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free-flight timer

Old 03-17-2012, 07:01 AM
  #1  
Air-on
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Default free-flight timer

I place this question here after my searches came out empty. Please, does anyone know about timers for free-flight electric planes?
thank you guys and gals for your help!
Air-on
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Old 03-17-2012, 07:25 AM
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How long should the motor run on a free flight?
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:29 AM
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hayofstacks
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You can set a timer on most newer radio's. I have my dx6I setup to run a timer on the throttle cutoff button. It also reads higher then the timer is set, or you can set it to zero and that should run it as a stop watch.
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by hayofstacks View Post
You can set a timer on most newer radio's. I have my dx6I setup to run a timer on the throttle cutoff button. It also reads higher then the timer is set, or you can set it to zero and that should run it as a stop watch.
I think he means a timer on the plane to cut of the motor or activate elevators to stall the model ..

Many Free Flighters in old days used literally a thermal fuse or clockwork timer. The fuse would burn through, or clockwork would wind down and then model would either soar or have elevator activated to stall the model and float down.

Timer on a Tx is not what I think he was after ...
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Old 03-17-2012, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by solentlife View Post
I think he means a timer on the plane to cut of the motor or activate elevators to stall the model ..
Actually the entire stab is popped up at a 45* angle or more. This puts the plane into a "super" stall and it comes straight down in a level position

Originally Posted by solentlife View Post
Many Free Flighters in old days used literally a thermal fuse or clockwork timer.
Old days? We still do. There's nothing like the smell of burning DT fuse in the morning to a free flighter

New stuff is electronic and multi-fuctional simulating the clockwork Selig timers with control for DT,stab incidence for climb and glide ,rudder offset and so on.


For timers look here once: http://www.texastimers.com/
He has a variety of DT timers and is working on a new electric timer

These guys are in UK :http://www.ffelectronics.com/index.htm
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Old 03-17-2012, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Leadchucker View Post
Actually the entire stab is popped up at a 45* angle or more. This puts the plane into a "super" stall and it comes straight down in a level position



Old days? We still do. There's nothing like the smell of burning DT fuse in the morning to a free flighter

New stuff is electronic and multi-fuctional simulating the clockwork Selig timers with control for DT,stab incidence for climb and glide ,rudder offset and so on.


For timers look here once: http://www.texastimers.com/
He has a variety of DT timers and is working on a new electric timer

These guys are in UK :http://www.ffelectronics.com/index.htm
Hi ... I'm actually ex UK and cut my model teeth on Free Flight and C/L ...

I posted in a simple way, but appreciate your post wording it better and the links. I've been so long away from those tissue / stick and fuse days .... I was a young teenager then .. now 56yrs old !
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Old 03-17-2012, 06:31 PM
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Default electronic motor cutoff

Originally Posted by solentlife View Post
Hi ... I'm actually ex UK and cut my model teeth on Free Flight and C/L ...

I posted in a simple way, but appreciate your post wording it better and the links. I've been so long away from those tissue / stick and fuse days .... I was a young teenager then .. now 56yrs old !
Thank you all, I've read about "dethermalizers" back in the day (57 now), when learning English while reading and re-re-re-reading old second-hand MAN, Scale Modeller and any magazine I could lay my hands on down in brazil.
Solentlife got it right though: I seek to design a modern, electronic version of the old fuse to have fun with my grandchildren;
Ideally, it would have a one-touch button start, and be programmable or, for cost sake, pre-programmed for running times of say, 5, 10 and 15 seconds.
My goal is to have a small depron plane (wingspan around 40 cm), and wingload enough to carry a simple gearbox and 2 or 3 AAA batteries.
Any suggestions on a suitable propeller size (and general, well-meaning ol human ingenuity) are most welcome!
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:39 PM
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There's a lot of discussion of electric powered free flight models on the Hip Pocket forums at http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/...oard,20.0.html

You'll find several designs for very cheap simple motor timers and links to many commercial ones.

BTW these days nearly everyone uses Lipo batteries and motor timers. You can then usually get 5 or more flights per charge of the battery.

Steve
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:34 PM
  #9  
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Default I think of other kids...

Originally Posted by slipstick View Post
There's a lot of discussion of electric powered free flight models on the Hip Pocket forums at http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/...oard,20.0.html

You'll find several designs for very cheap simple motor timers and links to many commercial ones.

BTW these days nearly everyone uses Lipo batteries and motor timers. You can then usually get 5 or more flights per charge of the battery.

Steve
Steve, I will check the link, thank you.
The idea of using "a couple" AAA batteries has to do with this: I want to give one of these planes as a gift to my friend's son. I cannot however either afford to make it that high-tech to give out nor expect the father to foot the bill, if you know what I mean.
I will love if I can manage to design something with the right wingload to carry this "booster". How many flights per pair of batts? tests will show - but I want to try and make it! Little Malakhi will go crazy!
Aharon
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Old 03-18-2012, 03:35 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Air-on View Post
Thank you all, I've read about "dethermalizers" back in the day (57 now), when learning English while reading and re-re-re-reading old second-hand MAN, Scale Modeller and any magazine I could lay my hands on down in brazil.
Solentlife got it right though: I seek to design a modern, electronic version of the old fuse to have fun with my grandchildren;
Ideally, it would have a one-touch button start, and be programmable or, for cost sake, pre-programmed for running times of say, 5, 10 and 15 seconds.
My goal is to have a small depron plane (wingspan around 40 cm), and wingload enough to carry a simple gearbox and 2 or 3 AAA batteries.
Any suggestions on a suitable propeller size (and general, well-meaning ol human ingenuity) are most welcome!
Air-on
This sort of thing is quite easy to do with the little microcontrollers such as www.microchip.com. I've used many of them, and one good one is the PIC18F13K50. This unit can be directly programmed to connect directly to any standard model airplane servo. On power up it will run the servo to the extreme "Counter Clockwise" direction. On pushing one of the buttons, it will time out in 5, 10 or 15 seconds (or pick a value) and run the servo to the opposite position and stay there. You could have up to 8 buttons, each with its own accurate to one percent time delay. (http://search.digikey.com/us/en/prod...2FP-ND/2021357)

