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Building Board?

Old 01-13-2006, 01:25 AM
  #1  
fabricator
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Default Building Board?

Untill now I have only done ARF's, but I just picked up a great planes Ryan Sta ep, so I am about to jump into building with both feet but I need to know the most basic thing, what makes the best building board?
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Old 01-13-2006, 02:20 AM
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Sky Sharkster
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Default Building Board

To Fabricator, the best boards I've found are 2' x 4' accoustic ceiling tiles from "Lowes" or Builders Square". About 2-3 bucks each. They don't like to break open the packs (usually 10 or 20) so if you can find an open pack just grab a couple and buy'em.
They take pins easily but you may need to inset a small "cutting board". maybe 6" square of harder material near the front for the inevitable chopping and trimming. The tile is too soft to make a good cutting surface.
Make sure the bench is flat, the tile will follow any warps which will then get built into your flying surfaces!
Good Luck, Ron
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Old 01-13-2006, 02:34 AM
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... what he said... I usually screw the tile down with #8 flathead screws to prevent it warping over time. I have used these tiles for 25 years or more, still haven't seen anything better.
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Old 01-13-2006, 03:00 AM
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Thanks guys I love a reason to head over to lowes.
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Old 01-13-2006, 03:04 AM
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I had enough room to build a 4' x 4' x 1/2" plywood top that has a 2" x 4" bracing under it to stop ANY hint of warps.
Over time I have changed the top bulding surface to many types of materials.
I had used a very hard, closed foam cell, sheet for years. Anything will work.
Had a old school cork board. Fair.
You should ask what to use to protect the kit plans from becoming a glued mess as you work over them. Some plans have you build each 1/2 of the wing over the same printed place.
Simple me, still uses Waxpaper.
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Old 01-13-2006, 03:15 AM
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ForestCam
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Best building board? Dad, my two brothers and myself have built a lot of planes on an old piece of 1x8 redwood plank. Flat as a (ahem) board, pretty easy to put pins in but nearly impossible to find nowdays.
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Old 01-13-2006, 02:59 PM
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Hey now,
How 'bout that, I working on a Ryan too. I build on a hollow core door with accoustic ceiling tiles as a pin board. With this I can build up to eight foot long sections without fear of warps. When the door gets too messed up, I flip it over. Works very well.
RobII
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Old 01-13-2006, 03:46 PM
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Yep. The door. With the tiles. When the tiles get worn you take em off and replace them. We use gorilla shelving as the bases. Almost can't get the wood to build a bench for what the gorilla shelves cost and you have automatic storage. You can use a chop saw to make the benches the height you need too if you need customer length.
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Old 01-13-2006, 04:16 PM
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34Ford
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Anyone here old enough to remember homosote? It was the black board used on the outside of houses prior to laying brick.

Nice thing about it was it came in 4 x 8 sheets for those BIG wings.
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Old 01-13-2006, 04:48 PM
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When my brother moved into his house there must have been 10 sheets of Homosote he was going to throw it out but I got my hands on it. So I have plenty to last me for awhile I have a solid wood door on a nice six foot table under that. I did have a nice piece of thick glass but the wife dropped something on it and cracked it
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Old 01-13-2006, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by turnwaldw View Post
When my brother moved into his house there must have been 10 sheets of Homosote he was going to throw it out but I got my hands on it. So I have plenty to last me for awhile I have a solid wood door on a nice six foot table under that. I did have a nice piece of thick glass but the wife dropped something on it and cracked it
Just keep it good and flat the best you can. I used a solid wood door one time to build a Big Hots wing. 81" x 24" x 4" thick wing. Never flew the thing after I built it.

I dont know if you can still buy it, do you?
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Old 01-13-2006, 05:41 PM
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turnwaldw
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I dont know if you can or not I havent really looked for it though as much as I am lowes and home depot lately(honey do list). I have a machinest table that I bought when a local machine shop went out of business I check my door from time to time to make sure its flat. The thing weighs a ton or I would have it in the house to build on it besides the wife dont want that nasty thing in the house.
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Old 01-13-2006, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by 34Ford View Post
Just keep it good and flat the best you can. I used a solid wood door one time to build a Big Hots wing. 81" x 24" x 4" thick wing. Never flew the thing after I built it.

