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DIY soldering jig

Old 01-29-2018, 06:20 PM
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solentlife
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Default DIY soldering jig

I look around and I see Soldering Jigs - but never understand why many are metal or CF based ...

Great for soldering up those LiPo plugs !! NOT !!

So a scrap block of wood ... drill a few holes and glue in various plugs / bullets etc. so you :

a) Have a solid and steady holder of the item to be soldered by plugging it into the ones glued to the board.

b) Wood is a good insulator - so no problem of shorting a battery etc.

c) The plug you are soldering is held by its 'mate' and no deformation due to overheating ...

d) Use those old plugs etc. as the ones to glue to the board.



Nigel
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Old 01-30-2018, 10:56 AM
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Don Sims
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Great idea Nigel. Does that type of glue melt from the heat?
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Old 01-30-2018, 12:02 PM
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Plus the anodized aluminum blocks being marketed are just giant heat sinks.
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Old 01-30-2018, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Don Sims View Post
Great idea Nigel. Does that type of glue melt from the heat?
Yes of course if held too long.

I reckon if you are melting the glue - you are overheating the items ...

If you are like me - moderate solder skills - then I did think of heat resistant epoxy as used on exhaust pipes etc.

But so far all is well .... puts up with my hamfisted ways .

Nigel
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Old 01-30-2018, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by birdDog View Post
Plus the anodized aluminum blocks being marketed are just giant heat sinks.
I just cannot see why they make something like this in metal ??

Nigel
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Old 01-30-2018, 11:56 PM
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I use Forceps or a long nose vise grip, and a small hobby torch. Works great.
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:29 AM
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Two of these.

https://www.harborfreight.com/helping-hands-60501.html


I put a few pieces of shrink tubing over the one used to position insulated wire.
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Old 01-31-2018, 01:52 AM
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Originally Posted by solentlife View Post
I just cannot see why they make something like this in metal ??

Nigel
The "wooden" approach like the photo you provided, had been used by the local TV/Radio repair shops around here in the 1960's thru the 1980's, when tube/transistor units were still economical to repair and get a few more years of life out of..........Really not a "novel" or a new idea.......but certainly shows creativeness and thinking outside the box.

You're on point......if the wood or "adhesive" start to smoke, more than likely the soldering application is hotter than need be to provide a good soldering join....!

I have seen carbon fiber/graphite applications used in the auto industry for such.......but not any "metal".......more than likely a "conductivity" and insulation issue/liability, outside of Al composites using alloys......tend to be quite expensive.

Last edited by pizzano; 01-31-2018 at 02:10 AM.
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Old 01-31-2018, 05:18 AM
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Originally Posted by birdDog View Post
Plus the anodized aluminum blocks being marketed are just giant heat sinks.
Actually a heat sink is extremely useful and desirable when soldering. It speeds up the cooling process which sets the solder quickly and most importantly takes the heat away from the wire preventing the insulation from melting and/or deforming.
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Old 01-31-2018, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by dereckbc View Post
Actually a heat sink is extremely useful and desirable when soldering. It speeds up the cooling process which sets the solder quickly and most importantly takes the heat away from the wire preventing the insulation from melting and/or deforming.
Having had the Nov 5th / July 4th display when I soldered a battery using the vice without my usual wood plates .... I can forego the heat sink !!

Nigel
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by dereckbc View Post
Actually a heat sink is extremely useful and desirable when soldering. It speeds up the cooling process which sets the solder quickly and most importantly takes the heat away from the wire preventing the insulation from melting and/or deforming.
Haven't soldered many bullet connectors have ya?
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Old 01-31-2018, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by birdDog View Post
Haven't soldered many bullet connectors have ya?
Been soldering for over 40 years both professionally and hobby. Just takes the right heat source. I use a small hobby torch and either forceps or long nose vice grips. Even have a wet rag to wrap around the wire insulation and cool down the terminal real fast. That is why they make soldering heat sinks. However there is too much of a good thing and an aluminum block qualifies as to much of a good thing.



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Old 01-31-2018, 03:19 PM
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Please guys .... this is WF !!

Nigel
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Old 02-01-2018, 03:00 AM
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Owning multiple electric irons, which I get tired of cleaning, I think it's time to pick up and give a micro torch try
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Old 02-01-2018, 06:04 AM
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dereckbc
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Originally Posted by birdDog View Post
Owning multiple electric irons, which I get tired of cleaning, I think it's time to pick up and give a micro torch try
They work great and after you use one you will never go back to irons. Just google Hobby Torch. Or go to a Head Shop and/or Ganja Dispensary.

