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1940 Scientific Mercury

Old 02-03-2012, 04:41 AM
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coachman
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Cool 1940 Scientific Mercury

Hello,

I recently completed an electric Scientific Mercury kitted in 1940, six years before I was born Amazingly better than 80% of the wood in the kit was still in usable condition. It always surprises me how such a large model, with a 6 foot wing span, can come out of such a small box LOL

Frank
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:53 AM
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kyleservicetech
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Originally Posted by coachman View Post
Hello,

I recently completed an electric Scientific Mercury kitted in 1940, six years before I was born Amazingly better than 80% of the wood in the kit was still in usable condition. It always surprises me how such a large model, with a 6 foot wing span, can come out of such a small box LOL

Frank
That must have been a lot of little bitty pieces. Reminds me of a Piper Cub I built from scratch some 12 years ago. Way, way to many pieces
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:18 AM
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Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
That must have been a lot of little bitty pieces. Reminds me of a Piper Cub I built from scratch some 12 years ago. Way, way to many pieces
Beautiful model and yes I can see there were more than a few pieces of lumber involved The worst part on the Mercury was all the parts were printed on the wood and some were quite faded making cutting them out interesting, to say the least. I couldn't help but wonder how my father, an avid modeler before and after WWII, managed to build kits like this with only a razor blade and Ambroid cement.

Frank
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by coachman View Post
Beautiful model and yes I can see there were more than a few pieces of lumber involved The worst part on the Mercury was all the parts were printed on the wood and some were quite faded making cutting them out interesting, to say the least. I couldn't help but wonder how my father, an avid modeler before and after WWII, managed to build kits like this with only a razor blade and Ambroid cement.

Frank
That brings back memories, Ambroid cement. The stuff that for me, warped just about every balsa joint I made.

Nowdays you've got epoxy, CA, Titebond or that yellow carpenter glue, and a few other types of adhesives. A lot of my stuff is glued together with Titebond glue. Works well, is actually a bit lighter than CA (by actual test), and is nearly as strong as epoxy. Epoxy is generally the 30 minute stuff when used in high stress areas.
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
That brings back memories, Ambroid cement. The stuff that for me, warped just about every balsa joint I made.

Nowdays you've got epoxy, CA, Titebond or that yellow carpenter glue, and a few other types of adhesives. A lot of my stuff is glued together with yellow carpenter glue. Works well, is actually a bit lighter than CA (by actual test), and is nearly as strong as epoxy.
Carpenters glue was the only glue, aside from epoxy, that worked on the mercury. I tried to use CA but the wood was so dry it just soaked up even the thick CA. Soooooo I went back to what worked in the good old days.....pre-glue every joint with carpenters glue, let 'em dry then glue the parts together. The only difference between Ambroid and carpenters glue...............carpenters glue doesn't smell up the whole house LOL
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