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Maiden flight today

Old 12-31-2006, 05:59 PM
  #1  
kfrisbee
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Default Maiden flight today

I have been wanting to fly for years but one thing or another has kept me from it. On Christmas my daughter gave me an ATF biplane which I thanked her for and went right to the hobby store and traded it for the Super Cub. I did no research before the purchase but from what I am reading here, it seems that I made a good choice for a first plane.

I have a couple of choices for my first flight area; the ten acre pasture right in front of my house or the big open space at the local middle school... My dilemma is this. The pasture is on a slight incline so I am a little bit concerned about take off and landing, but the school yard is over 10 miles away.

Probably the biggest reason for my fear of flying in the pasture is that a year ago I bought a really inexpensive ducted fan jet RTF thinking "how hard can it be?", launched it over the pasture, watched it climb, watched it bank to the right, watched it go into a verticle dive and watched it plow right into the ground. The impact of the crash crushed the nose badly and damaged the electronics so that the rudder no longer worked. The ten seconds that the plane was in the air gave me a feeling that I will never forget and I am looking forward to hours of that feeling...

Any suggestions on the location for the first flight? ...Oh, the grass in the pasture is very very short, should I attempt a ground take off or a hand launch when I get up the nerve to do this?

Thanks for the great site!
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Old 12-31-2006, 06:24 PM
  #2  
sgomes
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I recommend the pasture. No problem with the incline, just hand launch - easier that take offs anyway. Then, just belly in on the landing. You may even want to leave the main gear off completely - might save a prop or two.

Lots of Luck.

Steve
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Old 12-31-2006, 07:45 PM
  #3  
kfrisbee
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Default Wooohooo!!!!

Oh yeah! That's what I'm talkin' about!

I decided on the pasture (thanks Steve) and went through both batteries with nothing broken, ok almost nothing. I have a couple of nicks in the prop and the front of the cowling is broken but nothing that will keep me on the ground!

Now I am waiting for the batteries to recharge and I am back at it.

It's funny... I read and read all of the great tips for a beginner like keeping the plane upwind, but until I got it downwind I didn't quite get it.

Well, I am going back out to learn some more!

Ken
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Old 12-31-2006, 10:04 PM
  #4  
johnnyz
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Sounds good, tell me how you like that super cub. I'm thinking it would respond better than my sky fly, but I have to try some stronger line first to see about improved response.
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Old 01-01-2007, 12:29 AM
  #5  
kfrisbee
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Thumbs up

Johnny, the Super Cub is perfect for a first time flyer. I can't speak for any other plane though.

Today was the best day that I have had in many years. I am truly thankful that the super cub is so forgiving both in the air and during abrupt landings, hehehe. Lets see, I got my cub stuck 60 feet up in an oak tree (that took an hour to rescue), I broke the cowling and was able to repair it with duct tape, I broke one propeller (getting it out of the tree), I learned how to land successfully (OK, I had 3 good landings), I learned how to recover from a steep dive and I now feel somewhat comfortable handling the cub.

I am amazed that the wing held up as well as it did. The only things that cost me money today was the cowl ($2.99) and a propeller (a couple of bucks at the most).

I highly recommend this plane to anyone that is just starting!

Ken
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Old 01-01-2007, 12:49 AM
  #6  
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Well I'd say you had some awesome flight time. Good for you. Keep at it. I'm going to get a super cub myself. I've been flying (sort of) 2 channel aircraft so I can get in the air. I'm learning a lot about trimming for a straight glide etc. The folks at Wattflyer is a great group to be with.

Bruce
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Old 01-01-2007, 01:02 AM
  #7  
firemanbill
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Congrats Ken! Nothing like a succesful maiden to get your blood flowing!

Glad it worked out good for you! It sounds like you are well on your way!
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Old 01-01-2007, 02:50 AM
  #8  
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Congratulations Ken!

Sounds like you are pumped up now. Way to go.

