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quick battery question

Old 12-12-2009, 07:19 PM
  #1  
brown.jacob.p
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Default quick battery question

i have this battery from my cessna 182 skylane. i plan on building my own plane in the future and i didnt want to have to buy a whole new battery just to fit the new esc. what is the name of the plug on the battery below? (the red plug not the charging lead) i need to find an esc that will fit the battery below.

http://secure.hobbyzone.com/search/HCAA3840.html

thanks
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Old 12-12-2009, 07:40 PM
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Terry.0132
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I am sure you will get lots of replies with different advice. But I think the common one will be to remove that plug and fit a Deans plug. If that plug works on your Skylane, then see if you can find an appropriate male connector with a feamale deans on the other side. ( OOPS, going back to your original question I do not know the name for that connector)
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Old 12-12-2009, 08:18 PM
  #3  
Heli Jim
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Picking an ESC is not a matter of finding a plug that matches., You need to match
the ESC to the voltage and amp draw for the particular motor that you are going to
use.
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Old 12-12-2009, 08:25 PM
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looks like a E3 like e flight use but i wouldnt say 100% you should switch to deans there better thats all I use. and the other guy is right get a esc that matches your set up don't go by what will plug in, if you decide on what plugs in your going to end up in trouble
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Old 12-13-2009, 03:40 PM
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Walt Thyng
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Whatever the brand the plug is simply a set of barrel (not sure that's the right name, it's early) connectors in a unitized holder. Once you know the size you can purcase matching ones for your other equipment.
Walt
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Old 12-13-2009, 05:04 PM
  #6  
brown.jacob.p
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thanks for the help. yes im aware that the esc has to match the power of other electronics, its just i was having trouble finding one that would plug into this battery. anyways, its no big deal, i could buy a new battery.

thanks again
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Old 12-13-2009, 07:07 PM
  #7  
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If you're not willing to change the plugs on things to match whatever you decide to standardize on you're going to really limit your choice of equipment and you'll almost certainly spend LOADS more money than you need to .

Steve
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Old 12-13-2009, 07:32 PM
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Heli Jim
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You can either swap out the plugs on your battery and ESC, or if you don't want to do that, you could make up some adapter cables with plugs and sockets to match up.

Much easier to just re-solder on what you want to use. Deans seem to be the connectors of choice by most modelers. If you don't know how to solder, check around--there must be another modeler in your area with an iron.
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Old 12-19-2009, 02:34 AM
  #9  
Old Sloppy
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That connector appears to be an "Align" brand connector.

Harry

P.S. I prefer a "Deans" connector myself.........
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Old 12-24-2009, 03:22 AM
  #10  
brown.jacob.p
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hmm i see.

just out of curiosity, is there a reason the deans plug is better or is it just because it is the most popular?
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Old 12-24-2009, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by brown.jacob.p View Post
hmm i see.

just out of curiosity, is there a reason the deans plug is better or is it just because it is the most popular?
There are a few others as good or better, it is just that the Dean's are a very good compromise between size and low conductivity as well as being polarized which gives some degree of safety if you always keep the female connector on the hot side (voltage source side) and prevents connecting with the wrong polarity.
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Old 12-25-2009, 11:40 PM
  #12  
Old Sloppy
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The Deans plug has a rating of 70 amps.
I like Deans,
they are easy to plug in and/or remove,
available at all Hobby Shops,
they are easy to solder & heat shrink,
they have modest resistance levels,
they are easy to "shine up" keep the connection surfaces clean,
and they look good too.
This will cover a lot of applications, but not all.

I do not know the Align plug rating
(best I can recall 60 amps) but I do not recall......for sure.
I believe these are more difficult to clean the contact surfaces,
of course you could use chemical cleaners (acids) but you still gotta rinse and dry them afterwards.

This is a steady amp rating, peak amps will be higher.

I have a FE boat that draws 104 amps, peaks will be higher I know.
(maybe twice as high)
I use Schulz 5.5 mm gold plugs, rating is 200 amps steady.
and of course peaks will be higher...

Harry
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Old 12-26-2009, 04:45 PM
  #13  
Red Scholefield
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Originally Posted by brown.jacob.p View Post
hmm i see.

just out of curiosity, is there a reason the deans plug is better or is it just because it is the most popular?
It's popularity may have something to do with people feeling it is better,
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Old 02-13-2010, 11:31 PM
  #14  
brown.jacob.p
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when a battery "peaks" does that mean youre at full throttle?
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Old 02-15-2010, 02:46 PM
  #15  
Matt Kirsch
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No.

"Peak" is a term used for NiCd and NiMH batteries. It is the moment that the battery reaches maximum charge.

The reason it is called a peak is because if you keep charging a NiCd or NiMH battery after it "peaks" the voltage will actually start going DOWN.

LiPoly batteries do not peak, though some people still refer to the point where a LiPoly becomes fully charge as "peak."

Proper LiPoly chargers stop charging when each cell holds a voltage of approximately 4.2 Volts. However, if you use the wrong kind of charger, the voltage will continue to rise and rise and rise until the battery overloads.
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Old 02-19-2010, 12:07 AM
  #16  
Old Sloppy
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Originally Posted by Matt Kirsch View Post

Proper LiPoly chargers stop charging when each cell holds a voltage of approximately 4.2 Volts. However, if you use the wrong kind of charger, the voltage will continue to rise and rise and rise until the battery overloads.

When the battery overloads it will generate a gas that causes the cells to swell up or puff.
This results in a bad cell that cannot be reversed.

Harry
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Old 02-19-2010, 10:18 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by brown.jacob.p View Post
when a battery "peaks" does that mean youre at full throttle?
Unfortunately "peak" is used for many things. One alternative is as it was used in post #12. I.e. a very short term high value. E.g. motors often show continuous current up to 20A, PEAK current 30A for 10 or 20 seconds, batteries are sometimes shown as 20C batteries but 30C peak.

It's usually best to take the continuous values and ignore any peak value given. I tend to read it as "a current you just might get away with for a few seconds without everything dying...if you're really lucky" .

Steve
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Old 02-21-2010, 03:41 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by slipstick View Post

ignore any peak value given. I tend to read it as "a current you just might get away with for a few seconds without everything dying..." .

Steve
STEVE IS RIGHT.
However some folks flirt with the "peak" values all the time, this gets really expensive real fast.

Harry

Last edited by Old Sloppy; 02-21-2010 at 03:41 AM. Reason: spelling correction
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