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R/C Pilots having a defibrilator implant

Old 06-04-2011, 10:42 PM
  #1  
Crasher
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Default R/C Pilots having a defibrilator implant

Gentlemen; my electric R/C flyer friend just received a defibrilator implant and his doctor gave him a warning about using certain electric power tools. He never thought about asking that doctor about flying R/C electric powered model aircraft using 72mhz RF frequency! He will ask this question, however, on his next doctors visit. I would like to get the Watt Flyers thoughts on this topic if you have any before he sees his doctor. Regards, Crasher
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:53 PM
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gramps2361
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Instead of waiting he should call the office and get the answer over the phone, or at least a return call later that day from the DR. or someone that is covering him even on the weekend there is a covering if the Dr. is not on for himself.
Hate to screw around with a answer for that question here, but darn good point in bringing this up. I never would of thought of radio interference to a defibrillator that would be one hell of a way to get shot down if it can happen.
John
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Old 06-05-2011, 04:32 AM
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dumo01
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As John said he needs to talk to his doc specifically about his circumstances, maybe to the point of taking his transmitter with him to a follow up to talk about potential interference.
The other issue they should talk about is how symptomatic he gets if a shock is delivered. If he is flying when the defib goes off will he still be able to control the plane, or does he go down, waking up to try to find where the plane went down. This might be similar to if he has any driving restrictions.

I copied the below from the manual for one of the implantable defibs on the market: it may or may not apply to him and his individual circumstances.

Hope things work out well for him

2.7 Home and occupational environments
Cellular telephones This device contains a filter that prevents most cellular telephone
transmissions from interacting with device operation. To further minimize the possibility of
interaction, instruct patients to take the following precautions:
● Maintain a minimum separation of 15 cm (6 in) between the device and the cellular
telephone, even if the cellular telephone is not on.
● Maintain a minimum separation of 30 cm (12 in) between the device and any antenna
transmitting above 3 W.
● Hold the cellular telephone to the ear farthest from the device.
This device has been tested using the EN 4550222:2008 and ANSI/AAMI PC-69:2007
standards to ensure compatibility with cellular telephones and other hand-held transmitters
with similar power. These transmission technologies represent the majority of cellular
telephones used worldwide. The circuitry of this device, when operating under nominal
conditions, has been designed to eliminate any significant effects from cellular telephones.
Electromagnetic interference (EMI) Instruct patients to avoid devices that generate
strong EMI. Electromagnetic interference may result in delivery of unneeded therapy.
Electromagnetic interference may also cause device malfunction or damage. The patient
should move away from the EMI source or turn off the source because this usually allows
the device to return to its normal mode of operation. EMI may be emitted from the following
sources:
● high-voltage power lines
● communication equipment such as microwave transmitters, linear power amplifiers, or
high-powered amateur transmitters
● commercial electrical equipment such as arc welders, induction furnaces, or resistance
welders
Home appliances that are in good working order and properly grounded do not usually
produce enough EMI to interfere with device operation. There are reports of temporary
disturbances caused by electric hand tools or electric razors used directly over the implant
site.
Carefully evaluate the possibility of increased susceptibility to EMI and oversensing before
changing the sensitivity to its minimum (most sensitive) setting of 0.15 mV.
Electronic article surveillance (EAS) Electronic article surveillance equipment, such
as retail theft prevention systems, may interact with devices and result in inappropriate
therapy delivery. Advise patients to walk directly through an EAS system and not remain
near an EAS system longer than necessary.
Static magnetic fields Patients should avoid equipment or situations where they would
be exposed to static magnetic fields greater than 10 gauss or 1 mT. Static magnetic fields

may suspend tachyarrhythmia detection. Sources of static magnetic fields include, but are
not limited to, stereo speakers, bingo wands, extractor wands, magnetic badges, or
magnetic therapy products.
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Old 06-05-2011, 06:09 AM
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tobydogs
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7 year with a medtronics deffrib and never received a shock once,have been flying RC 3 years now.

i used to worry at work if i was near high voltage equipment or transformers.

I'm looking forward to what the doc tells him but as for my holding the transmitter,its always held against my belly and i hardly turn my body when flying ....i just seem to fly without thinking of how I'm holding the TX that way......a shock at full blast would feel like solid punch in the chest. my guess is loss of control would be highly probable

not having felt it ,thats what i'v heard it feels like.
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Old 06-06-2011, 04:46 AM
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FlyWheel
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You say he flies 72MHz? Most of the pacemaker warnings I have seen are regarding cellular and microwave devices Likwe ovens). If I were him I'd worry more about his flying buddies "shooting him down" with their 2.4GHz stuff, it's almost on the same frequency range.
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Old 06-08-2011, 07:22 PM
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dumo01
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Got back an email from a friend who works for Medtronic Pacing Division:

Hi Dave,
It's unlikely that the transmitter would cause any problems, but I am enclosing the official Medtronic Stand on Radio transmitters.....That being said, it still comes down to the proximity of the transmitter to the device. Medtronic ICD's use true bipolar sensing, so the signal needs to be REALLY strong to have an effect. Take a look and let me know if there are any questions.
Thanks,
john

I took a look but did not find a spec for the power output for an RC transmitter, my guess is it is low, but I do not know really
Attached Files
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Old 06-08-2011, 07:45 PM
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sparky1963
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If I use my DX6i within 20 feet of my car, it usually sets the alarm off but is fine at greater distances.

Just did some Googling and the question of Tx power was raised on another forum.
DX6i transmit power: USA 200mW, Europe 100mW. (User-selectable from the menu, apparently, so you could maybe drop it down to 100mW...).
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Old 06-10-2011, 01:20 AM
  #8  
giflyrc
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I have a defribulator and my Dr.being familiar with RC equipment said it should not pose a problem and yet he recommended not holding the antenna in close contact with the implant (just to cover his butt)

My radios are 2.4 gig and I have not had any problems!

Roger aka GIFLYRC
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Old 06-10-2011, 01:36 AM
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kyleservicetech
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Originally Posted by Crasher View Post
Gentlemen; my electric R/C flyer friend just received a defibrilator implant and his doctor gave him a warning about using certain electric power tools. He never thought about asking that doctor about flying R/C electric powered model aircraft using 72mhz RF frequency! He will ask this question, however, on his next doctors visit. I would like to get the Watt Flyers thoughts on this topic if you have any before he sees his doctor. Regards, Crasher
Two of my fellow club members are equipped with defibrilator implants, and both have been flying kerosene type turbine jets. Zero issues during the past two years.

(Before getting his implant, one of those members had a major heart attack while flying his turbine. Got it back on the ground OK, fellow members gave him oxygen, nitroglycerin pills, and got an ambulance)

As always, check with your doctor.

Last edited by kyleservicetech; 06-10-2011 at 02:02 AM.
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Old 06-11-2011, 05:00 AM
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FlyWheel
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Originally Posted by giflyrc View Post
I have a defribulator and my Dr.being familiar with RC equipment said it should not pose a problem and yet he recommended not holding the antenna in close contact with the implant (just to cover his butt)

My radios are 2.4 gig and I have not had any problems!

Roger aka GIFLYRC
I guess as long as you heart doesn't start doing reverse immelmans <Sp?> you should be OK...


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