Tom
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Old 01-07-2007, 06:26 PM
  #9  
cyclonetoy
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Dear sir,I am very happy to read ur article.It's very good for u playing airplane.but in my opinion,u'd better learn some knowledge such as :how to operate the airplane easily;how to repair it once the airplane was crashed,etc.i think u will fly success next time!Good Luck!



Originally Posted by kfrisbee View Post
I have been wanting to fly for years but one thing or another has kept me from it. On Christmas my daughter gave me an ATF biplane which I thanked her for and went right to the hobby store and traded it for the Super Cub. I did no research before the purchase but from what I am reading here, it seems that I made a good choice for a first plane.

I have a couple of choices for my first flight area; the ten acre pasture right in front of my house or the big open space at the local middle school... My dilemma is this. The pasture is on a slight incline so I am a little bit concerned about take off and landing, but the school yard is over 10 miles away.

Probably the biggest reason for my fear of flying in the pasture is that a year ago I bought a really inexpensive ducted fan jet RTF thinking "how hard can it be?", launched it over the pasture, watched it climb, watched it bank to the right, watched it go into a verticle dive and watched it plow right into the ground. The impact of the crash crushed the nose badly and damaged the electronics so that the rudder no longer worked. The ten seconds that the plane was in the air gave me a feeling that I will never forget and I am looking forward to hours of that feeling...

Any suggestions on the location for the first flight? ...Oh, the grass in the pasture is very very short, should I attempt a ground take off or a hand launch when I get up the nerve to do this?

Thanks for the great site!
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Old 01-07-2007, 09:21 PM
  #10  
radioflyer75
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Congrats on the maiden flight. I just took my SC out for the 2nd flight, and did good for the most part, until time came to land.
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Old 01-07-2007, 09:28 PM
  #11  
stinkweed007
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KFriz... you have a hobby in your future..!

Now get your spare parts in order... props.. nose cowlings.. an more batt's..

And above all get someone to take a pic of it all..!!

Get good and go back for that Bip!!

Welcome Up!!
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Old 01-08-2007, 07:41 AM
  #12  
BobbyDog
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Congrats Kfrisbee!! We all love to hear of a Virgin pilot because it reminds us all of our first time. I can still remember my first "successfull" flight like it was yesterday. Now you should make the plunge and save up for a good kit sport plane along with outrunner and lipo. The difference in the fun factor goes up by 10. Either way great job and welcome to the club!!

Bobbydog
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Old 01-08-2007, 09:12 AM
  #13  
Don Sims
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Congrats on that first successful flight! The SC sure seems like a great beginners plane!
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:20 PM
  #14  
Fuzzy
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I just purchased the Super Cub and couldn't be happier with my first plane i have a E-Flite blade cx helicopter but this is so much more fun, my first flight was awesome and i am surprised at how durable it is
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Old 04-30-2007, 09:57 PM
  #15  
backdraft310
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Congrats on that first successful flight! I just bought a cub about 6 weeks ago 10 good flyes and 2 bad not a bad record i think it's a great plane can't say anything bad about it
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Old 04-30-2007, 10:41 PM
  #16  
Fuzzy
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i cant find any clubs around my small town and dont know of anyone else that into the hobby witch is making it harder for me to lean how to fly
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Old 04-30-2007, 11:05 PM
  #17  
backdraft310
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I am from Maine and same thing up here not many clubs. You can learn on your own it just takes a bit of time like i said i have 12 flights so far and doing well just 2 misshapes not much damage to the plane it takes Patience don't lose the flying bug yet it's to early for that give it a chance when people tell you that you need someone to teach you how to fly I'm not so sure about that anymore with planes like the cub it makes it easy so hang in there

