet. Cut a bit oversized, and trim / sand as needed to fit. You’ll use two pieces on each side. Make a cutout for the rudder control pushrod sleeve, and cut the ends of the sheeting flush to the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer. You’ll carve a section of balsa block to form the ends at the tail later. Use Sig Aircraft Pinking Tape and CA (or Sig Bond) to reinforce the seams from the inside. Fill any gaps with balsa putty (I use Hobbico Hobbylite balsa colored filler - #HCAR3401) and let dry thoroughly, then sand smooth.

Measure and cut/carve/sand two blocks of balsa to finish the rear turtledeck over the horizontal stabilizer.
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Old 11-25-2017, 07:57 PM
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Default Parts delay

Before I can begin sheeting the forward section of the fuselage and cowl, I have to mount the motor, install the ESC, and the arming switch.

The motor is spaced out with #8 X 1/2" diameter motor spacers from Heads Up RC (part # D-695). I use the 1/4" long spacers, drilled out for a #10 socket head cap screw, and one end countersunk to clear the end of the 10-32 blind nut that protrudes 1/16" from the end of the motor mount. All one has to do is thread the 10-32 X 1" socket head cap screw through the motor mount of the Power Up 46 Sport 620kv outrunner brushless motor (HURC #K-505), through the spacer, and into the blind nut.

Oops. Seems all I have is 10-24 screws, and they don't work very well. :-( Ordered up what I need from RTL Fasteners (because Lowes and Home Depot don't carry fine thread, it seems) and wait.

In the meantime, I may as well cover the wing assembly. I'm not going to tell you what scheme to use, or what covering, or how to apply it. There are dozens of YouTube videos on covering by people much better than I am at it. Still have to cover the ailerons and flaps (after removing the control horns) but the main wing is done, and the optional armament (missiles) installed. (Missiles are BT-5 Estes model rocket tubes left over from the wing build, with balsa fins glued on and nosecones from Estes. Mounts are included in the CAD files.)
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Last edited by Stay Quiet; 11-26-2017 at 04:49 AM.
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Old 11-26-2017, 01:46 AM
  #46  
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Looking good and coming along!
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:48 PM
  #47  
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Ditto on the looking good. Did you make the missiles yourself, or did you have these laying around?
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:00 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by gramps2361 View Post
Ditto on the looking good. Did you make the missiles yourself, or did you have these laying around?
Just bought a nosecone assortment for the BT-5 tubes. I just freelanced the fins out of balsa, and some imagination.

The mounts are on the lite ply sheet. Eight mount reinforcement strips (curved to fit the mounts, which just happen to be a perfect match for the airfoil shape when the front edge is even with the rear of the main spar - gotta love CAD design!) are on the 1/8" balsa sheet. I just glued one reinforcement to each side of the mount where it glues to the wing, so instead of a 1/8" contact area, I have 3/8". They weigh next to nothing, and although I'm sure they add some (minimal) drag, I think they just belong.
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:10 PM
  #49  
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Default Nose gear linkage

The nose gear (Dubro #152) steering block is bolted to the nose gear bulkhead with four 4-40 X 1/2" cap screws and included washers (you could use the included screws, but I prefer socket head cap screws to those tightened with a screwdriver.) I connect the nose gear steering arm to the servo with one of the threaded 2-56 rods, with the threaded end cut off. A Z-bend connects to the steering arm. You'll have to remove the arm and insert the Z-bend, then reinstall the arm. Slide the coiled nose gear rod through the block and steering arm. Don't tighten the locking screw yet.

On the servo arm, I use an E-Z Connector (Dubro #121) without using the locking screw. Install a locking collar (I use a Dubro 1/16" collar, drilled out with a 5/64" bit), and a spring from your average retractable ball point pen. Slide through the E-Z connector, add another spring and locking collar. The collars and springs can be adjusted to center the steering arm in the middle of its throw at straight ahead position.

I used this setup on the RCM Advanced Trainer I built, and it works better than anything else I've ever tried. It keeps the steering working, but allows for some give in case your nose wheel catches a rut in your runway. The tension on the springs can be adjusted with the locking collars for more or less free play.
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Last edited by Stay Quiet; 11-27-2017 at 07:52 PM.
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Old 11-28-2017, 03:33 AM
  #50  
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Default Finishing the lower fuselage

Finish the lower front half of the fuselage in the same manner as the rear – ½” triangle stock and 1/16” balsa sheeting. When installing the triangle stock, start tacking it in at the main landing gear block using CA, and gradually bend and tack against the fuselage side towards the front. Measure and cut the 1/16" balsa sheet to fit and glue into place (use a piece of scrap balsa glued to the front of the main landing gear block to attach the rear of the sheeting to.) When done, sand the triangle stock down to the rounded corners.

Use a 5/32” drill bit, by hand, through the nose gear block and drill through the bottom sheeting for the wire gear. Using four 6-32 X ½” cap screws ( I buy bulk from RTL Fasteners – Product # 253, bag of 24) attach the main landing gear. NOTE: you can wait and cover the entire fuselage later if you wish. I’m still held up on motor mounting until my 10-32 cap screws arrive, so I covered the bottom of the fuselage (I normally do the bottom first, then sides, then top when I apply covering.)
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