Something else that you might consider is looking at what kind of solder you use. There is solder, and there is solder. Stay away from Lead Free Solder, and I know Europeans frown on that statement. Reason is real simple, takes a lot higher temperature and will damage wire insulation. Leave that stuff to plumbers, or use with solder on clevis to metal rods. Its stronger, but just to much heat required. Whatever you do, DO NOT use Acid Core or Acid Flux on anything electrical.

There are two types or alloys to consider.

1. 63/37 Rosin Core, or or even better is multi-core rosin solder. 63/37 is a Eutectic Alloy (183 degrees C) which means is has a very sharp transition from liquid to solid state at 183 C. Where as 60/40 has a plastic stage, transition from liquid to solid, and any movement before it solidifies will cause the dreaded cold solder joint. 63/37 has superior wetting and flow characteristics. Easiest to work with.

2. My favorite is 62/36/2 or 62% tin, 36% lead, 2% silver. It is stronger and lower resistance. The heat is a little higher at 217 degrees C. Like wise it has a sharp transition from liquid to solid. Down side is it is more expensive.

Personally I hate solder connections. They are banned in Automotive, Marine, Aircraft, Aerospace, Utilities, and NEC (National Electrical Code). Well NEC does have an exception for old wire and tube wiring providing the mechanical and electrical connection does not depend on the solder. Solder connections are very weak, high resistance, and prone to failures. They are inferior to compression terminals in all aspects. Not sure why RC hobbies are still using solder connections, but that is a topic for another thread.

FWIW in my mind there is only one solder manufacture Kester 24-7150-0018. Element 14 also makes a good product.

Last edited by dereckbc; 02-01-2018 at 11:27 PM.
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Old 02-01-2018, 06:04 AM
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Originally Posted by solentlife View Post
Please guys .... this is WF !!

Nigel
Huh?
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Old 02-01-2018, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by birdDog View Post
Owning multiple electric irons, which I get tired of cleaning, I think it's time to pick up and give a micro torch try
I own a Propane torch ... it can braze / hard solder ..... amazing little unit.

When I have a bullet that defies iron - a blast with the torch and its all over !

One excellent use - it heats up rod to red hot ... brilliant for enlarging control arm holes.

It only cost me about $10 from Banggood I think.

Nigel
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Old 02-01-2018, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by dereckbc View Post
Huh?
Just a nice reminder that WF is a nice place and before anyone gets 'upset'.

Nigel
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Old 02-01-2018, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by solentlife View Post
I own a Propane torch ... it can braze / hard solder ..... amazing little unit.
Not a full sized torch, a small hobby torch.




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Old 02-01-2018, 03:31 PM
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Nice idea Nigel! I use a couple of wood clothes pins opposite each other hot glued to a flat piece of plywood. Simple and effective. Will get a pic and put up tonight
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Old 02-01-2018, 04:09 PM
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solentlife
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Heres my Propane Torch ... fills from standard Lighter Gas canister ...





It does not have a metal tip like the 'gas soldering irons' though ... but its flame is narrow and concentrated ...

Nigel
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Old 02-01-2018, 11:29 PM
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Originally Posted by solentlife View Post
Heres my Propane Torch ... fills from standard Lighter Gas canister ...

It does not have a metal tip like the 'gas soldering irons' though ... but its flame is narrow and concentrated ...

Nigel
Looks like it should work if you can adjust the flame. I do have several irons, but those are used on circuit boards. But for RF and battery connectors, torch only. So much easier, faster, and clean. No blobs or spikes. Just clean and shinny. Takes some practice, not as much as an iron. Trick is low flame forming a pencil point, and only get it close enough to do the job. No need to let the flame touch what you are soldering.
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Old 02-02-2018, 01:14 PM
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solentlife
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i have just printed of a jig that when I saw it online - thought was a bit too smart ... but I gave it a try ...

The 3d print actually instead of printing parts separately - printed as one including the working pivots !!

Nigel
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Old 03-12-2021, 04:56 PM
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Hi....I wonder if it make a difference whether one solders with the connectors oriented vertically so the cup of the connector faces up and let solder collect within the cup of the connector compared to soldering with the connectors and wires oriented horizontally?

how to order pcb online

Last edited by HadriaGuy; 04-02-2021 at 12:19 AM.
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