Last edited by backdraft310; 04-30-2007 at 11:08 PM. Reason: bad gramer
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Old 04-30-2007, 11:26 PM
  #18  
Fuzzy
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ya i will i am actually charging up my second battery right know to go out and fly
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Old 04-30-2007, 11:37 PM
  #19  
backdraft310
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there ya go i wish i could fly to day but the wind grounded me oh well
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Old 05-01-2007, 03:26 AM
  #20  
Fuzzy
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well i learned 1 lesson today never every forget your sunglasses when going to fly (only had some cowling damage)
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Old 05-01-2007, 04:30 AM
  #21  
Saucerguy2
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As long as you are having fun, that's all that matters, I wrote the following in another forum, thought I'd post it here to help you guys new to flying. It's a little long winded, but covers what goes on in your mind for successful flights:

This isn't meant to replace any of the must reads for new pilots, I just wanted to share some tips within the mindset necessary for successful flights. I'm self taught and having made just about every mistake under the sun teaching myself to fly RC, I gotta clear out misconceptions and address the proper mindset and understanding those new to this will eventually adopt.

As a new pilot, you'll likely have people telling you to get one of those cheap toy planes, typically in the 30-40.00 range in order to get your feet wet. This isn't meant to give you an exact feeling for flying "real" rc, and in fact, many of these are harder to fly then the real mccoy, especially in the wind. The biggest reason for that is the lack of power, the toy planes are "just" engineered with enough power to get it in the air without alot of reserve if any at all. This is entirely for economic purposes and as you progress into RTF and ARF packages, you'll find much of the time, the supplied power system is just barely adequet, this is why most of us ditch the stock motor's right off the bat knowing a plane without enough power is alot harder to fly then one with enough, similar to riding a bike without enough forward momentum, the toy planes are meant to teach orientation.

Trim and getting the proper COG is going to be your first obstical to overcome and here is where you have to override natural instinct and follow protocall. There is a ton of threads and posts about this so I won't go over procedures specifically, but the idea is to force it to fly weather it want's to or not. On the outside, it may appear that the pilot is fully in control and the plane is just flying itself, taking note as to the stick barely being moved. In reality, the pilot is countering the planes natural tendacy's to veer off course and a more experienced pilot will be able to nip it in the bud before it even starts, yet you'll find as a new pilot, you are going to be working those sticks much harder just to maintain level flight, don't pannick, it only takes a short time and a few flights to feel in control. It's similar to if you ever have driven your car, and be it ice, or trying to avoid a sudden obstruction, you over steer, only to have to counter, back and forth in a rather scary manner, "I had that happen once after picking my car up from the shop, the air was very low in one of the tires, I ended up doing a 180". This is why everybody tells you to get something slow, it may be called slow in comparison to other planes on the market, but might as well be a jet fighter in the hands of a new flyer, trust me on this one, you will thank yourself for starting with what everybody is reccomending for this very reason, an added element is to help build your confidence, this as opposed to starting out with something fast where you get used to failure rather then success, it's difficult to break yourself from the latter mindset once you have failed consistantly enough. If it's radically out of trim, you'll know when you attempt to launch, land it, get your bearings back, make the trim revisions necessary, manually on the plane if possible, and relaunch. One of my last flights for example is a new design I'm developing, it's alot of trial and error since it's my own design so can only guess as to how it's going to behave with every revision I've put in place. The latest revision includes a more advanced wing design, this is to push my skill level foward, but I did have to land it just after launch since the trim was too far off, it was a struggle to get it level, then get it to gain some altitude, then to lose that height due to it needing more trim then could be overcame manually so wasn't able to get that valuable 50-100 feet in the air necessary to fine tune the trim.

