RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros Discussion all about rc radios, transmitters, receivers, servos, etc.

Spectrum 2.4GHZ range test

Old 03-07-2006, 02:53 PM
  #1  
Rodneh
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 753
Default Spectrum 2.4GHZ range test

2.4 GHZ test 7 March 2006
Using the new Spectrum 2.4GHZ radio system, we made the following test. Equipment was installed in a small Ugly Stick powered with a brushless motor.
First, the operator stood about 20 feet from a 20 X 12 foot building covered with corregated aluminum. Someone holding the airplane walked completely around the building while exercising all controls. Control was constant with out even a glitch with the building between the transmitter and plane.
Next, the plane was walked out to an estimated 1/4 to 1/3 mile (you could not even see the plane) but--using walkie talkies for varification--the transmitter operator had complete control of all functions. These test gave us high confidence in using this equipment on our models.
Rodneh is offline  
Old 03-07-2006, 08:55 PM
  #2  
Celtic-Griffin
New Member
 
Celtic-Griffin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Norway
Posts: 2
Default

Has the Spektrum equipment been cleared for use in Europe?
Celtic-Griffin is offline  
Old 03-07-2006, 09:44 PM
  #3  
Vintauri
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Mankato MN
Posts: 152
Default

Thats encouraging. I assume you also did test with the motor running at those distances? I would be great to see just how far they will go.

Steve
Vintauri is offline  
Old 03-07-2006, 09:56 PM
  #4  
TimOBrien
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 57
Default

I was at an electric meet in Orlando a couple of weeks ago and talked with a guy there who is flying one in a ducted fan e-jet. He said that his very fast plane can get out to a speck with still solid control.

I'm sold.... gotta get one and a couple of extra receivers!
TimOBrien is offline  
Old 03-07-2006, 10:15 PM
  #5  
catfight
Anything with Air
 
catfight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 21
Default

I bought extra rx's from heliproz.com for $55 ea. a month or so ago. Good service :0)
catfight is offline  
Old 03-07-2006, 10:29 PM
  #6  
sxates
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 12
Default

I've really like my DX6 so far as well. Only downside is the receivers are kinda expensive compared to standard 72mhz stuff. Oh well--it's worth it
sxates is offline  
Old 03-07-2006, 11:20 PM
  #7  
ragbag
Super Contributor
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,344
Default Cost?

My Hitec 555 and Electron 6 cost about the same or more depending on where you get them from, after you add the price of a crystal. And shipping.

Quantum Hobby's, one of my favorite suppliers.
Hitec 555 5 Ch Micro FM Receiver
Note: Dual conversion crystal required.
Price Qty
$52.99 Size Color

Hitec Electron 6 Ch. FM Receiver

Price Qty
$54.99 Size Color

Add the price of the crystals.

I paid $56.00 each for the two Spektrum AR6000 that I got from my LHS.
The nearest LHS for me is fifty miles one way.


Haven't steped on the antena yet.



Always remembering the ads, it is for park flyers.
ragbag is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 01:32 AM
  #8  
Norsehammer
Experimentation For All!
 
Norsehammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Terrace, British Columbia
Posts: 3
Default

When every owner that has posted a range test report on forums like this reports good results at traditional 72 mz. long distances, what is it that causes the manufacturer to only suggest the system for parkflyers?

Norse
Norsehammer is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 03:12 AM
  #9  
Grasshopper
Some Assembly Required
 
Grasshopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 12,070
Cool

I'm new to the electric world and have been looking at which system to buy. The Spektrum was at the top of the list. I stopped at a hobby shop yesterday while traveling and looked it. The guy told me that you could not use any servos larger than micros and that's why they class it for park flyers. I would like to buy a system that will take me into the future several years and allow me to move up to larger planes too. Does anyone know for sure that you cannot use larger servos hooked to the Spektrum receiver? I really like the idea of not worrying about interfering with someone else or the guy on the other side of the soccer field turning on and shooting me down.

Tom
Grasshopper is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 04:24 AM
  #10  
qban_flyer
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Exclamation

It's not the size of the serovs that prevent anyone from using it in larger models, it's the fact that Horizon and Spektrum have designed it to be used with park flyers strictly.

While some are flying larger models with their DX-6 radios, it is not a good idea to do so.
 
Old 03-08-2006, 04:32 AM
  #11  
Grasshopper
Some Assembly Required
 
Grasshopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 12,070
Default

Is it because of the transmitter range?
Grasshopper is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 05:03 AM
  #12  
Norsehammer
Experimentation For All!
 
Norsehammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Terrace, British Columbia
Posts: 3
Default Demonstrated Range vs Power handling

The Spectrum is just a JR trasnsmitter with different radio transceiver board, the reciever's ability to handle the current draw of several larger servos could be the problem, I really don't think its transmitter output power or reciever reception ability with the numerous reports of demonstrated great range ability that abound here and elsewhere on the web. There must be something else going on there, in the way of a limitation, or the Spektrum people wouldn't be limiting their market potential like that.
Norsehammer is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 10:16 AM
  #13  
Geoff_Gino
Geoff Ogden
 
Geoff_Gino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 628
Default

Originally Posted by Wingswithwatts View Post
I'm new to the electric world and have been looking at which system to buy. The Spektrum was at the top of the list. I stopped at a hobby shop yesterday while traveling and looked it. The guy told me that you could not use any servos larger than micros and that's why they class it for park flyers. I would like to buy a system that will take me into the future several years and allow me to move up to larger planes too. Does anyone know for sure that you cannot use larger servos hooked to the Spektrum receiver? I really like the idea of not worrying about interfering with someone else or the guy on the other side of the soccer field turning on and shooting me down.

Tom
When I bought my Spectrum I ordered 4 Rx's with it and simply removed my old JR Rx's and replaced them.

I am using a mix of micro, standard and retract servo's. Hitech, Highmark and JR.

NOT A SINGLE GLITCH!!!
Geoff_Gino is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 11:21 AM
  #14  
Will Hicks
Dealer
 
Will Hicks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hendersonville, NC
Posts: 94
Default

It appears that the park flyer badge is because the receiver can be blocked by large pieces of metal. The metal would be the comparatively large engines installed in larger models. I suppose the same reasoning can be used for large electric power motor systems.
Will Hicks is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 01:22 PM
  #15  
rross
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
Posts: 2
Default 2.4Ghz systems

2.4Ghz is nice when you are away from all low power routers, IP cameras, and other devices that are using 2.4Ghz. I design video down link systems for law enforcement helicopters. We transmit on some systems on 2.4Ghz at a power level of at least 5 to 10 watts into a 4dBi antenna. That means that the power level flying a 500' is going to be some place in the 25 watt level. Your low power R/C transmitter will be completely wiped out. Also keep in mind that a city transmitter site with a lot of 800Mhz transmitters will also radiate on 3rd harmonic, which is in the 2.4
Ghz range. There are a lot of people buying power amplifiers (Not legal) for there camera systems which could also cause interference. Just a couple friendly inputs. Most of the LE transmitters are on 2475Mhz. LASO is on 2461Mhz.
rross is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 01:35 PM
  #16  
catfight
Anything with Air
 
catfight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 21
Default

rross,

What is law enforcement doing transmitting in a public service band and how do they get exemptions to use so much power? Does this law enforcement equipment fall under the Part 15 FCC Rules? I have not read the FCC rules on this but it does not make much sense to allow this to happen. Could you clarify please- very interested! What is LASO? Surely this would wipe out all com with any and all routers in any area they are flying over?
Thanks
catfight is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 01:54 PM
  #17  
rross
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
Posts: 2
Default

Originally Posted by catfight View Post
rross,

What is law enforcement doing transmitting in a public service band and how do they get exemptions to use so much power? Does this law enforcement equipment fall under the Part 15 FCC Rules? I have not read the FCC rules on this but it does not make much sense to allow this to happen. Could you clarify please- very interested! What is LASO? Surely this would wipe out all com with any and all routers in any area they are flying over?
Thanks
Well, let me say this, 2458Mhz, 2475Mhz and 2492Mhz are frequencies assigned to the broadcast group, transmitting at least 10 watts to an antenna with some gain. LE uses these frequencies on a shared bases. They donot fall under part 15, instead under part 90 of the FCC rules. LASO stands for Los Angeles Sheriff's Office. LAPD is also in there at 2475Mhz. As well as the Federal Gov't in some cases. they all have valid licences to use these frequencies by the FCC
rross is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 02:10 PM
  #18  
Geoff_Gino
Geoff Ogden
 
Geoff_Gino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 628
Default

I am going to risk throwing my 2 cents worth in here and will suffer the wrath of all the people who seem to see only the negative of progress.

Here is a link to a thread which I posted (post 16#) which I think makes for interesting reading. I have also replied in this thread about the servo question.

http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4020

I have yet to meet or see a R/C member (here I exclude the Glider pilots) who does NOT fly in your face and I mean real close.

Everyone wants to see his plane in flight and more importantly show it to everyone in the pits. Be honest we are all guilty of this.

I have installed my DX6 into a 2m glider and generally fly at what I judge to be 400 to 500 meters (where I can still safely see it) and have yet to experience a single glitch or drop out. The glider has a combination of micro and standard servo's without a single problem.