I dont know if you can still buy it, do you?
I'm in the construction industry and often work with roofers, the type who install flat rubber roofs, anyway there is a material they use as an underlayment called fesco board that is pretty much identical to homosote, it comes in various thickness, you could probably get it from a commercial roofing company very reasonably.
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Old 01-14-2006, 05:35 AM
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Originally Posted by 34Ford View Post
Anyone here old enough to remember homosote? It was the black board used on the outside of houses prior to laying brick.

Nice thing about it was it came in 4 x 8 sheets for those BIG wings.
You can still get Homosote at lumber yards. I use that bonded to 3/4 particle board. I have a Starrett straight edge and particle board always checks dead flat.
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Old 01-14-2006, 10:39 AM
  #15  
ragbag
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Originally Posted by Sky Sharkster View Post
To Fabricator, the best boards I've found are 2' x 4' accoustic ceiling tiles from "Lowes" or Builders Square". About 2-3 bucks each. They don't like to break open the packs (usually 10 or 20) so if you can find an open pack just grab a couple and buy'em.
They take pins easily but you may need to inset a small "cutting board". maybe 6" square of harder material near the front for the inevitable chopping and trimming. The tile is too soft to make a good cutting surface.
Make sure the bench is flat, the tile will follow any warps which will then get built into your flying surfaces!
Good Luck, Ron

I vote for the door and the acoustic tile.

My door is screwed down on a layout bench that I used to build furnture on, so the door stays flat. Hollow core doors will bend and give if they are not on a solid surface.

I do use two layers of tile though. When I use the T pins I don't want to hit the door (hurts my thumbs), so I have two layers of acoutic tile duct taped together. Built several planes before I had to flip it over to the clean side. Keep a piece of 5/8" cabinet grade ply about 10" x 10" for cutting and pounding on. A second handy for drilling. Cabinet grade is smoother, not rough like standard ply's.

After you cover a couple of planes you will have all the plans protection you need fron the backing on the covering.

By George
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Old 01-14-2006, 11:05 AM
  #16  
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If you already have a bench setup, I ordered a couple of balsa building boards from http://www.guillow.com/ about 30 bucks but a real nice level board to work from.

Mike
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Old 01-15-2006, 03:14 PM
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Something you might want to consider, especially if you want to get into building models on a regular basis is a magnetic building board system. There are a few offered by companies but these in my opinion are not worth the price and the quality is low. Buying a piece of flat metal (I bought a piece two feet by four feet one eighth inch thick, galvanised for twenty five dollars) is easy and can be found at many places that fabricate various products like cabinets and duct work. Magnets of the right size can be found online for a very reasonable sum also. I really like the system and it offers several advantages over typical pin and board styles.

To get a really nice overview of how it all works take a look at www.airfieldmodels.com. This site has a really good explanation of the system as well as a wealth of information on building model aircraft.

Bob
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Old 01-15-2006, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Thermal View Post
Something you might want to consider, especially if you want to get into building models on a regular basis is a magnetic building board system. There are a few offered by companies but these in my opinion are not worth the price and the quality is low. Buying a piece of flat metal (I bought a piece two feet by four feet one eighth inch thick, galvanised for twenty five dollars) is easy and can be found at many places that fabricate various products like cabinets and duct work. Magnets of the right size can be found online for a very reasonable sum also. I really like the system and it offers several advantages over typical pin and board styles.

To get a really nice overview of how it all works take a look at www.airfieldmodels.com. This site has a really good explanation of the system as well as a wealth of information on building model aircraft.

Bob
Hmmmm....As my user name implies I work with sheets of steel every day and could get a piece that size for...............uh very little I checked your link and find that very interesting, I think I'm gonna try it.
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Old 01-15-2006, 05:14 PM
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I work in metal too, but one of the reasons for pins is to hold down those stubborn pieces that want lay flat. No?
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Old 01-15-2006, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by 34Ford View Post
I work in metal too, but one of the reasons for pins is to hold down those stubborn pieces that want lay flat. No?
Yes, you put the magnets on top of the pieces to pull them against the steel plate.
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Old 01-15-2006, 11:30 PM
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If you look at the site posted previously you will see how some have overcome pieces that won't lay flat. By making magnetic levers you can do it easily. You could make almost any type jig with magnets and solve most of the problems inherent in building.

Bob
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