Those that still insist upon buying planes too advanced for their skills should place the planes in their hanger as a reward for when they are ready to move up to the next stage, if you want to challenge yourself, "after" you have consistantly been flying your slow plane well, try it in a little wind, make it stall 100' in the air and recover, see how many loops you can do in a row, etc. You'll likely be wrecking from time to time going this route, but you'll at least be challenging yourself in preperation for the next stage of flying, of which you'll likely do all of the above inadvertently. 99.9% of the time I crash is because I'm making the plane do things it's not designed for, being into the building end of this heavily helps so I don't really mind rebuilding what ever gets mangled, and in fact, I look forward to it, and looking at my small collection that's collecting dust through the winter, am a little dismayed because they are all flight ready and I'm not wanting to tear the gear out of them for other planes until I've made one unflyable which will have to wait for spring.

Something else to keep in mind, being a new hobbiest, even if you have experience building those little free flight balsa kits, building RC is a completely different animal in many ways and for the most part, it's about torque and G's the airframe is enduring well above and beyond any free flight plane. I think we all look back at our original creations and laugh, knowing our skill levels needed revision and just made it harder on ourselves learning how to fly a bird that's less then perfect. You'll want to get the feeling for how it's going to react in the air, does it have play, are the lines straight, do the tail feathers kinda flap around, or are they solidly mounted, what about how solid is the wing mounted? You'll be suto simulating it in flight while it's in your hands, it's better to address these issues while it's on the ground since once it's in the air, there is no room for correction and you are going to be at the mercy of any discrepency. Case in point, I picked up an ARF cheap from this guy, after receiving it, he told me he has no building experience but put this one together and wrecked it, this was something I really noticed after testing it out. Their was only so much I could do to fix it without essentially rebuilding most of it from scratch, regardless even though I wasn't 100% happy with it, I took it up. The elevator stuck in the upward position upon launch, it went straight up, inverted and straight down behind me, nosed into a spectacular crash and from the furthest section on the wing saddle foward, there simply was nothing left, I wished I had this on video, I even impressed my girlfriend with that one, she called it the coolest crash she's ever seen, I called it a dumb mistake and I knew better, but hey, we only live once and I don't take alot of pride in ARF's personally, entirely because I prefer to build my own from scratch, but hey that's just me. The point here, don't be overconfident with something that's in less then perfect shape, those little discrepencies will come back to haunt you and you have enough to worry about without having to add more elements of surprise on your plate.

Your first successful flights will be an adrenelin rush, this is normal and if it's not, you are really taking baby steps forward which is fine, but if you find on your 3rd flight, you are still on the edge of your seat, chances are likely you are trying to fly something too advanced for your skill level. This is where you gotta think, is it worth crashing this plane or do you really want to just push yourself forward to move onto the more advanced designs more quickly, then again, if you are like me, I like that little rush and is why I tend to push my planes past what they are designed for. There is alot to be said about taking it slow, once you have moved on past the trainers, you simply won't enjoy them as much so you end up with dust collectors. Remember when I mentioned "force it to fly" this is where you have to adopt the mindset that you are in control, you are flying the plane, it's not flying you and when it try's to malfunction, you just have to think in your mind "no you don't" and make your course corrections quickly, again, this is where all of the above ties together and if all you are doing is bobbing around the sky in a futile attempt to make it fly straight and level, chances are likely you are trying to fly something either too advanced or not properly assembled.

Final note here, these are toy's, you are going to crash, rebuild, replace, and get back in the sky. When you destroy your plane, don't lose any sleep over it, it just gives you another excuse to hit the LHS or your favorite online retailer, this may be considered a hobby, but I feel is more of a sport at times and there are plenty of formal competitions proving it in that manner.
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Old 05-01-2007, 11:06 PM
  #22  
Fuzzy
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Thanks for the Advice i really Appreciate it
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Old 05-05-2007, 02:02 PM
  #23  
wgregoryl
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kfrisbee - what brand "super cub" are you referring to? Thanks
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Old 05-05-2007, 02:28 PM
  #24  
Solid Hit
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Park Zone Super Cub. It comes complete with transmitter and all radio equipment installed. Just charge your battery and go.
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Old 05-05-2007, 02:50 PM
  #25  
herk_1
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HobbyZone not Parkzone
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