Guys embrace the new technology - it is all good and let's be perspective about the range issues (or supposed range issues).

As I have said in a previous post - who flies behind buildings.
Geoff_Gino is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 03:17 PM
  #19  
Grasshopper
Some Assembly Required
 
Grasshopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 12,070
Default

Kind of where I was headed. Heck, I can hardly see the end of my arm clearly let alone an airplane almost a 1/4 mile away. It looks to me to be a great system.

Tom
Grasshopper is offline  
Old 03-08-2006, 05:13 PM
  #20  
Rodneh
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 753
Default

The only logical reason to limit the servos you can use is the power distribution system for the servo power. You can only pass so much current through the copper strips in the receiver (routes power to the servos from the voltage supplied to the receiver). Without knowing what the size of these strips are (cross sectional area) you can not reliable say how many or what type of servos can be powered safely. Since this is a very small receiver, I'd bet the copper area is on the minimal size and as a result, current limited. If you use a seperate power source for the servos (routing their power leads external to the receiver) and only used the control signal from the receiver, there should be no limit to the servos you could use. This same limitation applies to all receivers where the servo currents are high, not just the 2.4GHZ units.
Rodneh is offline  
Old 03-09-2006, 04:26 AM
  #21  
drensa
Crazy Dave
 
drensa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pa
Posts: 9
Default

Hi everyone. I've heard stories about using the 2.4GHz units on .40 size aircraft tested at the AMA!, as well as many others using it in planes as large as .90 size!, again without ONE failure. The posting person talking about large metal objects such as big motors and batteries interfering with the signal is absolutely CORRECT. The wavelength of a 2.4 GHz signal is less than 4", and there are many things in larger planes that can block that right out. I personally have witnessed a heliman fly a .30 size heli on a Spektrum unit without any problem, and anyone familiar with helis knows that the amp draw through a heli's receiver is much greater than a standard airplane, so power consumption through the receiver is apparently NOT a big issue. Hope this helps and I'd advise NOT using these units on anything bigger than Speed 400/480 electrics or .09 or less glow planes as the manufacturer suggests. Crazy Dave
drensa is offline  
Old 03-09-2006, 05:36 AM
  #22  
Geoff_Gino
Geoff Ogden
 
Geoff_Gino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 628
Default

Well there it is - Spectrum has been flown for 4 months now and to the far reaches of the Earth and I have yet to see one single bad report/review of the system.

Personally can't wait till JR come out with a Tx module so that I can put it into a JR2610
Geoff_Gino is offline  
Old 03-09-2006, 11:31 PM
  #23  
WWI Ace
triplane test pilot
 
WWI Ace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pampa, TX
Posts: 1,600
Default

I just bought this radio. I haven't got to use it yet but I can't wait!!! Finally a RX I don't have to solder a shorter antenna on. No more scale planes with tails hanging out. I love it!!!!
WWI Ace is offline  
Old 03-10-2006, 01:22 AM
  #24  
rcers
Super Contributor
 
rcers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Trophy Club TX
Posts: 6,314
Default

Originally Posted by rross View Post
Well, let me say this, 2458Mhz, 2475Mhz and 2492Mhz are frequencies assigned to the broadcast group, transmitting at least 10 watts to an antenna with some gain. LE uses these frequencies on a shared bases. They donot fall under part 15, instead under part 90 of the FCC rules. LASO stands for Los Angeles Sheriff's Office. LAPD is also in there at 2475Mhz. As well as the Federal Gov't in some cases. they all have valid licences to use these frequencies by the FCC
Hmmmm - that is odd since one of the "Rules" of the 2.4-2.5Ghz range is a max power output of 1w.

The whole idea is that every user of the spectrum understands this limit and the 1w max was to avoid the exact thing you mention.

Strange....

Since you design 2.4Ghz downlink systems shouldn't those devices follow the rules of use for that frequency range? Have I been given bad info about the 1w max??

2.4Ghz is nice when you are away from all low power routers, IP cameras, and other devices that are using 2.4Ghz.
I have done significant testing with these devices - no issues whatsoever.
Mike
rcers is offline  
Old 03-10-2006, 03:36 AM
  #25  
thomdoe
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 766
Default

OK in my stupidity I tested a motor and prop set up with the rx and motor in my hand WAS this a bad idea? I didn't think so at the time. The prop took off one of the antenna. I thought bad news !! Made a mess of my brand new spectrum. Got out out the solder equipment a piece from another rx, cut to size soldered on WORKS GREAT. K
thomdoe is offline  

Quick Reply: Spectrum 2.4GHZ range test


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

Page generated in 0.13606 seconds with 11 queries