Circuitry is extremely simple, with components including the microcontroller, three push button switches and three little resistors for 5, 10, 15 seconds or what ever time you need. They can be programmed to provide time delays from a few dozen microseconds to seconds, to minutes, to hours to weeks. Just made up one to kill a gasoline engine after exactly 20 minutes of running time. The servo connects directly to the microchip output. It would operate on 4.5 to 5.5 Volts DC.

The switches could be those little push on shorting blocks often used in computer motherboards.

This will require you to locate someone with a microchip programmer such as the PicKit 3, available in the USA for about $40 USA. For the cost of everything, www.digikey.com has both the PicChips and the programmer in their inventory. The weight of the microchip and circuit board would be on the order of 10-15 grams or so. Probably much less if you can find a smaller prototype circuit board.

I could write up a program for this project if you want to go this way.
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Old 03-18-2012, 07:35 AM
  #11  
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Default Wow man!!!!

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
This sort of thing is quite easy to do with the little microcontrollers such as www.microchip.com. I've used many of them, and one good one is the PIC18F13K50. This unit can be directly programmed to connect directly to any standard model airplane servo. On power up it will run the servo to the extreme "Counter Clockwise" direction. On pushing one of the buttons, it will time out in 5, 10 or 15 seconds (or pick a value) and run the servo to the opposite position and stay there. You could have up to 8 buttons, each with its own accurate to one percent time delay. (http://search.digikey.com/us/en/prod...2FP-ND/2021357)

Circuitry is extremely simple, with components including the microcontroller, three push button switches and three little resistors for 5, 10, 15 seconds or what ever time you need. They can be programmed to provide time delays from a few dozen microseconds to seconds, to minutes, to hours to weeks. Just made up one to kill a gasoline engine after exactly 20 minutes of running time. The servo connects directly to the microchip output. It would operate on 4.5 to 5.5 Volts DC.

The switches could be those little push on shorting blocks often used in computer motherboards.

This will require you to locate someone with a microchip programmer such as the PicKit 3, available in the USA for about $40 USA. For the cost of everything, www.digikey.com has both the PicChips and the programmer in their inventory. The weight of the microchip and circuit board would be on the order of 10-15 grams or so. Probably much less if you can find a smaller prototype circuit board.

I could write up a program for this project if you want to go this way.
Dennis, I am moved by your reply. Thorough, to the point, wow! "Zero BS Level", thank you!
I guess the only remaining is, which direct drive motor is used? outrunners?
I am actually scavenging motors and gears from CD-Rom drivers, cheapo chincko dvd players and putting them together (I will post a picture when I get home from work).
As we say here, you are "mashu mashu" (a great guy).
Thanks!
Aharon
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Old 03-19-2012, 02:26 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by Air-on View Post
Dennis, I am moved by your reply. Thorough, to the point, wow! "Zero BS Level", thank you!
I guess the only remaining is, which direct drive motor is used? outrunners?
I am actually scavenging motors and gears from CD-Rom drivers, cheapo chincko dvd players and putting them together (I will post a picture when I get home from work).
As we say here, you are "mashu mashu" (a great guy).
Thanks!
Aharon
Thanks

As far as the CD Rom and DVD motors, been there, done that. Even the best of these type motors can not come close to the power to weight output capability of a cheap brushless motor from China.

The brushless motors designed for model airplanes have heavier copper windings, and much more powerful permanent magnets.
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Old 03-19-2012, 03:35 PM
  #13  
Air-on
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Default I'm doubly thankful

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
Thanks

As far as the CD Rom and DVD motors, been there, done that. Even the best of these type motors can not come close to the power to weight output capability of a cheap brushless motor from China.

The brushless motors designed for model airplanes have heavier copper windings, and much more powerful permanent magnets.
I remember your patience and good advice back (not long ago) when my airviruses hit me again, this time for good I hope.
Yes, I bought my first outrunner for 80 shekels (less freight! ) - that's about $21. Before you gasp rembember: this is the Middle East! "A far, far away land", hahaha! (and yet it is home to a tribe that is free and brave).
We are also creative, but I take your points seriously. Not reinvent the wheel.
I "dig" scavenging high-end trash, matching motors with sprockets and generally having fun with my grandchildren around me.
I would like to educate myself on the current practice of freeflight, both electric and rubber, but above all kids-oriented (i.e. "introductory to the sport").
Depron as a building material has a charm of its own, do you agree? how about a thread to share specifically building techniques with this material, with clear indication of the design goal: scale, trainer (how many channels), free flight, 3D (urgh! abbberrratttionnnn), motor recommended size, etc.

Cheers,
Aharon

Last edited by Air-on; 03-19-2012 at 03:37 PM. Reason: underover destrunkating misfiring newrrohns
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Old 03-19-2012, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Air-on View Post
Before you gasp rembember: this is the Middle East! "A far, far away land", hahaha! (and yet it is home to a tribe that is free and brave).
Cheers,
Aharon
Yeah
Some 10 years ago I traveled on business to Mexico City to put on a training school on our circuit breaker controls. Forgot to bring an RA232 serial cable with me. It took 4 hours, hitting just about every electronics shop around before finding a shop that had one.

(Now, everythings all USB!)
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